• Objectivity and Nonfiction

      Brownson, Carol; SUNY College at Fredonia (1983-01-01)
    • Objectivity and the Transactional Theory of Perception

      Freeman, Eugene; San Jose State College (1972-01-01)
      The visual demonstrations of Professor Adelbert Ames support the transactional theory of perception. This theory asserts that the very contents of our sense experiences are shaped by our past experiences, as well as our expectations of future experiences. This theory, in turn, supports a critical realism about the relationship between perception and reality.
    • Official Secrets and the Right to Know

      Kane, Peter E.; The College at Brockport (1983-01-01)
    • On Being in the Mind

      Firth, Roderick; Harvard University (1971-01-01)
      There is exactly one good reason to prefer dualism to the identity theory, and it is is this: whereas brain events occur in a particular spatial location inside the head, it is nonsensical to say that mental events occur in any particular location. Professor Shaffer’s other objections to the identity theory are either parasitic on this one, or else unsuccessful.
    • On Judging Epistemic Credibility: Is Social Identity Relevant?

      Martin Alcoff,; Syracuse University (1999-01-01)
      On what basis should we make an epistemic assessment of another’s authority to impart knowledge? Is social identity a legitimate feature to take into account when assessing epistemic reliability? This paper argues that, in some cases, social identity is a relevant feature to take into account in assessing a person’s credibility.
    • On Keating on the Competitive Motif in Athletics and Playful Activity

      Osterhoudt, Robert G.; University of Minnesota (1973-01-01)
    • On Sparshott’s ‘Vision and Dream in the Cinema’

      Glickman, Jack; The College at Brockport (1971-01-01)
      I agree with much of Professor Sparshott’s argument. I would add that when film is not taken as a recording of events that occurred, it is taken as a recording of events that were contrived; and that it is taken as a recording entails that no film is taken as present time. When we are caught up in viewing a film, we are primarily concerned with the story. Our fundamental concern is not with the film’s space and time, but with certain characters in human situations. Our main concern is with human experience.
    • On the Banality of Literary Truths

      Kivy, Peter; Rutgers University (1997-01-01)
      The propositional theory of literary truth says that the purpose of literary works is to express propositions. One objection to this theory is that the propositions that can be extracted from literary works are too banal to constitute the purpose of those works. This paper defends the propositional theory against this objection.
    • On the Proper Interpretation of Indian Religion and Philosophy

      Riepe, Dan; State University of New York at Buffalo (1972-01-01)
      This paper opposes Professor Potter’s idealistic interpretation of Indian philosophy. By contrast, I defend a Marxist, historical materialist interpretation of Indian philosophy.
    • On Understanding Indian Philosophical Thinking

      Mathur, D. C.; The College at Brockport (1972-01-01)
      Professor Potter interprets Indian philosophy as mainly concerned with moksa or transcendental freedom. Professor Riepe offers a Marxist interpretation of Indian philosophy. The aim of this paper is to identify the strengths and limitations of each of these two views.
    • On Weiss on Records and on the Significance of Athletic Records

      Fraleigh, Warren; The College at Brockport (1972-01-01)
      Athletic records cannot provide complete insight into the nature of an athletic event. However, certainly they can provide at least some approximation of what happened, and that is enough to justify the significant interest that we take in athletic records.
    • On Weiss on Records, Athletic Activity, and the Athlete

      Schacht, Richard; University of Illinois (1972-01-01)
      Professor Weiss and I agree in denying that the end or goal of athletic activity can be adequately characterized in terms of setting records. However, we seem to disagree about the fundamental nature and goal of athletic activity. Professor Weiss’s athlete strikes me as a kind of fanatic, whose athletic activity excludes other goals and projects. By contrast, I would argue that the goal of athletic activity is the intrinsic enjoyment that one may derive from it, and this goal is perfectly compatible with having many other goals and projects in life.
    • One is not Born but Becomes a Person: The Importance of Philosophical Mothering

      Whiting, Jennifer; University of Toronto (2006-01-01)
      Annette Baier is my philosophical foremother. This paper examines Baier’s views on such topics as personal identity and philosophical methodology. It also examines the idea of motherhood, and the various forms that it takes.
    • Ontological Possibilties: Sport as Play

      Kretchmar, Scott; The College at Brockport (1972-01-01)
      It is often thought that sport is highly incompatible with play, since the competitiveness of sport requires a degree of seriousness and commitment that are at odds with the freedom of play. However, this paper will argue that the competitive fullness of sport is compatible with play, even if not perfectly coextensive with it.
    • Parfit’s ‘Triple Theory’ and its Troubles

      McNaughton, David; Rawling, Piers; Florida State University (2014-01-01)
    • Patient Morality: Compliance, Perserverance and Other Athletic Virtues

      Ruddick, William; New York University (1983-01-01)
    • Philosophical Theories of Human Nature

      Sparshott, Francis; University of Toronto (1988-01-01)
    • Philosophy and Exploration of the Solar System

      Munevar, Gonzalo; Evergreen State College (1998-01-01)
      The search for extra terrestrial intelligence (SETI) raises several questions in the philosophy of science, especially in relation to artificial intelligence and biology. This paper explores these questions.
    • Philosophy and the Curriculum

      Scheffler, Israel; Harvard University (1971-01-01)
      There are many ways in which philosophy can contribute to the improvement of education. This paper proposes one particular contribution. Those who are studying to be teachers should be taught some of the philosophy that is related to the discipline that they will teach. There are four ways in which this can contribute to their education. First, it will give an analytical description of the forms of thought employed in their discipline. Second, it will provide some evaluation and criticism of those same forms of thought. Third, it will analyze some specific materials in such a way as to systematize them and illustrate these forms of thought. Fourth, it will provide an interpretation of these forms of thought that is accessible to the novice.