• Nutrient Loading and Segment Analysis of Streams Entering Lake Neatahwanta: with an Evaluation of the Muckland Demonstration Project in Oswego County

      Makarewicz, Joseph C.; Lewis, Theodore W.; The College at Brockport (1999-02-01)
      Here we report on the status of Lake Neatahwanta and losses of materials and nutrients from the various watersheds draining into the lake based on work done over the past five years. The conclusion that Sheldon Creek and its watershed are the dominant source of sediments and nutrients to Lake Neatahwanta is inescapable. Based on this conclusion, an effort know as segment analysis has begun in the Sheldon Creek watershed to systematically analyze the watershed for sources of nutrient and soil loss. Preliminary results of the segment analysis currently underway are presented. Finally, we provide results from the muckland demonstration study. This study demonstrates the ability of a constructed wetland to remove nutrients from drainage water from a muckland in agriculture.
    • Nutrient Loading of Streams Entering Lake Neatahwanta Oswego County, NY: A Summary of the Lake Neatahwanta Tributary Monitoring

      Makarewicz, Joseph C.; Lewis, Theodore W.; The College at Brockport (1994-06-01)
      This study suggests that the highly eutrophic condition of Lake Neatahwanta is in large part due to the very high loadings of nutrients from the surrounding watershed. Specifically, Sheldon Creek was identified as a major contributor of phosphorus and total suspended solids to the lake. The amount of nutrients entering the lake from Sheldon Creek were in excess of those observed in creeks of New York receiving point source loadings from small sewage treatment plants. Improvement of the water quality of Lake Neatahwanta will depend upon the identification and remediation of the major sources of nutrients in the watershed and in the Sheldon Creek watershed in particular.
    • Port Bay Wayne County, New York

      Makarewicz, Joseph C.; Nowak, Matthew J.; The College at Brockport (2010-01-01)
      Located midway between Rochester and Oswego, New York, Port Bay is one of southern Lake Ontario’s larger but relatively shallow (<25 feet) embayments. The perimeter of the bay is primarily residential, but portions of the shoreline and watershed are part of the Lake Shores Marshes Wildlife Area. Wolcott Creek is the major tributary of Port Bay and drains ~27 mi2 of land that is mostly in agriculture. The bay receives treated effluent from the Village of Wolcott Sewage Treatment Plant. Port Bay suffers from cultural eutrophication and is on the New York State 303d list of Impaired Waters due to an overabundance of phosphorus. Benthic anoxia is a major effect of this eutrophication. Port Bay is impacted by nuisance algae, and harmful algal blooms have been observed (Makarewicz et al. 2009). This short report provides a synopsis of data collected monthly from May through September (2003 to 2009) on the water quality of Port Bay and the lakeside (swimmable depth) of Lake Ontario near the bay.
    • The Loss of Nutrients and Materials from Watersheds Draining Into Lake Neatahwanta Oswego County, NY

      Makarewicz, Joseph C.; Lewis, Theodore W.; The College at Brockport (1998-01-01)
      Here we report on the status of Lake Neatahwanta and losses of materials and nutrients from the various watersheds draining into the lake. Since 1994, Oswego Soil and Water Conservation District has begun several projects, Best Management Practices, to remediate and reduce loss of nutrients in the watershed. These include installation of rock rip-rap below the gaging station and the confluence of the Summerville and Sheldon Creeks, the installation of rock rip-rap in the drainage path near the gaging station on Sheldon Creek and the installation of fencing preventing cows from entering Sheldon Creek upstream from the gaging station at the Jeff Richards Farm. All of these management practices serve to reduce nutrient and material loss from the watershed to Lake Neatahwanta. This report updates the current status of the Lake Neatahwanta watershed, especially the Sheldon Creek watershed.