• Becoming a music therapist: professional and personal growth of a master’s student

      Maher, Alyssa (2019-05)
      To honor and integrate what I have learned in graduate school, this paper presents an exploration of my clinical foundations, professional development, and paths for future growth as a music therapist. As I have traditionally connected with academic pursuits, writing a paper outlining my graduate school journey in music therapy feels satisfying. However, part of my journey has been reconnecting with my own musical identity and developing my identity as a music therapist. For me, it is difficult to encompass all areas of growth with only words, and thus I have composed a piece of music that mirrors my development. This musical composition became the lens in which I examined myself, and illuminated important aspects of my personal and professional development. The journey to becoming a board-certified music therapist has impacted my life and identity on multiple levels; completing this paper and piece of music serve as ways to integrate what I have learned and honor my new identity.
    • Factors influencing career longevity of music therapists

      Doxsee, Lauren E. (2020-05)
      This survey study examined the factors that experienced music therapists identified as important in maintaining their careers in music therapy. The purpose of this study was to gain insight into how these music therapists combat burnout and stress to remain practicing in the field for 10 years or longer. Previous studies on burnout and career longevity have focused on whether music therapists have burnout, causes or factors leading to burnout and possible shortened careers, and the length of average careers in music therapy. The survey was sent out to 3,421 board-certified music therapists who were selected for longevity in the profession, 10 years or longer. There were a total of 439 responses with 11 responses meeting the requirements for participation. The survey results indicated that time off of work, exercise, and music are the main methods of self-care utilized by experienced professionals. Respondents also indicated that low salary, self-assessed burnout, and a perception of limited job opportunities were the main factors that could have led practitioners to consider leaving the field.