• Becoming “spiritual but not religious”: narratives on family of origin, conversion, and commitment

      Marks, Kaelyn Marie (2021-12)
      This qualitative narrative study explored how individuals raised within organized religion(s) came to associate with the orientation of “Spiritual but Not Religious” (i.e., SBNR). Ten semi-structured interviews delved into topics such as family upbringing, religious environment, spiritual development, cognitive dissonance, and resolutions. Notable parental relationship qualities within categories of being positive, distant, strict, and/or abusive emerged. Parental conflict with at least one parent was a shared experience across the sample. It was more common for conflict with fathers to exist as previous literature has suggested. Compared to those raised in more severely religious environments, those raised within less religious environments were more prone to feeling confident and committed with their present spiritual beliefs. This work contributes to further understanding the various developmental pathways and influences on spirtual identity exploration and commitment. Further considerations and implications of the study are discussed.
    • Does female promiscuity increase religious beliefs? testing the male control theory versus the female control theory

      Rolón, Vania (2017-07)
      Most psychological articles examining religion treat this construct as either an independent or controlled variable. Few studies have addressed the possibility that religiosity may shift as a function of environmental cues (i.e., that religiosity may be studied as a dependent variable). Among these studies, even fewer have looked into how religion may be a viable means to suppressing the sexuality of others, particularly that of females. My work aims to test two theories as to which sex stifles female sexual behavior the most. I examined whether reading about a highly versus a less promiscuous target affects participants' religiosity and whether the sex of the target and the participant interact in this effect. A series of ANCOVAs revealed that, while promiscuity levels did not seem to affect religiosity, target and participant sex did interact, with men reporting less religiosity when presented with same-sex targets but females not varying significantly as a result of the target's sex. Results support the existing research that religiosity is a more flexible construct than previously thought.