• The effects of job crafting and leader member exchange on the affective well-being of emerging adults in college

      Kishna, Celina (2020-12)
      Relatively little research has been conducted on factors that affect the work life of emerging adults. Drawing from a primarily college sample (​N ​= 194), this study investigates the relationships between leader member exchange (LMX), job crafting (JC) and job affective well-being. A simultaneous multiple regression demonstrated that several dimensions of JC were positively associated with job affective well-being. A multiple parallel mediation model conducted with JC as a mediator between LMX and job affective well-being. demonstrated that the increasing structural job resources component of JC was a partial mediator between LMX and job affective well-being. Future studies should include dyadic data from both employees and supervisors to improve research on job affective well-being.
    • Self-Promotion and Gender in the Work Place

      Waterous, Kathleen (2010-03-18)
      Gender role attitudes are blamed for problems women have self-promoting in the workplace. This study examines the differences in the perceptions between men and women on self-promotion. It was expected that men would find it easier and more comfortable than women. Forty-five participants, twenty-three women and twenty-two men were interviewed in a survey that contained close-ended and open-ended items. The survey was designed to assess themes surrounding what would prompt a person to use self-promotion and their relative comfort in doing so. Findings of the study did not support the expectation that men would find it easier and more comfortable. For the majority of the survey, women reported being able to self-promote as easily as men. When asked what they thought self-promotion was, women and men differed in their definitions. Men tended to use a direct style highlighting and showcasing what they were currently doing to obtain benefits while women tended to perceive self-promotion with an inward slant. The women felt that self-promotion was bettering themselves and gaining more confidence. The results overall were not consistent with gender role expectancies for women and men, yet the qualitative results indicate some interesting avenues for future investigations.