• An arts-informed study: developing my identity as a new music therapist during the COVID-19 crisis

      Gawricki, Jillian T. (2021-01)
      This arts-informed, first-person study examines the growth I have achieved as a new music therapist in vocal psychotherapy training, in my own personal therapy, and as a healthcare worker during the COVID-19 pandemic. The data in this study includes (a) poems I wrote based on these experiences, (b) an analysis of musical improvisations based on these experiences, and (c) the personal excerpts of my clinical experiences, and of my experiences creating these poems and musical improvisations. Through the analysis of the data, eight themes were identified: vocal psychotherapy - reflection, growth, and joy; personal therapy - apprehension, reflection, belonging, and growth; COVID-19 - fear, confusion, and chaos. These themes provide insight into my development as a new music therapy professional with generalized anxiety disorder and social anxiety over the course of a year.
    • Benedictine, Bridge Back, and beyond : a proposal for an integrated music therapy program involving graduated levels of substance misuse treatment

      Hitchcock, Sarah (2020-05)
      The following document is an in-depth proposal for expanding a part-time music therapy program in a medical setting focused on the needs and concerns of people who are struggling to recover from an addiction to drugs and/or alcohol. The enlarged program would include a full-time music therapist with expanded responsibilities.This proposal has been designed for the HealthAlliance programs in Kingston, New York: First Step Detoxification Program and the First Step Rehabilitation Program at Benedictine Hospital, the Outpatient Program at Bridge Back South. The needs of patients recovering from alcohol and drug misuse are specific to their stage in the recovery process, detoxification, early rehabilitation, or longer-term rehabilitation. This proposed music therapy program addresses the specific needs of the patient at each stage of the recovery process. This proposal focuses on the needs of the patients, describes details of the actual program, and shows how the music therapy program integrates into the larger context of the medical program. Finally, it lays out the financial needs of the proposed music therapy program and its expected outcomes. This proposal will demonstrate how a strong, integrated music therapy program can assist in the care and healing of people suffering from substance misuse and how to address its underlying causes.
    • Creating community, home, and resources with music therapy: a program proposal for Family of Woodstock

      Pomerselig, Noah (2021-05)
      The following is a proposal for the implementation of a music therapy program for adolescents experiencing homelessness within Family of Woodstock’s continuum of care. This proposal outlines the rationale and theoretical justification of this program as well as outlining the content and structure of the proposed music therapy services. This proposal includes descriptions of music therapy in general and how it has been implemented with this population in other programs. This program is designed to be implemented by one full-time music therapist and integrates with the existing services provided by the organization. The integration of a music therapy program is congruent with Family of Woodstock’s mission statement and organization goals.
    • Grounding music therapy in myth and ritual: a professional outlook inspired by the writings of Carolyn Kenny

      Marx, Benji (2022-05)
      The main purpose of this thesis is to describe my philosophical and theoretical orientation as a music therapist. I will describe a proposed music therapy group for adolescents with depression that will be based within my philosophical and theoretical orientation. This group can be implemented in collaboration with various institutions such as schools and afterschool organizations, or in my own private practice.
    • How singing helped me heal: a heuristic, arts based inquiry

      Nicholas, Emily (2021-05)
      This arts-based, heuristic inquiry explores how the act of singing throughout my lifetime helped facilitate the healing of my trauma and how recent vocal psychotherapy allowed for the recognition of this discovery. Reflexive journaling was used to uncover themes after each vocal psychotherapy session and songwriting was used to further explore these themes. This resulted in six songs based lyrically on the themes. These songs paired with the reflexive journals and data collected from journal analysis reflected a timeline of my life that examines how singing was a tool for protective dissociation, growth, healing, and self-discovery. Participation in vocal psychotherapy further examined my healing journey and acted to facilitate a new step in the process: forgiving myself for my perceived mistakes along the way. By re-examining how singing helped me heal in the past, I was able to gain a holistic understanding of my present ideology as a performer, songwriter, teacher, and music therapy student.
    • An inquiry into sound healing and music therapy

      Erson, Rebecca D. (2020-05)
      Sound and music are powerful forces within the context of the subjective experience, the depths of which are underrepresented within traditional objectively focused research. This study delved into the internal experience of the practitioner when utilizing these forces in the therapeutic setting. As a music therapist who utilizes sound healing within my daily practice, I was interested in looking at my own experience of facilitating sound healing sessions and music therapy sessions. In comparing these two experiences I sought to draw some parallels as well as further define what is different about the two modalities.
    • “Nobody Sees Me Lying There With Depression” : an arts-based research project on a music therapy intern’s experience of major depressive disorder

      Peters, Thomas J. (2020-05)
      Through arts-based research, I studied my experience as a music therapy intern with major depressive disorder. I explored how a depressive episode impacted my work as an intern and how the episode affected my transition from intern to therapist. During the internship, I recorded improvisations to process the depressive episode. Two years after I completed the internship, I revisited these improvisations with prose poem responses. After finding themes and significant phrases, I composed a song entitled “Nobody Sees Me”. This arts-based project focuses on my unique experience, but the project has professional and academic implications. The project demonstrates a need for mental health services for graduate students, and my personal journey may provide support for music therapy interns and students with disorders of mental health.
    • Personal therapy for a graduate student in the analytical music therapy model : a heuristic inquiry

      Wenger, Daniel (2020-05)
      This heuristic inquiry explores my experience as a graduate student undergoing personal music therapy in the Analytical Music Therapy model. After reviewing 27 recordings of my sessions, I used self-dialogue to select five session recordings based on personal significance and examples of growth. The verbal processing of these sessions was transcribed and the musical improvisations were given detailed descriptions. I then re-listened to the sessions and noted significant experiences and patterns directly onto the transcripts and descriptions. After immersing myself in the transcripts and descriptions, I took notes regarding the relationships between session experiences and shifts in my daily awareness. These notes helped me discover areas that were developed through my process. They were defined as the following themes: connection, body awareness, musical awareness, intrapersonal awareness, and professional development. These themes provided a deeper understanding of the expansive experience of AMT, the influence of a student-client perspective on therapy, and the potential for professional development through AMT experiences. An arts-informed reflection provides a holistic understanding of my unique transformation through analytical music therapy.
    • Program proposal: outdoor music therapy

      Goldberg, Daniel (2021-05)
      The program I am proposing involves taking music psychotherapy outdoors along a hiking trail. Musical experiences are widely believed to be vehicles for emotions and experiences. Hiking adventures can serve a similar purpose, as they are literal journeys with ups and downs, challenges, and rewards. These can be related to internal journeys with the same facets. These journeys afford the client and therapist time to talk, solve problems together, and experience silence together. The still and secluded environment that one can find deep in the woods can greatly enhance the musical experience and provide freedom and safety in self-expression. Alternatively, taking time to make music in the woods gives the client a chance to focus on the details of their environment, process the emotions and interactions that occur throughout the journey, and be present in the moment.
    • Sound body, sound mind: a music therapy program proposal for Monte Nido Eating Disorder Treatment Center

      Wallace, Jenna (2021-05)
      The following is a proposal for the addition of a music therapy program for the partial hospitalization program at Monte Nido Eating Disorder Center in Manhattan, New York. Eating disorders can have a devastating impact on a person’s mental, physical, and emotional health. This proposal explains the benefits of implementing a music therapy program for clients recovering from eating disorders. The addition of a music therapy program can allow for new opportunities for clients to express their needs, form an identity beyond their eating disorder, relieve symptoms associated with their eating disorders, and explore their emotions in a creative outlet. This proposal outlines the clinical needs of clients with eating disorders, what services would be provided, treatment methodologies, budgetary concerns, documentation, and projected outcomes. The objective of this proposal is to explore and present the benefits music therapy can provide for clients with eating disorders. The inclusion of a music therapy program will provide further support of Monte Nido’s commitment to quality of care and attention to the benefits of an interdisciplinary team.
    • “We All Get Found Sometimes”: an arts-based heuristic study on a queer music therapist’s expressive music journaling

      Benson, Travis (2020-11)
      This arts-based, heuristic research documents my process as a queer and genderqueer (they/them) music therapist of creating a song cycle based on the themes gathered through lyric analysis from personal, emotional improvisational songs posted on Patreon.com between July 2018 and September 2019. The 35 songs are sorted by season, and were written based upon the major themes prevalent within each season. The result is a 5-song cycle connecting past to present, excerpts from different journals kept during the process, and the data collected from the lyric analysis. This author claims improvisational songwriting through expressive music journaling (EMJ) to get in touch with one’s deep/subconscious feelings is an effective way to: process trauma, grief, and mental illness; that it is able to bridge gaps of time; and that it will help to regard personal material one might not want to dissect without a creative outlet.