• Oak Orchard Creek Watershed The Location of Sources of Pollution, Annual Loss of Nutrients and Soil to Lake Ontario, and a Test of Effectiveness of Zone Tillage as a Best Management practice

      Makarewicz, Joseph C.; Lewis, Theodore W.; The College at Brockport (2009-05-01)
      Oak Orchard Creek is on New York State’s “303(d)” (1972 Clean Water Act) list of impaired water bodies. Waters designated as 303(d) do not meet water quality standards that states, territories, and authorized tribes have set for them, even after point sources of pollution have installed the minimum required levels of pollution control technology. A 303(d) designation may require the eventual development of Total Maximum Daily Loading (TMDL) for a watershed as a mechanism of managing nutrient losses from a watershed. Funding was received by the Orleans County Soil and Water Conservation District from the Environmental Protection Agency to implement actions that address point and nonpoint sources of nutrient loading to the creek and Lake Ontario’s coastal zone. Thus, the intended use of the funds received was to support the coordination and acceleration of implementation of management practices for nonpoint source pollution, adaptive management strategies, and investigations identifying sources of nutrient pollution. Within the Oak Orchard Creek watershed, the specific goal of prevention and reduction of water pollution in the coastal zone of Lake Ontario is through watershed management, aquatic ecosystem restoration, and nonpoint source management. In this report, as a result of a contract with Orleans County Soil and Water Conservation District, The College at Brockport provides evidence indicating the identity, the location, and the intensity of pollution sources in the Oak Orchard watershed, compares Zone Tillage with Conventional Tillage practices, and develops an annual nutrient budget for Oak Orchard Creek as a basis for development of a Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL).
    • Segment Analysis of Fish Creek North of Pennellville Pond The Location of Sources of Pollution

      Makarewicz, Joseph C.; Lewis, Theodore W.; The College at Brockport (2004-08-01)
      To identify sources of the elevated levels of nutrients observed in Pennellville Pond, a recommendation of the Makarewicz and Lewis Report (2003) was to initiate water quality sampling in the area north of Penneville Pond in the Fish Creek watershed. To accomplish this task, the Soil and Water Conservation District of Oswego County contracted with the Water Quality Laboratory at SUNY Brockport to systematically identify, during baseline and hydrometeorological events, the sources of nutrients, soils and salts within the Fish Creek watershed north of Pennellville Pond. Point and non-point sources were identified through a process called stressed stream analysis or segment analysis (Makarewicz 1999). With this report, we provide evidence suggesting the location and the intensity of pollution sources in the Fish Creek watershed north of Pennellville Pond.
    • Segment Analysis of Sheldon Creek: The Location of Sources of Pollution

      Makarewicz, Joseph C.; Lewis, Theodore W.; The College at Brockport (2002-05-01)
      Considerable concern about the deteriorating condition of Lake Neatahwanta has existed for well over a decade. A goal of the Oswego County Soil and Water Conservation District water quality monitoring program was the development of a statistically defensible database of ecologically important parameters that would allow stewards of the watershed to prioritize and determine which sub-watershed had the largest potential impact on Lake Neatahwanta. After three years of sampling the four creeks draining into the lake, Sheldon Creek, as opposed to Ley, Summerville and Granby Creeks, was determined to be losing the largest amounts of water, soil and nutrients from its watershed. Having determined that Sheldon Creek was the major contributor of soil and nutrients to Lake Neatahwanta, the decision was made to focus point and nonpoint source identification efforts in the Sheldon Creek subwatershed. The Oswego Soil and Water Conservation District shifted its monitoring approach to a process known as segment analysis. In this procedure, the watershed is broken down into geographical segments and systematically analyzed to determine sources of soil and nutrient loss within the watershed that then can be targeted for remediation. Sources of nutrients and soil were observed in several segments.