Collections in this community

  • Dissenting Voices

    Dissenting Voices is a student engineered eJournal collaboratively designed, authored, and published by undergraduate Women and Gender Studies majors in connection with their Women and Gender Studies Senior Seminar at SUNY ...
  • #History: A Journal of Student Research

    #History: A Journal of Student Research is a student driven, peer-reviewed, electronic journal that publishes articles by graduate and undergraduate students from any accredited college or university.
  • Jigsaw

    Jigsaw is a student literary magazine, published by the English Club at The College at Brockport, SUNY. It accepts students' writings and artworks. Jigsaw is published annually in the spring.
  • Journal of Literary Onomastics

    The Journal of Literary Onomastics is the only scholarly periodical devoted to the study of names in literary texts.
  • Literary Onomastics Studies

    Literary Onomastics Studies was published from 1974 to 1989 as “the official journal of the proceedings of the annual Conference on Literary Onomastics,” held during those years at SUNY Brockport or in Rochester, New York.
  • McNair Summer Research Journal

    The mission of the Ronald E McNair Post-baccalaureate Program at SUNY College at Brockport is to provide disadvantaged undergraduate college students with preparation for doctoral study. To that end, we provide academic, ...
  • Philosophic Exchange

    Philosophic Exchange is published by the Center for Philosophic Exchange, at the College at Brockport. The Center for Philosophic Exchange was founded by SUNY Chancellor Samuel Gould in 1969 to conduct a continuing program ...
  • The Seneca Falls Dialogues Journal

    The Seneca Falls Dialogues Journal is a multidisciplinary, peer reviewed, online journal that grows out of the Biennial Seneca Falls Dialogues conference.
  • The Spectrum: A Scholars Day Journal

    The Spectrum: A Scholars Day Journal, is a faculty juried, cross-disciplinary, electronic journal. Its goal is the publication of outstanding, student produced scholarship presented at the College at Brockport annual ...

Recent Submissions

  • The Spectrum: a Scholars Day Journal Volume 7 (Spring 2021)

    Executive Editor, Mitchell Christensen; Managing Editor, Mary Jo Orzech (SUNY Brockport, 2021)
    Scholars Day at SUNY Brockport was held online for two years during the Covid pandemic (2020 and 2021). The online format was challenging for students as well as conference organizers. Courses were forced to pivot to online learning almost overnight. Masks, weekly Covid testing and 6’ social distancing were the norm for those on campus. The online version of Scholars Day included a mix of posters, videos and more. This 2021 special issue of The Spectrum includes a small sample of student posters published to recognize the quality and commitment to student scholarly and creative activity that continued throughout this period.
  • Evaluating the Performance of Caching Strategies in Diverse Information-centric Network Settings

    Forbes, Rhonda-Lee T.; Kulkami, Dr. Adita (SUNY Brockport, 2021-04)
  • Growth and Seed Formation of Brachypodium sylvaticum in Genesee County, NY

    Morin, Zachary; Graham, Andie (SUNY Brockport, 2021-04)
  • When We Speak Up: Factors That Predict Willingness to Confront Expressions of Racial Prejudice

    Testone, Julianna M.; Minster, Korrine I.; Andrus, Tyra; Stroman-Surita, Aaliyah; Ratcliff, Jennifer (SUNY Brockport, 2021-04)
  • Insight of the Deepwater Sculpin Reproduction in Lake Ontario

    Ludwig, Jarrod; Weidel, Brian; O'Malley, Brian; Connerton, Mike; Rinchard, Jacques (SUNY Brockport, 2021-04)
  • Racism and the Discourse of Phobias: Negrophobia, Xenophobia and More---Dialogue with Kim and Sundstrom

    Garcia, J. L .A. (2020)
    The article discusses recism as a topic for conceptual analysis, touching on other phobias as well.
  • Intersecting Identities: Middle Eastern Women in Dual Cultures

    Al Sharifi, Zahraa (2021-01)
    Dual cultures are an experience known only to people who live in two cultures. I was inspired by my poetry and the experiences that I and my family went through as women as well as the stories of Middle Eastern women I read. They lived in dual cultures and experienced violence in their homelands alongside wars and sexism from both cultures they lived in. In the Western culture, they also experienced racism. I, as an Iraqi, tend to turn to poetry to express the variety of injustices I observed, and my people tend to do that. We are well known for our poetry that speaks about our experiences.
  • Disability Representations in High School English Curriculum

    Cunningham, Grace (2021-01)
    This essay explores the common misconceptions of disability, why disability representation is important, and provides an example of disability studies application through the novel The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini (2003).
  • When I Realized I was the Gay Best Friend: Queer Media Representation and the “Coming Out” Process

    Martinez, Myah (2021-01)
    This essay examines queer representation in widespread media and its impact during the coming out process. I examine three coming out stories in popular media and use my own story to shine a light on the challenges of coming out as LGBTQIA+. I hope readers who are struggling with coming out can use these examples to voice their LGBTQIA+ stories.
  • Is Our Medical Community Failing Women? The PTSD Epidemic among Women in the United States

    Puleo, Erica (2021-01)
    PTSD has become fairly recognized within the United States Medical Community. Experts have begun to expand PTSD research beyond the confines of PTSD due to war and have begun looking at PTSD in the civilian populations. Due to this advancement in research, we now know that certain identities, like gender, can put someone at a higher risk for developing PTSD. In this essay I argue that even though we are aware that gender, and more specifically being a woman, can increase someone’s chances of developing PTSD, we still see women being misdiagnosed and mistreated by medical professionals. I examine this perspective through an analysis of current PTSD literature regarding women and compare it to my own experience as a young woman who sought out PTSD diagnosis and treatment.
  • Looking into the Prevalence of Substance Abuse among the LGBTQIA+ Population

    Levitsky, Naomi (2021-01)
    In this essay, I explore the prevalence of and reasons for substance abuse among the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer/Questioning, Intersex, & Asexual, or LGBTQIA+ community and ways to lessen the stigma and provide for more adequate treatment opportunities.
  • STOP: The Sexualization of Women & Girls

    Muir, Catherine (2021-01)
    This essay argues that the current mainstream Western beauty ideal in the United States both fetishizes the prepubescent female body and infantilizes the adult female body. This intersection works together to create impossible standards for women and girls and ultimately can perpetuate sexual violence against women and girls.
  • Varied Experiences of Fat Bodies

    Ibrahim, Hawa (2021-01)
    This essay argues that the varied experiences of fat bodies are not reflected in the media or public spaces of our society. In creating a world that physically has no room for fat bodies and is socially unkind and unwelcoming, the varied experiences cannot be told let alone be allowed to be understood. Voices of those who are fat need to be uplifted to create more accessible spaces for all.
  • Mental Health for Incarcerated Women: How is America Treating Them?

    Gillett, Nax (2021-01)
    This essay examines the effects of incarceration on the mental health of female inmates and comments on what America could be doing to help them. In this essay the topic of female incarceration is viewed through an intersectional lens in tandem with systemic racism and oppression. It begins with a personal narrative describing the life of a girl named Mar, who was wronged by the system, and moves into a discussion on the failings of our current system. This essay focuses on topics through the timeline of incarceration; entry into the system, life while incarcerated, and finally, life after incarceration. Each topic is discussed in depth and includes ways to improve standards for incarcerated women and assist them in receiving proper mental health care.
  • Dissenting Voices Volume 10, Issue 1 (Spring 2021) Complete Issue

    Gillett, Nax; Ibrahim, Hawa; Muir, Catherine; Levitsky, Naomi; Puleo, Erica; Martinez, Myah; Cunningham, Grace; Al Sharifi, Zahraa (2021-01)
    Table of Contents – Mental Health for Incarcerated Women: How is America Treating Them? Nax Gillett, p. 1 / Varied Experiences of Fat Bodies. Hawa Ibrahim, p. 17 / STOP: The Sexualization of Women and Girls. Catherine Muir, p. 25 / Looking into the Prevalence of Substance Abuse among the LGBTQIA+ Population. Naomi Levitsky, p. 39 / Is Our Medical Community Failing Women? The PTSD Epidemic among Women in the United States. Erica Puleo, p. 53 / When I Realized I was the Gay Best Friend: Queer Media Representation and the “Coming Out” Process. Myah Martinez, p. 65 / Disability Representations in High School English Curriculum. Grace Cunningham, p. 81 / Intersecting Identities: Middle Eastern Women in Dual Cultures. Zahraa Al Sharifi, p. 91.
  • The Influence of Subtle and Blatant Prejudice on Group Identity

    Krolikowski, Alex; Champlin, Dell P.; The College at Brockport (2012-04-19)
    Recent research on social distancing and intergroup relations focuses on the black sheep effect—the notion that individuals will distance themselves from deviant group members—and out-group discrimination (Johns et al., 2005), but does not examine the relationship between the black sheep effect and negative attitudes. Additionally, research suggests that the degree to which prejudice is detected varies with the type of prejudice expressed—blatant or subtle (Meertens & Pettigrew, 1997). The current research tested whether the type of sexual prejudice expressed by members of one’s in-group, influences the amount that individuals identify with their in-group and the individual expressing prejudice. Participants were exposed to either blatant or subtle prejudice and completed several questionnaires assessing identification with their in-group and the individual expressing prejudice. Results revealed that exposure to blatant prejudice was related to greater social distancing from the individual expressing prejudice and one’s in-group than exposure to subtle prejudice.
  • Hercules: the Spiritual Emphasis in Euripides

    Head, James; The College at Brockport (2012-04-19)
    Hercules: the secular and the spiritual, examines the work of two ancient playwrights, Seneca and Euripides, comparing their individual treatments of a common Hercules tragedy narrative. Although both writers are considered existing within the era of classical literary history, there is a gap of nearly 400 years between when Euripides wrote Hercules for a Greek Dionysia Festival, and the version that Seneca wrote while serving as a statesman in Rome. Likewise, there is a noticeable difference in how each play treats the topics of spirituality and religion. This essay explores the choices that each playwright makes concerning their depiction of gods, mortal men, and the origins of violent madness, positing that Euripides’ work is rooted in deep religious traditions while Seneca modifies his source material to tell a secular tale of caution and cultural morality.

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