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dc.contributor.authorBiederman, Joseph
dc.contributor.authorKwon, Anne
dc.contributor.authorAleardi, Megan
dc.contributor.authorChouinard, Virginie-Anne
dc.contributor.authorMarino, Teresa
dc.contributor.authorCole, Heather
dc.contributor.authorMick, Eric
dc.contributor.authorFaraone, Stephen V.
dc.date.accessioned2021-08-03T17:28:07Z
dc.date.available2021-08-03T17:28:07Z
dc.date.issued2005-06
dc.identifier.issn0002-953X
dc.identifier.eissn1535-7228
dc.identifier.doi10.1176/appi.ajp.162.6.1083
dc.identifier.pii10.1176/appi.ajp.162.6.1083
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12648/2027
dc.description.abstractObjective: In a previous study, the authors found that, compared with referred boys with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), girls are less likely to manifest comorbid disruptive behavior disorders and learning disabilities—characteristics that could adversely affect identification of ADHD in girls. However, because referral bias can affect outcome, these findings require replication in nonreferred groups of ADHD subjects. Method: The authors evaluated gender effects in a large group of nonreferred siblings (N=577) of probands with ADHD and non-ADHD comparison subjects. Ninetyeight of the nonreferred siblings (N=73 males, N=25 females) met the criteria for diagnosis of ADHD, and 479 (N=244 males, N=235 females) did not meet those criteria. All siblings were systematically and comprehensively assessed with measures of emotional, school, intellectual, interpersonal, and family functioning. The assessment battery used for the siblings was the same as that used for the probands. Results: The nonreferred males and females with ADHD did not differ in DSM-IV subtypes of ADHD, psychiatric comorbidity, or treatment history. They also showed similar levels of cognitive, psychosocial, school, and family functioning. Conclusions: These findings suggest that the clinical correlates of ADHD are not influenced by gender and that gender differences reported in groups of subjects seen in clinical settings may be caused by referral biases.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Psychiatric Association Publishingen_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectPsychiatry and Mental healthen_US
dc.titleAbsence of Gender Effects on Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: Findings in Nonreferred Subjectsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.source.journaltitleAmerican Journal of Psychiatryen_US
dc.source.volume162
dc.source.issue6
dc.source.beginpage1083
dc.source.endpage1089
dc.description.versionAMen_US
refterms.dateFOA2007-06-30T00:00:00Z
dc.description.institutionUpstate Medical Universityen_US
dc.description.departmentPsychiatryen_US
dc.description.degreelevelN/Aen_US


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Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International