• Does female promiscuity increase religious beliefs? testing the male control theory versus the female control theory

      Rolón, Vania (2017-07)
      Most psychological articles examining religion treat this construct as either an independent or controlled variable. Few studies have addressed the possibility that religiosity may shift as a function of environmental cues (i.e., that religiosity may be studied as a dependent variable). Among these studies, even fewer have looked into how religion may be a viable means to suppressing the sexuality of others, particularly that of females. My work aims to test two theories as to which sex stifles female sexual behavior the most. I examined whether reading about a highly versus a less promiscuous target affects participants' religiosity and whether the sex of the target and the participant interact in this effect. A series of ANCOVAs revealed that, while promiscuity levels did not seem to affect religiosity, target and participant sex did interact, with men reporting less religiosity when presented with same-sex targets but females not varying significantly as a result of the target's sex. Results support the existing research that religiosity is a more flexible construct than previously thought.
    • I evolved this way: examining nonmonosexuality as an evolutionary adaptation

      Baroni, Amanda K. (2018-05)
      The main evolutionary purpose of any living creature is to pass on its genes through reproduction, also referred to as reproductive success (Dawkins, 1976). Since successful reproduction requires the copulation of a male and a female of any given species, any sexual behavior which is not exclusively heterosexual is an enigma in evolutionary theory. The affiliation hypothesis advocates for the concept that homosexual behavior may have evolved as a way to maintain social bonds (Muscarella, 1999, 2000). It is generally accepted that sexual behavior is not dichotomous indicating that hominins would have exhibited both homosexual and heterosexual behavior (Muscarella, 2000). This theory would allow for the maintenance of social bonds but would not hinder the possibility of heterosexual reproduction. The current study tests this hypothesis using multiple measures of reproductive success and social connection.
    • A quantitative and qualitative approach to understanding and defining hate sex

      Di Santo, Jacqueline M. (2020-05)
      Although a popular topic in the media, there is no research to date on hate sex. The purpose of this study was to attain a better understanding of hate sex and operationally define the construct utilizing both quantitative and qualitative methods to understand and define hate sex. An anonymous survey was completed by 771 individuals (69.8% females, 28.8% males, 1.4% other; mean age = 23.21, SD = 6.59). It was found that individuals who reported having had hate sex in their lifetime were more sexually experienced than individuals who reported never having had hate sex. Individuals who report having had hate sex also appear to hold a different perception of hate sex than the portrayal of hate sex in the media. Using these findings, A definition of hate sex is introduced. Implications and future directions of this line of research are discussed.
    • Variability in mating strategies: do individual differences in dispositional traits predict sexual preferences?

      Peterson, Ashley (2011-12-27)
      Prior research by evolutionary psychologists has examined dispositional predictors, such as personality, sociosexuality, life history, and attachment style, in relation to mating, yet only one study has examined how these traits predict an individual‘s sexual preferences (i.e., Peterson, Geher, & Kaufman, 2011). Thus, the current study, extending the research of Peterson, Geher, and Kaufman (2011), examined previous studied dispositional predictors, including the Big Five, sociosexuality, life history, and mating intelligence, and three additional ones, attachment, sex drive, and disgust sensitivity. A sample of 638 participants completed a battery of measures of each of these traits as well as providing information about their sexual preferences. The traits predicted variability in sexual preferences – with the attachment dimensions, avoidance and anxiety, and sex drive being most predictive. In addition, sex differences emerged (e.g., males reported enjoying most of the sex acts more than females). Discussion focuses on (a) comparing the results of the current study with Peterson, Geher, and Kaufman (2011), (b) sex differences in preferences for the sex acts, and (c) attachment, sex drive, and disgust sensitivity as predictors of sexual preferences.