• Lear and Nature

      Cohen, Marshall; The Rockefeller University (1970-01-01)
      Morris Weitz is mistaken in his interpretation of King Lear. The distinction between good and evil is maintained clearly and sharply throughout the play, and nature actually provides the key to the difference between the two.
    • The Coinage of Man: King Lear and Camus’ Stranger

      Weitz, Morris; Brandeis University (1970-01-01)
      In Shakespeare’s King Lear, the universe is indifferent to human values, but human values are of the utmost importance for human life. Good and evil are not built into the fabric of nature. Rather, they rest of human prerogative. However, this does not diminish the importance of human values for human life. The plot of King Lear charts Lear’s own progress through the many stages of this realization.
    • Weitz on the Coinage of Man

      Sparshott, F. E.; Victoria College, University of Toronto (1970-01-01)
      The events in Shakespeare’s King Lear are not represented as typical, nor are the judgments made in the play represented as wise or reliable. This complicates any attempt to interpret the play as making the sorts of claims that Professor Weitz attributes to it.