• Pervasive developmental disorders: a golden section study

      Davison, Mitzie (2010-03-18)
      Objectives. Pervasive developmental disability theories are combined with golden section research in an effort to understand how people organize and process interpersonal/social information. In order to comprehend theories that explain the social impairments in those diagnosed with a pervasive developmental disorder (PDD), this study employed the golden section hypothesis, which predicts that people organize their interpersonal judgments in a ratio approximately 62% positive and 38% negative. Method. The research was done individually, orally and with visual aids by the researcher with 10 participants with a pervasive developmental disability and 10 undergraduate college participants who did not have any disability. Participants were asked to rate 9 cartoon characters (Garfield, Bugs Bunny, Mickey Mouse, Spongebob Squarepants, Snoopy, Elmo, Tasmanian Devil, Scooby Doo, Fred Flintstone) and one self-category using 12 different bi-polar dimensions (generous-stingy, pleasantunpleasant, true-false, fair-unfair, active-passive, energetic-lethargic, sharp-dull, excitable-calm, strong-weak, bold-timid, hard-soft, rugged-delicate). These dimensions had well-established positive and negative poles. Results. Both pervasive developmentally disabled and normal participants had average positive ratings of the cartoon characters that were not statistically significant from the golden ratio 0.618. Both of these populations rated themselves in a manner consistent with Lefebvre et al (1986), who predicted that people .71 mean positive self-ratings. Conclusion. The results indicate that both PDD and non- PDD participants utilize the golden section ratio. The study supports the robustness of this ratio in a clinical population that has not been previously studied. Due to a small sample size, it is necessary to interpret these results with caution. It would be beneficial for further research to replicate this study with more participants.
    • The politics of touch

      Kurtz, Teresa (2020-08)
      Through this thesis, I aim to deconstruct and reconstruct what it means to reach out and touch another by analyzing the role of physical touch in literature with a New Historicist approach. In other words, I am reading into the signification of touch within different literary texts while taking into account the text's geographical, historical, and sociological conditions. In a different time, place, and sociocultural climate, the same signifier--such as touch--will necessarily have different significations. Therefore, touch in all of its forms must be read within its individual literary context.
    • Posthumanism and compassion in Jeff VanderMeer’s Southern Reach trilogy: a vegetarian, ecofeminist approach

      Peterson, Audrey (2016-05)
      "Both the genre of VanderMeer’s trilogy and the theme of the posthuman operate in a chiasmic relationship to convey a clear teaching that evokes a powerful message about humanity, posthumanity, and the future of the planet. I argue that the Southern Reach trilogy illustrates the duality of the term posthumanism: Characters exceed what it means to be human in a biological sense, and in an ethical sense, certain characters become posthuman in that they accept a mode of thinking that does not invariably place the human at the center. My argument outlines two very different ways of using the term posthuman, yet also illustrates the commonalities between each of my applications, thus creating a means of applying the posthuman lens as a tool for approaching literary texts."
    • A preliminary study of the effects of a novice hacker's learning process on a computer hardware and base operating system component performance

      Mikijanic, Christine (2020-05)
      One of the major problems in computer security today is the mitigation of damage caused by malware. Common approaches for gathering information about this threat have been to investigate and utilize the structure of a malware attack for prevention and reduction of damage, or analysis of the effect of malware originally found in the wild on target computer systems. This thesis provides a means of determining whether or not sufficient information exists to examine the possibility of finding or identifying an inexperienced hacker inside of a computer system. Analysis of pseudo-ransomware inside a virtual machine was performed, with investigation into the performance of the system’s hardware and base operating system components. It was discovered that CPU load was the core of indicators that displayed the presence of possible ransomware, as it consistently displayed longer process completion times and signs of strain under intensified usage. Furthermore, this factor could be paired with statistics for other areas of the system in order to provide more detail about the attack itself.
    • Preschoolers' attachment to grandparent caregivers

      Filangeri-Parashar, Jessica (2008-03-28)
      Currently, there are over 2.4 million children in the United States living in the custodial care of their grandparents. Grandparents as caregivers and the problems their grandchildren face have received little attention in developmental research. The purpose of this paper is to address the possibility that secure attachment relationships with grandparents can serve as a protective factor against the risks of disrupted attachments with parents. In order to address this question, a framework is proposed that combines central elements of two differing perspectives on young children’s relationships, traditional attachment theory, and a social network model. An example of how this model can be used to investigate important developmental questions is outlined.
    • Professional identity development in music therapy: a phenomenological inquiry

      McIntyre, Page (2018-05)
      The following research study is a phenomenological inquiry exploring how music therapists develop their professional identities. Three board-certified music therapists were interviewed and asked to describe what has influenced and shaped their professional identity development. Data was analyzed according to the procedures of interpretive phenomenological analysis. The data revealed four emergent themes that music therapists’ described as playing a role in developing their professional identity. The themes are significant experiences, identities in music, intrapersonal skills, and journey of growth. Related literature is reviewed and implications for future research is discussed. The researcher hopes that this study will benefit music therapists by giving them insight into how they can develop and strengthen their own professional identity.
    • Program proposal: outdoor music therapy

      Goldberg, Daniel (2021-05)
      The program I am proposing involves taking music psychotherapy outdoors along a hiking trail. Musical experiences are widely believed to be vehicles for emotions and experiences. Hiking adventures can serve a similar purpose, as they are literal journeys with ups and downs, challenges, and rewards. These can be related to internal journeys with the same facets. These journeys afford the client and therapist time to talk, solve problems together, and experience silence together. The still and secluded environment that one can find deep in the woods can greatly enhance the musical experience and provide freedom and safety in self-expression. Alternatively, taking time to make music in the woods gives the client a chance to focus on the details of their environment, process the emotions and interactions that occur throughout the journey, and be present in the moment.
    • Proposal for neonatal intensive care unit music therapy program at Brookdale University Hospital Medical Center

      Chilton, Madeline C. (2020-05)
      The following is a proposal for the implementation of a music therapy program in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at Brookdale University Hospital. This proposal provides the rationale for instituting a NICU music therapy program and details the content of the program including services provided, treatment methodology, documentation, required resources, projected outcomes, and evaluation. Recommendations are provided for the qualifications, responsibilities, and integration of a full-time music therapist into the NICU team. The aim of this proposal is to demonstrate the multitude of benefits that a music therapy program will offer the NICU at Brookdale, and provide a feasible plan for its initiation. The inclusion of music therapy services in the treatment modalities offered by the Brookdale NICU will demonstrate a commitment to innovative, family-centered care, and to the mission and core values of the One Brooklyn Health hospital system.
    • Proto-Absurdist strides and leanings: Alfred Jarry’s Shakespearean spirit in Ubu Roi

      Mittenberg, Corey (2007-04-04)
      Although it is generally accepted that Alfred Jarry’s influential 1896 play, Ubu Roi, was revolutionary for its language, innovative staging, and use of black comedy, little has been written to analyze the work’s many Shakespearean connections. Plot devices, characters, dialogue, as well as production choices, display evidence of Jarry’s knowledge of Shakespeare; his appreciation and understanding of the dramatic pieces from which he borrows informs Jarry’s entire play. By incorporating specifically chosen Shakespearean elements, Ubu Roi--primogenitor of the Absurdist theater--continues in the Shakespearean dramatic tradition more thoroughly than most critics acknowledge, due in large part to the manner in which Jarry appropriates them. My paper addresses the issues of legitimate versus illegitimate adaptation as they relate to questions of authorship, style, and audience, as well as the historical background of both Jarry and Shakespeare in the context of French theater. As Shakespeare is an outside voice in France, the role of the other as a subject of spectacle (and the connotations of foreigners and foreign lands in relation to the choice of setting) is also discussed. Additionally, my paper examines the freedom of Shakespeare’s translators in France into the nineteenth century, Jarry’s critical battles over Ubu Roi, and a close study of Jarry’s reworking of Shakespearean characters, plot lines, themes, and staging choices.
    • A qualitative study of interdisciplinary music services

      Bonelli, Thomas; Christman, Chad; Tree, Sarah (2016-05)
      At present, there is little written about music therapy interdisciplinary models from the perspective of co-treating therapists. This manuscript serves to compare prewritten texts on the subject of music therapy collaborative methods with first-hand accounts of co-treating therapists. Five therapists from different fields were interviewed and the transcripts were analyzed for relevant and reoccurring themes. Themes include: (a) broader treatment options; (b) comfort; (c) communication; (d) attention redirection; and, (e) challenges. The findings of this study support the use of music therapy within interdisciplinary therapy treatment teams. Effective co-treatment methods utilize the collective knowledge and expertise of the treatment group in both the planning and execution stages of treatment
    • A quantitative and qualitative approach to understanding and defining hate sex

      Di Santo, Jacqueline M. (2020-05)
      Although a popular topic in the media, there is no research to date on hate sex. The purpose of this study was to attain a better understanding of hate sex and operationally define the construct utilizing both quantitative and qualitative methods to understand and define hate sex. An anonymous survey was completed by 771 individuals (69.8% females, 28.8% males, 1.4% other; mean age = 23.21, SD = 6.59). It was found that individuals who reported having had hate sex in their lifetime were more sexually experienced than individuals who reported never having had hate sex. Individuals who report having had hate sex also appear to hold a different perception of hate sex than the portrayal of hate sex in the media. Using these findings, A definition of hate sex is introduced. Implications and future directions of this line of research are discussed.
    • A Quantitative Study of Nonstructural Carbodyrates in Eastern Hemlock, Tsuga canadensis, and the effects of hemlock woolly adelgid, adelgis tsugae, and elongate hemlock scale, florinia externa ferris, infestation

      Schwartzberg, Lora (2010-07-28)
      Nonstructural carbohydrates (NSC), starch and sugars, in eastern hemlock infested and not infested with hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA) and elongate hemlock scale (EHS) were analyzed. The use of microwave dried and Wiley milled tissue samples is a superior method for determining NSC content than processing fresh samples of eastern hemlock (roughly 76% higher results than fresh samples). However, the microwave dried and Wiley milled samples should not be stored at room temperature for later enzymatic processing. Spatial patterns studied showed no statistically significant differences in NSC of twigs based on cardinal direction and location in the tree canopy, but there were statistically significantly differences among individual trees within the sample group. Twigs from Tsuga chinensis, a HWA resistant species, had a different NSC content from T. canadensis, with statistically significantly lower sugar and starch contents, when compared after budbreak. The starch in the needles contributes the highest percentage towards the total NSC, and the starch in the twigs contributes the least. The starch had more variation (year of growth or infestation) than sugar, signifying starch may break down for translocation more frequently than previously thought, serving a multitude of functions besides nutrient storage. Quantitatively, HWA infestation alters the NSC content of eastern hemlock, in certain tissues of particular ages and at specific times in a season. The greatest statistically significant differences (all higher) in sugars and starch content caused by HWA feeding are found in the previous year’s growth, for sugars in both twigs and IV needles, and starch in twigs only. However, NSC was affected more by the time (season) of collection and between the years of growth (new growth versus the previous year’s growth) than by HWA infestation. A preliminary test for detecting the presence of a bacteria or virus was undertaken by inserting ground HWA into insect-free seedlings of T. canadensis. After one year, the sample group of inoculated with ground HWA showed no difference in health than another inoculated with deionized water. The NSC of the previous year’s growth needles from EHS infested branches with new growth are not significantly different than without new growth. On the previous year’s growth, EHS infested needles differ from HWA infested needles, with EHS infested needles having statistically significant higher free sugars and lower starch. The EHS infested needles (presumable fed upon by a sugar feeder) had statistically significantly higher sugars, just as the HWA infested twigs (presumable fed upon by a starch feeder) had statistically significantly higher starch. My data suggests that overall, the changes in NSC content caused by HWA feeding alone does not seem sufficient to be responsible for the decline and mortality of eastern hemlock.
    • Raise your voice : experiences of silent students in the classroom

      Moss, Alessandra F. (2020-05)
      Class participation may be an important part of students’ learning process, but many students remain silent in college classrooms. This study was a qualitative inductive inquiry exploring the classroom experiences of students who rarely participate in class. Fourteen semi-structured interviews were analyzed using coding methods adapted from grounded theory to gain insight into students’ opinions about class participation, their class participation habits, and beliefs about knowledge in general. Primary themes that emerged were wanting to avoid being wrong and experiencing anxiety, nervousness, or related physical symptoms as reasons not to participate. Students also articulated mostly engaging in low stakes participation, when the risk of being wrong was minimal, primarily when they felt prepared to answer correctly. A variety of beliefs about knowledge were articulated, including, knowledge comes from external authority, and knowledge comes from scientific research, evidence, replication, and consistency. No strong connections were found between beliefs about knowledge and class participation habits. Practical implications for educators and future directions are discussed.
    • Raspberry pi embedded operating system and runtime

      Perry, James J. (2016-05)
      This thesis explores the creation of a small footprint, high-performance Embedded Operating System (EOS) for the Raspberry Pi (RPi). Using a customization approach, the image is configures to include only required functions and omits nonessential functions. The result preserves available memory and storage for use during runtime of an embedded solution. As part of this process, the thesis leverages the resulting runtime environment to provide complex functions (i.e. inter process messaging and GPIO support) that run atomically (noninterruptible).
    • Reading the suprasensual in Leo Tolstoy's Anna Karenina: a thesis in eight parts

      Short, Nicole (2022-08)
      Throughout the text of Anna Karenina, there is a means of experience that is suprasensual, repeated moments in the text that seemed to me to deviate from Tolstoy’s apparently slavish devotion to writing objective, observable reality, departing from what can be represented concretely via the five senses. I wrote a small paper arguing that Tolstoy’s novel represented a reality that was shaped and created by human emotion, in a modernist way, and as such, the strength of Anna’s and Levin’s emotion could explain the supernatural bits of reality created around them. This thesis was sound and generally well argued, but in the years that followed the completion of that paper, I couldn’t shake my curiosity about the peasant dream; there was much more to be said, much more to incorporate and to grapple with in terms of that peasant dream, of Kitty and Levin’s wordless communication, of Anna and Levin’s ability to sense sans senses.
    • Recall disruption produced by noise-vocoded speech: a study of the irrelevant sound effect

      Dorsi, Josh (2013-11-11)
      The Irrelevant Sound Effect (ISE) is the finding that serial recall performance is impaired under complex auditory backgrounds such as speech as compared to white noise or silence (Colle & Welsh, 1976). Much of the current research investigates the role of changing-state complexity of the background stimuli in ISE (e.g., Jones & Macken, 1993). This study investigated whether speech-specific qualities of the irrelevant background have an effect on the ISE. This was done using noise-vocoded speech, an acoustic transformation that removes many of the acoustic properties of speech while preserving the speech intensity profile. Experiment 1 compared serial recall accuracy resulting from white noise and noise-vocoded speech backgrounds and found that noisevocoded speech is more disruptive. Noise-vocoded speech preserves the intensity profile of nature speech with a number of amplitude channels; each channel matches the average intensity for the corresponding channel in natural speech. Experiment 2 systematically varied the resolution of noise-vocoded speech by adjusting the number of these channels. These results show that ISE varies based on the number of channels in noise-vocoded speech, but this change in disruption is not consistent across channel conditions. Results demonstrate that changing state complexity alone is not a sufficient explanation of ISE.
    • The relationship between achievement goals and the academic success of first-generation college students

      Perry, Andrew Holmes (2018-06)
      Recent research has established that first-generation college students, or those students without a parent with a four-year college degree, tend to underperform academically compared to continuing-generation college students, or those with at least one parent with a four-year college degree. The current study was undertaken to attempt to explain this discrepancy, known as the social class achievement gap, through the use of achievement goal theory. A survey of 351 undergraduates was conducted with students reporting their generational status and their adoption of three achievement goals. Their first-semester GPA was later acquired. It was expected that generational status would predict achievement goal adoption, that achievement goal adoption would predict academic performance, and that goal adoption would mediate the relationship between generational status and academic performance. Results did not support these hypotheses. Potential explanations for the null effects and implications of these findings for the social class achievement gap literature are discussed.
    • Resistance in music therapy

      Williams, Kimberly (2018-05)
      This study explores music therapists’ experiences of resistance in therapy. Resistance has been defined as the direct or indirect oppositional behavior of a client due to possible reluctance to change (Newman, 2012). Though resistance has a long history being described in psychoanalytic literature, little is known about its role in music therapy outside of music psychotherapy. This study asked the following research questions: How do music therapists experience resistance in music therapy? In addition, this paper explored how music therapists utilize resistance to help people in music therapy. Eight board-certified music therapists (MT-BC) with various backgrounds of experience were interviewed to gain an understanding of clinicians experiences with resistance and how it manifests in music therapy. Interviews were transcribed and coded using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. Data analysis revealed nine specific themes which were categorized under three general sections - (1) Managing Resistance included three themes: building rapport, acceptance/encouragement, and consistency - (2) The Role of Music included three themes: music for expression, music for connection, and music to match and - (3) Clinicians’ Reactions included three themes: personal thoughts, questioning ability, and perspective. Implications of the study, including the benefits and limitations of resistance for clinical practice are discussed.
    • The role of culture, attachment style, and parenting style in predicting estrangements

      Patel, Jenny (2022-05)
      Social estrangements have negative effects on people's emotion and social lives (Geher et al 2019). The current research is designed to shed light on this general issue to help us better understand the predictors of estrangements. Participants of at least 18 years in age were surveyed in both the United States and in India. A Qualtrics survey was used to collect data from participants. It measured their attachment styles, perception of their parents' parenting styles, cultural orientation, and estrangement history. To obtain the sample, recruitment methods included advertising the Qualtrics survey link on social media, SUNY New Paltz Psychology Subject Pool, and MTurk. A total of 434 (India = 119, US = 315) participants took part (M = 25.82, SD= 8.073). Results are in line with the hypotheses. Although culture is not significantly con-elated with estrangements in this study, there are cultural differences in the number of estrangements one has. Estrangements are negatively con-elated with Authoritative Parenting style, positively correlated with Authoritarian Parenting style, positively correlated with Ambivalent Attachment style, and negatively correlated with Secure Attachment style. Based on these results, the current research concludes that culture, parenting styles, and attachment styles are predictors of estrangements. Implications of this research and future directions are discussed.
    • The role of personal music therapy for music therapists

      Wanamaker, Cara (2019-08)
      The purpose of this paper is to examine whether or not music therapists engage in music therapy as personal therapy. A 32-question survey was electronically distributed to board-certified music therapists (MT-BC) who were working full-time, part-time, or per diem in the United States. Potential study participants were located through the Certification Board for Music Therapists (CBMT) database and contacted by the researcher. Of 177 participants, 55 (31.08%) have utilized music therapy as personal therapy. Music therapists have engaged in music therapy to explore personal issues, receive support, and strengthen professional competencies. For the 122 participants (68.92%) who have never engaged in music therapy as personal therapy, time, finances, engagement in other forms of therapy, and dual relationships within the music therapy profession were leading contributors that deterred music therapists from engaging in personal music therapy. Though a handful of participants believe music therapy is not beneficial for everyone, 95.15% of participants recommended that music therapists receive some sort of therapy. Results of this survey indicate that only a small percentage of music therapists are engaging in music therapy as personal therapy.