• Chaumont Bay Jefferson County, New York

      Makarewicz, Joseph C.; Nowak, Matthew J.; The College at Brockport (2010-01-01)
      Chaumont Bay is a 9,000-acre embayment located on the east end of Lake Ontario. The bay receives tributary waters from Guffon Creek, Three Mile Creek, and the Chaumont River, creating three smaller embayments within Chaumont Bay on the northeastern side. The bay is lined by shoreline development, but the watershed is primarily agriculture. Algae blooms plague Chaumont Bay and hamper boating, swimming, and fish consumption. Direct sewage discharges into Chaumont Bay have been documented, but inadequate septic systems are considered the primary source of nutrient loading to the bay. This short report provides a synopsis of data collected monthly from May through September (2005 to 2009) on the water quality of Chaumont Bay and the lakeside (swimmable depth) of Lake Ontario near the bay.
    • Chemical Analysis and Nutrient Loading Of: Salmon Creek, Otis Creek, Black Creek, Spencerport Sewage Treatment Plant, Precipitation Falling in Western Monroe County: with a discussion on The Trophic Status of Long Pond and Stress Stream Analysis of Northrup and Buttonwood Creeks

      Makarewicz, Joseph C.; Lewis, Theodore W.; The College at Brockport (1990-08-01)
      The purpose of the RAP project is to prepare water quality management action plans for watersheds in the three basins (Genesee, Lake Ontario West, and Lake Ontario Central) within Monroe County that empty into the Rochester Embayment. These basinwide plans would be prepared using existing data and literature on each of the three basins. In some instances where baseline and storm event data were not available, such as the Lake Ontario West Basin, it would be necessary to collect the required data. As part of the local contribution to Rochester Embayment Remedial Action Plan, the Monroe County Health contracted with SUNY Brockport in 1988 to collect such data. The general objectives of the 1988 study of Buttonwood, Larkin, Northrup and Round Pond Creeks were: To compare the water quality of stream water from various watersheds; obtain time trend data on chemical and physical characteristics of runoff water of these creeks; To obtain time trend data on chemical and physical characteristics of runoff water of these creeks; To estimate nutrient mass loadings of streams; and To establish and maintain a statistically defensible data set that would permit determination of baseline conditions for evaluations of trends. This work has been completed and is reported in “Chemical Analysis of Water from Buttonwood, Larkin, Northrup, and Round Pond Creeks, Lake Ontario Basin West, May 1987-May 1988” (Makarewicz 1989). The 1989-90 study reported here has a similar set of objectives as the 1988 study but with a focus on Salmon Creek and Otis Creek. In addition, the 1989-90 study was broadened to include the following: Determination of nutrient loads of the Barge Canal to Salmon Creek; A stress stream analysis of Northrup and Buttonwood Creek; Our 1988 study had suggested that there were anthropogenic sources of phosphorus and nitrogen within the watersheds of Northrup and Buttonwood Creeks. Determination of nutrient loads of the Spencerport Sewage Treatment Plant to Northrup Creek; Determination of the nutrient loads to Long Pond from Black Creek as compared to Northrup Creek; Determination of the trophic status of Long Pond; and Determination of nutrient and heavy metal loads from precipitation occurring in western Monroe County.
    • Long Pond Monroe County, New York

      Makarewicz, Joseph C.; Nowak, Matthew J.; The College at Brockport (2010-01-01)
      Long Pond, located on Lake Ontario near Rochester, New York, is surrounded by a mix of residential development, state park, and protected wildlife areas. Land use within the watershed is a mix of suburbia, including the Village of Spencerport, and agriculture. The waters of Long Pond are considered hypereutrophic, meaning it is very productive due to high nutrient loading. This productivity is likely due to nonpoint sources and the point source represented by the Spencerport Sewage Treatment Plant which releases advanced secondary sewage effluent into a tributary of Long Pond (Makarewicz 2000). Nuisance algae, bacterial abundance, and algal mat development near Long Pond along the southern shoreline of Lake Ontario were evident. This short report provides a synopsis of data collected monthly from May through September (2003 to 2009) on the water quality of Long Pond and the lakeside (swimmable depth) of Lake Ontario near the mouth of the pond.