• Does female promiscuity increase religious beliefs? testing the male control theory versus the female control theory

      Rolón, Vania (2017-07)
      Most psychological articles examining religion treat this construct as either an independent or controlled variable. Few studies have addressed the possibility that religiosity may shift as a function of environmental cues (i.e., that religiosity may be studied as a dependent variable). Among these studies, even fewer have looked into how religion may be a viable means to suppressing the sexuality of others, particularly that of females. My work aims to test two theories as to which sex stifles female sexual behavior the most. I examined whether reading about a highly versus a less promiscuous target affects participants' religiosity and whether the sex of the target and the participant interact in this effect. A series of ANCOVAs revealed that, while promiscuity levels did not seem to affect religiosity, target and participant sex did interact, with men reporting less religiosity when presented with same-sex targets but females not varying significantly as a result of the target's sex. Results support the existing research that religiosity is a more flexible construct than previously thought.
    • Evolutionary mismatch and online dating

      Chapleau, David (2015-09)
      This study aimed to identify how individuals advertised themselves to socially familiar and socially anonymous audiences using online dating profiles. It was demonstrated that when male participants advertized themselves to a socially anonymous audience they placed a much higher emphasis on traits and qualities related to status than either males advertizing themselves to a socially familiar audience or females advertising themselves to either a socially familiar or socially anonymous audience. Additionally, males emphasized their creativity and emotional awareness more so than females regardless of audience type. In contrast female participants showed a tendency to emphasize traits and qualities related to faithfulness much more prominently than male participants. This effect was exaggerated when female participants advertized themselves to a socially familiar audience. It was also shown that male participants who advertized themselves to an anonymous audience emphasized their physical fitness and attractiveness more so than any other group. Together these findings suggest that audience and gender have profound influence over self-presentation in terms of romantic courtship.
    • Friends, love, & tinder: an investigation of the effect of auditory social stimulation on sexual and romantic attraction toward potential mates

      Holler, Richard H (2017-07)
      Humans are social apes that adapted to social networks that were no larger than approximately 150 individuals (Dunbar, 1993). Today, the computer and internet provide humans the means to communicate with virtually anyone across the planet. To explore if using online social venues (e.g., tinder) versus physically attending social venues, such as a popular restaurant, facilitate sexual and romantic attraction toward others, participants were exposed to an auditory stimulus while evaluating 10 images of attractive target mates on 3 dependent measures: interest to have sex with target mates (sex-interest), interest to date target mates (date-interest), and sexual attractiveness of target mates. Of the 3 auditory stimuli--social stimulation (ambient sounds of a restaurant), controlled stimulation (sounds of flowing water), and no stimulation (silence)--sounds of flowing water, compared to silence, produced significantly higher date-interest ratings, t(60) = 2.00, p = .05, d = .51 and, marginally, significantly higher sex-interest ratings, t(57) = 2.00, p = .051, d = .52. Average spent hours per day using a computer significantly predicted date-interest and sex-interest among women and men, respectively. Additionally, the Asexual Identification Scale (AIS; Yule, Brotto, & Gorzalka, 2015) was applied to plot participants along the asexual spectrum. AIS scores significantly predicted (1) sex-interest, but only among men, and (2) date-interest, but only among women.
    • Hot stuff! : the evolutionary psychology behind the attractivness of volunteer firefighters

      Primavera, Nicholas J. (2019-08)
      Research has demonstrated a clear relationship between riskiness and reported levels of general attractiveness. Research has also explored the perceived attractiveness of altruistic behaviors of males and females. No previous study has examined if these same findings apply to members of the volunteer fire service. The current study sought to examine this question, by presenting heterosexual females with pictures and biographies of volunteer firefighters, manipulating the firefighter's riskiness and altruism to measure differences in their levels of perceived attraction. The pictures either showed the model in the traditional gear of the firefighter, the dress uniform, or plain clothes. The biography paired with these pictures either depicted a risky firefighter, an altruistic firefighter, or it simply included that they are a firefighter. Dispositional measures included personality assessment to account for potential individual differences in the relationship between these factors. In general, communal biography cues were found to be most attractive for a long-term relationship, and were rated highest on the Parenting Effort scale. Further, Risky biography cues were found to be most attractive for a brief sexual affair, and were rated highest on the Mating Effort scale
    • I evolved this way: examining nonmonosexuality as an evolutionary adaptation

      Baroni, Amanda K. (2018-05)
      The main evolutionary purpose of any living creature is to pass on its genes through reproduction, also referred to as reproductive success (Dawkins, 1976). Since successful reproduction requires the copulation of a male and a female of any given species, any sexual behavior which is not exclusively heterosexual is an enigma in evolutionary theory. The affiliation hypothesis advocates for the concept that homosexual behavior may have evolved as a way to maintain social bonds (Muscarella, 1999, 2000). It is generally accepted that sexual behavior is not dichotomous indicating that hominins would have exhibited both homosexual and heterosexual behavior (Muscarella, 2000). This theory would allow for the maintenance of social bonds but would not hinder the possibility of heterosexual reproduction. The current study tests this hypothesis using multiple measures of reproductive success and social connection.