• I evolved this way: examining nonmonosexuality as an evolutionary adaptation

      Baroni, Amanda K. (2018-05)
      The main evolutionary purpose of any living creature is to pass on its genes through reproduction, also referred to as reproductive success (Dawkins, 1976). Since successful reproduction requires the copulation of a male and a female of any given species, any sexual behavior which is not exclusively heterosexual is an enigma in evolutionary theory. The affiliation hypothesis advocates for the concept that homosexual behavior may have evolved as a way to maintain social bonds (Muscarella, 1999, 2000). It is generally accepted that sexual behavior is not dichotomous indicating that hominins would have exhibited both homosexual and heterosexual behavior (Muscarella, 2000). This theory would allow for the maintenance of social bonds but would not hinder the possibility of heterosexual reproduction. The current study tests this hypothesis using multiple measures of reproductive success and social connection.