• Adjustment Challenges for East Asian International Students

      Wang, Mian (2011-08-31)
      The process of adjusting to a new cultural environment is often considered to be quite stressful. International students of East Asian backgrounds sometimes experience even greater adjustment challenges (e.g., language barriers) which may lead to elevated stress levels. The psychological well-being of these students is also endangered if their excessive stress is not controlled and ameliorated. The current thesis therefore provides an in-depth review of literature documenting common stressors reported by East Asian international students, and the relationship of such stressors to possible outcomes such as depression and anxiety disorders. To better inform services providers about East Asian international students’ unique needs, help-seeking attitudes and behaviors of these students will also be briefly reviewed. Limitations of prior studies, future research directions, as well as suggestions for ways to better assist East Asian internationals are also discussed.
    • A collaborative autoethnographic exploration of experiences of three international music therapy interns during their clinical training

      Zhang, Xiyu; Shi, Rongrong; Hsu, WanLing (2016-04)
      There has been little written about the experiences and concerns of music therapy students during their clinical training. Even more scarce are studies examining the experiences and concerns of international music therapy students. The most difficult studies to find were those conducted by international students themselves who possess "first-hand" data. The purpose of this research is to develop narratives that will reveal the lived experience of three international music therapy students in the United States. These narratives will then be discussed to reveal common themes about the students' experience of acculturation, as well as strategies they developed to help them be successful in becoming music therapists. The process of conducting this research study not only changed our perception of our clinical training, but also helped articulate how our education abroad has affected our world view. This study holds potential benefits for music therapy students who will encounter many of the same challenges, and offers strategies about how to manage these challenges. For educators and supervisors, this study offers a vehicle for a better understanding of the East Asian students or supervisees with whom they work.