• Are Women Morally Different from Men?

      Slote, Michael; University of Miami (2004-01-01)
      In recent years there has been a surge of interest in the differences between men and women. Some recent work appears to show that men and women differ in the ways in which they approach moral issues. This paper considers the implications of this research for moral philosophy. It is argued that this research does not undermine the idea of a single morality that applies equally to both men and women.
    • Is the Feminist Critique of Reason Rational

      Martin Alcoff, Linda; Syracuse University (1996-01-01)
      Recent criticism of feminist philosophy poses a dilemma. Feminism is taken to be a substantive set of empirical claims and political commitments, whereas philosophy is taken to be a discipline of thought organized by the pursuit of truth, but uncommitted to any particular truth. This paper responds to this dilemma, and defends the project of feminist philosophy.
    • Justice and Utility: Who Cares?

      Held, Virginia (1996-01-01)
      In recent decades, the dominant moral theories have been deontological and consequentialist. Also in the last few decades, feminist moral theory has developed. Is feminist moral theory distinctive, or is it just a version of one of these other types of theory? This paper discusses this issue.
    • On Judging Epistemic Credibility: Is Social Identity Relevant?

      Martin Alcoff,; Syracuse University (1999-01-01)
      On what basis should we make an epistemic assessment of another’s authority to impart knowledge? Is social identity a legitimate feature to take into account when assessing epistemic reliability? This paper argues that, in some cases, social identity is a relevant feature to take into account in assessing a person’s credibility.
    • Where is the Woman in Feminist Theory? The Case of Aesthetics

      Hein, Hilde (1990-01-01)
      This paper argues that feminism, as a theory, is a pattern of thinking that is not fundamentally about women, although it begins with a gendered perspective. It is, rather, an alternative way of theorizing about a host of topics that include but are not limited to women.