Recent Submissions

  • Effectiveness of Solar Roadways

    Wharram, Miranda; Smith, Katie; Klein, Amanda; Lush, Colby; The College at Brockport (6/1/2014)
    This model represents what would happen if 4 households on a street all paved their driveways with the “Solar Roadways” solar panels. The purpose is to discover if this little neighborhood would create enough kWh with the solar panels to supply all 4 houses with enough electricity. The primary file is a lesson plan, accompanied by supplemental files. In the supplemental zipped files, you will find: Student worksheets Lesson plan Powerpoint presentations
  • Pathogen Transmission Rates

    Scipione, Nicole; Dubay, Joshua; Baxter, Bridget; Gardinier, Jennifer; The College at Brockport (6/1/2014)
    This model would be used in a classroom to demonstrate the different methods of pathogen transmission. The accompanying worksheet contains questions for pre-assessment, activity, and post-assessment. There are four different worksheets to represent the multiple modes of transmission. Each worksheet is designed to demonstrate a different mode of pathogen transmission and is will be utilized by a different group of students. Upon experimentation, students will export the data from the AgentSheets plots into Excel. Using Excel, students will be able to create graphs. After each group has created their graph and analyzed their data, they will present their findings to the class and compare their data. After presenting, there will be a discussion about the various graphs and their corresponding rates. Functions presented as expressions can model many important phenomena. Two important families of functions characterized by laws of growth are linear functions, which grow at a constant rate, and exponential functions, which grow at a constant percent rate. Using prior knowledge of graphing, functions, and rate of change, students will work as a class to determine which method of transmission results in the most rapid spread of pathogens. The primary file is a lesson plan, accompanied by supplemental files. In the supplemental zipped files, you will find: Student worksheets Lesson plan Powerpoint presentations
  • Safe Imaging of Internal Organs

    Lash, Stephanie; Burleigh, Nathanial; Moulin, Katrijn; The College at Brockport (6/1/2014)
    The purpose of this model is to demonstrate the common ion effect on the solubility of salts. In short the common ion effect states that the addition of a salt to a solution containing some common ion will decrease the degree of dissociation of a weak electrolyte in solution. This effect is especially important when creating the Barium contrast solution ingested by patients for some medical imaging procedures. The barium sulfate in this material is not harmful to the body, however some will dissociate into relatively harmless sulfate ions and toxic barium ions. In order to make the solution safe for consumption sodium sulfate is added in order to bind the dissociated barium and make the solution non-toxic. This model will be used in conjunction with an exploratory lesson discussing the common ion effect along with the application of calculus concepts. Students will begin by researching a barium swallow and the negative effects of barium. Student will then do some pre-model calculations on the associated worksheet using the solubility product rules and their knowledge of chemistry to calculate the amount of Barium Sulfate to add to 500 ml of water in order to create a 2% wt/wt Barium Sulfate solution and the concentration of free Barium in the solution. Students will then open the project “ContrastSimulation” and the worksheet labeled “Contrast”. After pressing play students will see the Barium Sulfate molecules diffuse through the solution, with some molecules dissociating into barium and sulfate ions. Students should make note of the number of Barium ions after 30 – 45 seconds and then end the simulation. Students will then open the worksheet “ContrastAndSodiumHydroxide” and allow it to run as with the “Contrast” sheet again noting the Barium level after 30-45 seconds. The remaining worksheets should be explored in this manner starting with “ContrastAndBariumHydroxide”, then “ContrastAndPotasiumBromide”, and finally “ContrastAndSodiumSulfate” always noting the Barium level when the simulation is stopped. From exploration of the model students should realize that the salt they should add to their contrast material is Sodium Sulfate. Armed with this information and the rules for calculating concentrations based on solubility products students will then calculate the minimum amount of Sodium Sulfate to add to their contrast solution. The primary file is a lesson plan, accompanied by supplemental files. In the supplemental zipped files, you will find: Student worksheets Lesson plan Powerpoint presentations
  • Tooth Enamel

    Dubay, Joshua; Thresh, Lauren; Kreb, David; The College at Brockport (1/1/2015)
    The purpose of this model is to demonstrate the natural phenomena of acid molecules eroding the enamel of an individuals tooth. Through this lesson students will identify pH levels of common acidic foods and drinks. Student will also determine the significance of saliva to the maintenance of pH of the mouth. Students will discover that the longer acidic molecules are exposed to the enamel of a tooth the percentage of healthy enamel on a tooth decreases. When healthy enamel is eroded, dentin is exposed, which gives teeth a yellow appearance. Students will use the model to compare the relation of acidic beverages to the percentage of healthy enamel.
  • Medieval Conquest

    Harrington, Aaron; The College at Brockport (1/4/2006)
    Create an interactive “video game” that required the physics user to apply the laws of physics. -The physics user must apply their knowledge of projectile motion in order to defend his/her castle against the approaching army.
  • Firework Show

    Ordiway, Kaitlin A.; Wharram, Miranda; Lauffer, Steven; The College at Brockport (6/11/2015)
    Our model allows student to create a firework show in order to distract zombies long enough to get food and get back to their home base. Students will use their knowledge of emission, light and energy to determine the best firework show possible.
  • Sickle Cell Anemia

    Dubay, Joshua; Krebs, David; Thresh, Lauren; The College at Brockport (1/1/2015)
    What is Sickle Cell Anemia? The purpose of this model is to deepen student understanding of the human body through investigating the structure and function of red blood cells in the human circulatory system. The students will compare and contrast structure and function between normal red blood cells and sickle blood cells and will learn how disruptions in one body system can disrupt homeostasis in other body systems (conditions of stability and determinants of change). Students will engage in mathematics to support their observations and inferences founded within the simulation. Data will be collected to construct linear graphs and build a relation to model the relationship between the number of cells and amount of oxygen transported. This relation will be used to interpret and explain the effects of Sickle Cell Anemia.
  • Molecular Collisions

    Ordiway, Kaitlin A.; Wharram, Miranda; Lauffer, Steven; The College at Brockport (6/11/2015)
    Our model is designed to simulate molecular collisions and prompt students to question the factors affecting collisions. It brings together chemistry, physics, and mathematics. Through the sliders and monitors on our interface page, students will be able to observe as well as manipulate the factors that affect inelastic collisions between two different molecules. Using the known kinetic energy equations and the velocity found from the frames per second, students will be able to calculate the distance traveled.
  • Lionfish as an Example of Invasive Species Ecology

    Gardinier, Jennifer; Morgan, Myra; Ramos, Carolina; The College at Brockport (7/1/2015)
    This computational model of lionfish ecology allows students to explore the effects of introducing an invasive species into a previously stable ecosystem. The stable ecosystem is represented by the coral reef habitat and clownfish population. When the lionfish are introduced, the students can graphically visualize the decline in clownfish population and subsequent destruction of the coral reef. By increasing the water temperature by 2 degrees, the students witness the increased reproductive fitness of the lionfish and resulting rapid decline in clownfish population and the coral reef environment. The model generates data which is displayed graphically and used for mathematical modeling of population biology.
  • Erosion: wins races by a landslide

    Allocco, Maggie H.; Moulin, Katrijn; The College at Brockport (1/1/2015)
    This model demonstrates the effects of erosion on soil. Users are able to adjust both rain (water) and wind intensity as well as rates of erosion for both. There is also an option to add different amounts of vegetative land cover; allowing users to see how areas with land cover are not as susceptible to erosion as open areas. The lesson plan has students run multiple trials, record data, create graphs and lines of best fit. The line of best fit is than used to make predictions and estimations. This was designed as a supplement to an erosion lesson and does not include all factors that affect erosion.
  • Human Impact on Environment Using GIS

    Arrendell, Robert; The College at Brockport (8/9/2006)
    Objectives: Students will be able to plot specific data points regarding a human impact on the environment problem of their choice in a given geographical area near the school campus using the ArcGIS program.
  • Radioactive Decay

    Case, Ryan; Pritchard, Jayson; State University of New York College at Brockport (6/20/2016)
    The purpose of this model is to simulate the decay of radioactive nuclei to the stable isotope Lead-206. First and foremost, the model is designed to illustrate the concept of a half-life, which is the amount of time it takes for half a given quality of nuclei to decay to the next nuclei. In addition it also demonstrates that different radioisotopes have different half-lives than one another, and that the mass is conserved in nuclear reactions but not necessarily the number of protons, neutrons, or nuclei.
  • Particle Transport

    Slossar, Samantha; Babocsi, Jamye; Ko, Chuck; The College at Brockport (6/1/2015)
    The particle transport simulation is designed to help students gain a deeper level of understanding of the relationship between velocity and particle size. Students will be able to manipulate the velocity and particle size to see if the particle will move. The mathematical component will require the students to construct a particle graph using the simulator and Earth Science Reference Table (ESRT).
  • Chemical Weathering

    Kreppel, Elizabeth; Ordiway, Kaitlin A.; State University of New York College at Brockport (6/20/2016)
    This model shows the effects of acid rain on different rock types.
  • Exploring Density

    Babocsi, Jamye; Wallace, Agnieszka; State University of New York College at Brockport (6/20/2016)
    This density model is designed to allow students to explore how mass, volume, and temperature directly affect the density of an object or liquid
  • Insolation and Ecosystem

    Allocco, Margaret; Haller, Chris; State University of New York College at Brockport (6/20/2016)
    The purpose of this model is to demonstrate the impact of angle of insolation and precipitation on the health of a specific climate zone’s ecosystem
  • Biomagnification and Bioaccumulation

    Linder, Grace; Thresh, Lauren; State University of New York College at Brockport (6/20/2016)
    This computational model is intended to demonstrate how micropollutants effect ecology via the living environment concepts of biomagnification and bioaccumulation. Specifically, this model shows how concentrations of a micropollutant change throughout an aquatic food chain.
  • IB Mathematics Standard Level - Statistics Unit - Online Instruction

    Miles, Alexa (5/15/2020)
    This statistics unit is designed to be delivered 100% remotely for IB Math SL students. For our class, this was Unit 11. There are five lessons of content in this unit being, 11.1 Histograms and Boxplots, 11.2 Variance and Standard Deviation, 11.3 Probability Distributions and Expected Value, 11.4 Binomial Distribution, and 11.5 Normal Distribution. Each lesson consists of one Edpuzzle video for the students to watch and take notes on and one worksheet style practice assignment (informal assessment) for the students to complete. There is one formal assessment after lesson 2 and a larger (two-day) formal assessment after lesson 5. The assessments are typical exam style assessments. There are two days of review built in before the large end-of-unit assessment including a Quizizz game and a sheet of IB review problems. Each day should be about one hour of work time. Full delivery of this unit should take 10 hours.
  • Decomposition and Growth

    Allocco, Margaret; Haller, Chris; State University of New York College at Brockport (6/20/2016)
    This model shows is a simple representation of decomposition and growth. As students move the arrow over different sprites in the model, the sprites will “talk” asking questions and providing information to the user.
  • Titration

    Case, Ryan; Pritchard, Jayson; State University of New York College at Brockport (6/20/2016)
    This model is meant to represent what is going on during a titration at the particle level

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