• Bypassing fingerprint scanners using artificial fingerprints

      Ford, Kerry C. (2021-05)
      Although fingerprint scanning technology is a convenient and user-friendly method of securing many modern devices, it is not without its flaws. In this paper, a methodology for creating artificial fingerprints is presented, as well as the experimental results, in order to display several low-cost techniques that can be used to bypass modern fingerprint sensors. Three methods are employed: direct collection, indirect collection (mold), and indirect collection (copy). First, using direct collection, a mold and cast of a physical fingerprint is created using very low-cost materials. Second, a fingerprint is indirectly collected from a surface and is used to create a 3D printed mold. Finally, a fingerprint is gathered using the indirect collection method, but is then inverted to achieve a higher resolution 3D printed copy of the original finger. Experimental results are presented, showing the effectiveness of the three fingerprint fabrication techniques on optical and capacitive sensors. Experimental results reveal that it is possible to bypass most sensors 80-100% of the time. The artificial fingerprints produced this way are reusable for many months. This was accomplished using widely available tools, and at a lower cost than that which has been previously reported in other research.
    • Cantaloupe kingdom

      Camilleri, Peter (2022-05)
      Maurice Morrigan lives and works on an organic farm owned by Anselmo, in the Pang Yang, a historic misnomer in the Hudson Valley. The Black Creek runs through the farm and creates highly fertile soil, compromised by weeds, flooded irrigation ditches, beaver dams, and storms. Maurice gives all his energy to maintaining the farm, despite its cost on his social life and Anselmo's antagonistic dismissiveness.
    • The caregiver experience : the impact of environmental music therapy in the surgical intensive care unit

      Millstein, Allison (2016-12)
      This study examines the effects of an Environmental Music Therapy (EMT) protocol on the caregiver experience in the Surgical Intensive Care Unit (SICU). For the purpose of this study, EMT may be understood as a music therapy intervention designed to implement live music that attunes to the sonic environment of a medical unit while gradually shifting to address psychological, physical, and contextual needs of caregivers. In this study, caregivers are defined as family members and loved ones, ages 18 an older, involved in active care of related patients within the SICU at Mount Sinai Beth Israel. An experimental design was implemented via examining one group’s pre and post-intervention surveys. Results did not indicate statistically significant impact of an EMT protocol on caregiver experience in regards to interactions with staff, perceived pain of patients, or ability of music to mask/blend with noxious environmental sounds. However, without regard to statistical significance, results do indicate preliminary levels of impact of EMT on caregiver experience in the SICU. Small sample size may be accountable for lack of statistical significance given preliminary results. This research study, while unable to yield significant results, may point to a need for future research regarding the use of music therapy interventions within intensive care unit environments.
    • Childhood adversity, fantasy proneness, openness to experience, and the use of imagination in the work of fine artists

      Carella, Amanda (2022-05)
      Why do some artists choose to create work from their imagination while others produce work based on things they see? Psychologists have long been aware of a link between mental health and the healing powers of creation, but have yet to examine if there is a specific distinction between why someone chooses fantasy or realism as the subject of their works of art. This study draws upon research done on childhood adversity, fantasy proneness, and openness to experience to determine correlations between artists who report using ideas from their imagination, and those who report using ideas from everyday life or other artists’ work. Childhood adversity, fantasy proneness, and openness have each been linked to greater creativity, which may help to better understand stylistic differences between artists. Participants were assessed using the Adverse Childhood Experiences Questionnaire, Creative Experiences Questionnaire, and openness to experience subscale from the Big Five Inventory, as well as a brief self-report survey regarding the use of imagination as the inspiration behind their art-making. Results showed significant support for a relationship between adverse childhood experiences and both fantasy proneness, and openness. These three variables were also found to significantly predict use of imagination, with openness being the only variable to contribute unique variance to the prediction of imagination. These findings give insight into some of the developmental and phenomenological aspects of artistic creativity.
    • The cognitive effort of lying

      Altebrando, Geena (2015-07)
      Being able to directly measure if an individual is lying or not can have many advantages. The current study set out to determine if there were differences in cognitive effort when lying and telling the truth. Participants (N=20) were asked to create or recall 8 events from the Life Events Inventory list. In half of the trials participants told a story, in the other half they told a story and performed an irrelevant simple reaction time task. Disfluency in the participant’s narratives and reaction time in the reaction time task were measured to assess how well participants performed each task. For the reaction time task, there were significant differences between the task type conditions, but not between the story type conditions. For the disfluency measures, there were significant main effects of story type (truth versus lie) for all measures, but no main effects of task type (dual versus single). There was an interaction for filled pauses which indicated more filled pauses for the single, lie condition than any other condition. Overall, reaction times suggested no difference in cognitive effort when lying or telling the truth, whereas disfluency suggested there were some cognitive differences.
    • A collaborative autoethnographic exploration of experiences of three international music therapy interns during their clinical training

      Zhang, Xiyu; Shi, Rongrong; Hsu, WanLing (2016-04)
      There has been little written about the experiences and concerns of music therapy students during their clinical training. Even more scarce are studies examining the experiences and concerns of international music therapy students. The most difficult studies to find were those conducted by international students themselves who possess "first-hand" data. The purpose of this research is to develop narratives that will reveal the lived experience of three international music therapy students in the United States. These narratives will then be discussed to reveal common themes about the students' experience of acculturation, as well as strategies they developed to help them be successful in becoming music therapists. The process of conducting this research study not only changed our perception of our clinical training, but also helped articulate how our education abroad has affected our world view. This study holds potential benefits for music therapy students who will encounter many of the same challenges, and offers strategies about how to manage these challenges. For educators and supervisors, this study offers a vehicle for a better understanding of the East Asian students or supervisees with whom they work.
    • Comedy and tragedy : a history of theatre as a reflection of social identity

      O'Grady, Ryan (2020-05)
      In The Poetics, Aristotle outlines the origins and history of Greek theatrical performance to set up his analysis of Tragedy as the successor to the Epic poem...As such, Aristotle, although most likely unintentional, frames Comedy and Tragedy as two genres that share little to no similarities other than being forms of theatrical performance. I acknowledge the two genres possess many differences in terms of plot structure, staging and the audience's emotional response, but these differences do not make them inherently oppositional. In fact, my paper will hopefully show by analyzing how Tragedy and Comedy functioned during eras when the theatre was a central artform in society--Greece, Rome, Renaissance England, and the post-WWII Theatre of the Absurd--that not only do these two genres share many similarities as art forms, but they also share the same communal function by reinforcing the ideologies of the time period.
    • A comparison of mainstream and evolutionarily informed physical fitness

      Fell, Jessica (2014-05)
      This study aimed to explore the health and fitness activities, perceptions, expectations, motivations, and outcomes of Gold’s Gym members (representative of a mainstream gym experience) and CrossFit members (representative of an evolutionarily informed training program). These variables are included in broad predictions of CrossFit members having higher attendance rates, reporting a greater feeling of community and camaraderie, and increased fitness outcomes as compared to Gold’s Gym members. Results indicated that members of modern and evolutionarily informed fitness facilities might not vary greatly in attendance rates both within group, and as compared to one another. Personality characteristics did not appear to deviate either, although source of motivation (extrinsic versus intrinsic) may. However, motivations for choosing a facility, equipment used, and time spent on activities differed, and coincided with the respective gym type. Furthermore, broad perceptions of physical health and fitness appear to correspond with the underlying philosophy of the fitness facility chosen.
    • Conceptualizing and defining romantic love

      Krass, Justin K. (2007-05-09)
      Two studies investigated how individuals conceptualize romantic love using the Love Word Conceptualization Survey to examine how strongly 119 emotions, behaviors, and attitudes were associated with romantic love. Study 1 had 54 participants and study 2 had 320 participants. The results of both studies suggest that individuals mainly associate positive attributes with romantic love and are less likely to associate negative attributes with it. Furthermore, quality communication and nurturing physical behaviors appear to be key components of how individuals conceptualize romantic love. Principal components analyses suggest that there may be a positive emotions factor of romantic love, as well as a negative emotions factor. The results are congruent with the theory that the concept of romantic love is prototypically organized.
    • Creating a mesh sensor network using Raspberry Pi and XBee radio modules

      Forcella, Michael (2017-05)
      A mesh network is a type of network topology in which one or more nodes are capable of relaying data within the network. The data is relayed by the router nodes, which send the messages via one or more 'hops' until it reaches its intended destination. Mesh networks can be applied in situations where the structure or shape of the network does not permit every node to be within range of its final destination. One such application is that of environmental sensing. When creating a large network of sensors, however, we are often limited by the cost of such sensors. This thesis presents a low-cost mesh network framework, to which any number of different sensors can be attached. The hardware configuration is detailed in such a way that anyone with a modest understanding of technology will be able to reproduce it. The software setup required by the user has also been minimized and clearly documented. Details specific to the user's setup can be entered into a configuration file and the majority of software scripts are scheduled to run automatically via Linux Cron jobs. I conclude by outlining several potential modifications to the framework, including further automation of the software setup, inclusion of additional hardware, and alternate methods for downloading data from the network.
    • Creating community, home, and resources with music therapy: a program proposal for Family of Woodstock

      Pomerselig, Noah (2021-05)
      The following is a proposal for the implementation of a music therapy program for adolescents experiencing homelessness within Family of Woodstock’s continuum of care. This proposal outlines the rationale and theoretical justification of this program as well as outlining the content and structure of the proposed music therapy services. This proposal includes descriptions of music therapy in general and how it has been implemented with this population in other programs. This program is designed to be implemented by one full-time music therapist and integrates with the existing services provided by the organization. The integration of a music therapy program is congruent with Family of Woodstock’s mission statement and organization goals.
    • Cross-language neighborhood density effects in early and late bilingual word recognition

      Lane, Amanda B. (2015)
      A central debate in research involving bilinguals is related to how the languages possessed by bilinguals interact while orthographic processing of one language occurs. Past research suggests that there is influence from a bilingual’s non-relevant language when she or he is processing words in the other language. One way of measuring such influence is achieved by varying the number of orthographic neighbors between languages and measuring the difference in reaction times to words with many and fewer cross-language neighbors. In this study, early and late English-Spanish bilinguals, who differed in experiences with their languages, responded to English and Spanish words in a progressive demasking task that differed by the number of orthographic neighbors (many or none) present in the other language. As expected, English words with many cross-language Spanish neighbors were responded to more slowly than English words with no cross-language Spanish neighbors. However, there was no significant difference in reaction times to Spanish words with many or no cross-language neighbors in English, which was unexpected. This pattern was similar in the two groups of bilinguals. Similar results were obtained in a control experiment with monolingual, English-speaking individuals, which suggests that the results obtained from the bilingual study might be due to some uncontrolled lexical variable (e.g., low imageability of specific English words with many Spanish neighbors).
    • Cultures of mentorship: a qualitative investigation of peer mentorship during high school in the US and Japan

      Hankour, Kamil (2022-05)
      Despite the known benefits of mentorship, little is known about informal peer mentoring relationships in the high school context, and even less is known about how those relationships manifest in different cultures. This qualitative study sought to shed light on this topic by administering a survey designed to tap key concepts related to informal peer mentorship in high school to fourteen participants, seven in the US and seven in Japan. Themes relating to instrumentality/socio-emotionality, responsibility, hierarchy, and benefits from these relationships in each sample are discussed, as well as cultural differences and similarities in how these concepts emerge. Japanese participants described relationships that were consistently instrumental or socio-emotional, while American participants often had relationships that shifted between these categories. Regardless of country of origin, most participants preferred to describe their relationships as egalitarian. Responsibilities differed based on the perceived social role of the participant and their mentor within each cultural context. Participants in both samples described a variety of benefits derived from their mentorships. Implications and future directions for this line of research are discussed.
    • Current trends in music therapy and pain management

      Vicinanza, Jillian (2017-12)
      The purpose of this study is to examine music therapy (MT) as it is currently used in the treatment of individuals who are coping with pain. A 36-question survey, offering both multiple choice and short answer questions, was offered to professional music therapists (MT-BC) with clinical experience living and working within the United States (U.S.). Potential survey participants were identified through their membership with the American Music Therapy Association (AMTA). A total of 246 music therapists participated in this survey. The majority of respondents (36%) reported utilizing a combination of methods from a variety of MT theoretical perspectives. Fifty-eight percent of respondents indicated that they use music in sessions for the purpose of pain management at least "sometimes," and 93% perceive that the client-therapist relationship, otherwise referred to as the therapeutic relationship, is an extremely important factor in whether MT treatment will be successful in pain management. Ninety-four percent of all respondents admit to collaborating with at least one other type of helping professional, and 91% of respondents believe that interdisciplinary teamwork is very important when working with clients and pain management. Results of this survey indicate that Board-Certified Music Therapists in the U.S. are conducting therapeutic sessions utilizing various MT techniques for pain management, and believe in the necessity of an optimal client-therapist relationship. Implications of the results for clinical practice and future direction of music therapy research are discussed.
    • Deception-detection and trust as major elements of mating-relevant behavior

      Tauber, Briana R. (2014-05)
      From an evolutionary perspective, there is nothing more important than mating and reproductive success. According to modern evolutionary psychology, humans have evolved various adaptive mating-related traits, which include ideas based on parental investment theory (Trivers, 1972), life history strategy (Figueredo et al., 2006), strategic pluralism (Gangestad & Simpson, 2000), and sexual strategies (Buss & Schmitt, 1993) for reproductive success. Mating intelligence (MI) can be defined as the cognitive processes (conscious or unconscious) that underlie successful mating-relevant interactions and outcomes (Geher & Kaufman, 2011). It has been proposed that performance in MI can predict one’s likelihood of attracting a viable mate, thus predicting reproductive success (Geher, Miller, & Murphy, 2008). However, currently only a self-report scale of MI exists (Geher & Kaufman, 2007). Although this study was originally aimed to develop an ability-based measurement of MI (which would allow us to tap an individual’s actual abilities that may lead to reproductive success), exploratory analysis of the data proved to be most fruitful in the realm of mating-relevant deception-detection and correlates related to one’s tendency toward trusting others.
    • Depression, control, and counterfactual potency: a proposed moderated mediation model of counterfactual thinking and performance

      Colby, Kelly (2018-05)
      The functional theory of counterfactual thinking was created to explain the purpose and corresponding outcomes of counterfactual thoughts, thoughts in which individuals imagine how differences in past life events may have led to differences in their current circumstances. Though this theory predicts that the generation of upward counterfactual thoughts, in particular, where the imagined outcome is better than the actual outcome, leads to performance improvements between tasks due to its catalytic effect on behavior, evidence supporting this idea has been inconsistent. In light of this, two models were constructed and tested using an SPSS macro known as PROCESS. In these models it was hypothesized that upward counterfactual thinking would lead to performance improvements between two anagram tasks through increases in perceived control. Further, the magnitude of this enhancement effect was predicted to vary with the degree of plausibility perceived by the thinker, and would not occur for individuals experiencing depression. As both of these models were unsupported, the chosen methodology for this study was evaluated and the relationship between counterfactual thinking and performance was considered further.
    • The design of high quality factor bifilar archimedean coil geometries for wireless power transfer applications

      Feenaghty, Michael (2019)
      This thesis explores the optimization of a planar coil's geometry for wireless power transfer applications. Wireless power transfer is a popular field of study today due to its wide range of uses in professional and consumer applications. The transfer of data or power without the need for a wired connection allows for the design of increasingly robust and convenient electronic devices. However, wireless power transfer is still limited by poor power transfer efficiency and skew sensitivity under suboptimal conditions. For planar coils, optimal power transfer occurs when the transmitter and receiver coil are very closely spaced, with minimal misalignment between the two coils. This thesis proposes novel planar coil geometries which reduce the sensitivity of the coils to these attributes. The proposed geometries all have the same spatial footprint as the original planar coil to make the proposed changes practical in cases where the available area for the planar coil is limited, such as consumer smartphones. The best coil design exhibits an improvement in power transfer of up to 20% over separation distance, and up to 13% overall with lateral misalignment. The proposed designs enhance the performance of planar coils for wireless power transfer without requiring more board real estate to be dedicated to the coil geometry, maintaining a compact system design.
    • Discord in Thornfield Hall: critical postcolonial intersectionality in Jane Eyre

      Ciervo, Emma (2022-05)
      By applying the lenses of postcolonial and trauma theory to the novel, we can begin to develop an understanding of how Jane and Bertha can become critically intersectional characters. Each of these lenses illuminates the clear struggle that each woman faces within a tightly structured Victorian society, and their means of navigating it result in their processing of emotions on a deeper level. I argue that while on the surface it appears that Jane and Bertha are each recognizing the other, they do so only on the most basic level because each only sees it in relation to her own self rather than on a more widespread level. Throughout this thesis, I argue that by exposing the crudeness of this original intersectionality, as well as the privileges gained and lost through the patriarchal structure of Victorian society and empire, Brontë's initial creation of crude intersectional characters can evolve into a deeper level of understanding of one another, or what I am calling critical postcolonial intersectionality.