• Teaching Said: Culture Discourse Meets Culture Critique

      Davila, Carl; The College at Brockport (2010-01-01)
      This chapter from Counterpoints: Edward Said's Legacy discusses teaching Said in an undergraduate setting today.
    • The Bobsled Controversy and Squaw Valley’s Olympic Winter Games

      Wakefield, Wanda Ellen; The College at Brockport (2006-01-01)
      In 1957, the Squaw Valley Organizing Committee (SVOC) asked to eliminate bobsled due to what it said was the expense of construction and the likelihood that too few nations would enter sleds in the competition to justify the cost. The International Olympic Committee, headed by its President, Avery Brundage, and Chancellor, Otto Mayer, clearly accepted these arguments. They also, in the years between 1957 and 1960, refused to entertain ideas for alternative venues in which the competitions might have been held. Why did they do so? Was there something specific about bobsled that earned their scorn? Was there something about the winter sports in general to which Brundage and Mayer objected? And would the decision to eliminate bobsled races at the 1960 Olympic Winter Games have been different if the bob run had been another field on which to fight the Cold War? The purpose of this paper is to suggest answers to these questions.
    • The Case for Reform Antecedents for the Woman's Rights Movement

      Parker, Alison M.; The College at Brockport (2002-01-01)
    • 'The Picture of Health’: The Public Life and Private Ailments of Mary Church Terrell

      Parker, Alison M.; The College at Brockport (2013-04-01)
      THROUGHOUT AMERICAN HISTORY, both in slavery and as free women, African American women have confronted the problem of whether to disclose or hide their bodies’ illnesses and pains. For some, redemptive suffering and pain served as a powerful metaphor that openly inspired their reform activism.2 For others, the risk of disclosure seemed too great, especially if their physical problems had a sexual or reproductive dimension that could be construed in a racist light by the dominant white American society. In this paper, Alison Parker confronts the question of how, when, and why Mary (Mollie) Church Terrell privatized pain and illness.
    • Twentieth-Century Transformations: Sexualities Defined and Sexual Expression Expanded

      Parker, Alison M.; The College at Brockport (2014-06-01)
      Alison Parker reviews the following books: Margot Canaday. The Straight State: Sexuality and Citizenship in TwentiethCentury America. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 2009. xiv + 277 pp. Illustrations, notes, and index. $19.95 (paper). Leigh Ann Wheeler. How Sex. Became a Civil Liberty. New York: Oxford University Press, 2013. xiv + 327 pp. Notes, bibliography, and index. $34.95.
    • What We Do Expect the People Legislatively to Effect

      Parker, Alison M.; College at Brockport, State University of New York (2000-01-01)
      In this chapter, from the book Women and the Unstable State in Nineteenth-Century America, Alison Parker explores the radical political thought of Frances Wright and the implications of reactions to her egalitarianism.