Now showing items 1-20 of 5346

    • Benthic Macroinvertebrate communities of Southwestern Lake Ontario Following Invasion of Dreissens

      Haynes, James M.; Stewart, Timothy W. (International Association of Great Lakes Research, 1994)
      Changes in benthic macroinvertebrate communities inhabiting natural cobble and artificial reef substrates in southwestern Lake Ontario were quantified before and after the invasion of dreissenid mussels in the late 1980s. Dreissenids comprised 79% and 93% of the cobble and reef communities in 1991-1992 (post-invasion) and replaced the amphipod, Gammarus fasciatus, which was the most abundant species at both habitats in 1983 (pre-invasion). Total abundance of non-Dreissena species was significantly greater in 1991-1992 than in 1983. Comparisons of macroinvertebrate community similarity in 1983 and 1991-1992 indicated that previously established taxa did not change substantially between sampling periods, but their proportions in the community did. Although many factors may have contributed to the changes we observed, our results support theories that Dreissena is facilitating energy transfer to the benthos by pseudofecal/ fecal deposition and that mussel colonies are providing additional habitat for other invertebrate taxa.
    • . Benthic macroinvertebrate communities in southwestern Lake Ontario following invasion of Dreissena and Echinogammarus: 1983-2000.

      Haynes, James M.; Tisch, Nancy A.; Mayer, Christine M.; Rhyne, Randall S. (Journal of the North American Benthologic Society, 2005)
      Benthic macroinvertebrate communities were quantified at natural cobble and artificial reef sites in Lake Ontario in 1983 (7 y pre-Dreissena invasion) and in 1991-1992 and 1999-2000 (1-2 and 9-10 y post-Dreissena invasion, respectively). Overall, the natural cobble community had higher species diversity and community abundance than the artificial reef community. While taxonomic composition of both communities remained consistent during the study period, organism abundance (excluding Dreissena) increased sharply from 1983 to 1991-1992, and that all taxa declined to 1983 levels by 1999-2000. From 1991-1992 to 1999-2000, Dreissena bugensis, which mostly replaced D. polymorpha, and Echinogammarus ischnus (all invasive species) appeared in the studied community. We conclude that the transition from D. polymorpha to D. bugensis and processes associated with the ongoing oligotrophication of Lake Ontario are responsible for the reduced density of large-bodied Dreissena in the nearshore region of the lake, and that changes in the Dreissena population are largely responsible for changes in the non-Dreissena benthic macroinvertebrate community.
    • Survey of Buttonwood Creek, Monroe County, NY to Determine Habitat Availability for and Relative Abundance of a Species of Special Concern, the Pirate Perch (Aphredoderus sayanus)

      Haynes, James M. (SUNY Brockport Department of Biological Sciences, 1994-06-02)
      We determined how much suitable habitat for Pirate Perch remains in Buttonwood Creek, sampled those habitats to determine where the species still exists in the creek, and predicted the likely impact of a bridge replacement and associated channel alterations on the Pirate Perch population
    • Preliminary Survey of Fish Communities in Three Tributaries of the Braddock Bay Watershed.

      Haynes, James M. (SUNY Brockport, Department of Biological Sciences, 1987-11)
      SUNY Brockport collaborated with Monroe County, New York to assess fish communities in three tributaries of Braddock Bay with different development histories: Northrup Creek, Larkin Creek and Buttonwood Creek.
    • Building Global Relationships: OER and Collaborative Online International Learning Courses

      Orzech, Mary Jo; Zhang, Jie; Kegler, Jennifer; Pearlman (University of Rochester), Ann; Greenfield (Syracuse University), Victoria (Sage Journals, 2023)
      Using Open Educational Resources (OER) in Collaborative Online International Learning (COIL) courses provides students and faculty the opportunity to share content, enhance knowledge, and develop intercultural competence across geopolitical and other boundaries. Faculty perceptions at the research site regarding benefits and challenges of using OER are consistent with positive findings of other OER research that validate its potential. This case study describes experiences of two college courses taught with different international partners. It shares the journey of co-planning, implementing, and revising assignments highlighting OER instructional materials. Technology and accessibility considerations influence the curricular decisions for each course. They demonstrate how the timely availability of relevant OER content can be particularly impactful for international learning environments like COIL. The article underscores the faculty-librarian-instructional designer collaboration throughout the project and offers suggestions for future study.
    • Creating a Local Government Manager Position in New York: A Summary of Four Case Profiles

      Hattery, Michael; Watt, Celia (SUNY Brockport, Department of Public Administration, 2022)
      This policy brief summarizes the efforts of four communities in New York that took initiative to consider change in the administration of their local government. In particular they assessed the changes needed to create the position of a central manager or administrator for their communities. These local initiatives were reviewed and summarized in 2020-22 by the Public Management Program (PMP), Department of Public Administration, SUNY Brockport.
    • Creating a Manager/Administrator Position in New York State: Legal Considerations

      Hattery, Michael; Watt, Celia (SUNY Brockport. Department of Public Administration, 2024)
      This policy brief provides a summary of the options available in New York state law for cities, towns, and villages to create the position of manager or administrator. As might be expected, there are common features and variations across the three municipal types in the state.1 This brief on legal considerations is a supplement to recent work summarizing the efforts of four communities in New York that more recently took initiative to consider change in the administration of their local government. In particular they assessed the changes needed to create the position of a central manager or administrator for their communities. These local initiatives were reviewed and summarized in 2020-22 by the Public Management Program (PMP), Department of Public Administration, SUNY Brockport. Reference to the four cases and an overall summary are provided at the end of this policy brief.
    • Tobacco/Vaping Unit Plan Sketch

      Kenneally, Madeline (SUNY Brockport Department of Public Health and Health Education, 2023)
    • The DECIDE model: A guide to better health related decision making

      Fasce, Chris (SUNY Brockport, Department of Education and Human Development, 2023)
      This publication has been checked against freely available accessibility tools and deemed accessible. Should you have a problem accessing it, please email archives@brockport.edu for assistance.
    • Sex Education: A Plan for Students and Teachers to Stay Informed

      Dorval, Richard E. (SUNY Brockport, Department of Public Health and Health Administration, 2023)
    • Guide Students to Learn and Experience Effects of Alcohol and Other Drugs

      Cunningham, Courtney (Department of Public Health and Health Education, 2023)
    • The Effects That Sport Specialization has on Youth Athletes

      Spulnick, Michael S (SUNY Brockport, Department of Kinesiology, Sport Studies, and Physical Education, 2023-12-28)
      Youth sport specialization is becoming more popular than ever. Many athletes, parents and coaches think that sport specialization is the best way to reach elite level status in a sport. However, athletes, parents and coaches don’t know all of the positive and negative effects of specialization in a sport. Whereas, sport specialization may help you gain skill development, it is also correlated with higher chances of overuse injuries, psychological stress, and burnout. The purpose of this study is to review the literature and investigate the effects of sport specialization on youth athletes. It was determined that specializing in a sport can allow an athlete to attain a higher level of performance. It was also determined that overuse injuries are the biggest disadvantage when specializing in a sport. Finally, it was determined that younger athletes are at more psychological and physical risk than older athletes.
    • The Effects That Sport Specialization has on Youth Athletes

      Spulnick, Michael S (SUNY Brockport Department of Kinesiology, Sport Studies, and Physical Education, 2023-12-28)
      Youth sport specialization is becoming more popular than ever. Many athletes, parents and coaches think that sport specialization is the best way to reach elite level status in a sport. However, athletes, parents and coaches don’t know all of the positive and negative effects of specialization in a sport. Whereas, sport specialization may help you gain skill development, it is also correlated with higher chances of overuse injuries, psychological stress, and burnout. The purpose of this study is to review the literature and investigate the effects of sport specialization on youth athletes. It was determined that specializing in a sport can allow an athlete to attain a higher level of performance. It was also determined that overuse injuries are the biggest disadvantage when specializing in a sport. Finally, it was determined that younger athletes are at more psychological and physical risk than older athletes.
    • The Global Experiences of Physical Education Teachers with Remote Instruction During the Covid-19 Pandemic

      Ferrante, Lorin (SUNY Brockport Department of Kinesiology, Sport Studies, and Physical Education, 2023-12-23)
      In the spring of 2020, countries around the world were forced to go into lockdown due to the Covid-19 pandemic. Schools were forced to close their doors and quickly shift from face to face to online instruction at all levels of education. Physical education teachers had to immediately transition from in-person classroom instruction to remote teaching without time for adequate planning and with little or no training. The purpose of this synthesis is to review the literature on the global experiences of physical education teachers with remote instruction during the Covid-19 pandemic.
    • The Role of Movement in the Classroom

      Michalak, Katherine L (SUNY Brockport, Department of Education and Human Development, 2024-01-11)
      The modern education system has formatted learning in a way that removes movement from a children’s day. Students go to school for 7 hours a day where they sit in desks and receive instruction. There are limited opportunities to move and use their bodies. This limited movement puts both children’s physical health and cognitive development at risk. Research has shown links between chronic exercise, cognition, and mental and physical health in children and adolescents (Graham et al, 2021). Studies have shown that the ages of 0 years old to 5 years old are a critical time for cognitive and behavioral development in humans (Mavilidi et al, 2021). During this time there is a large amount of brain growth and development. The basis for a healthy life style is, in part, built during this influential period in a child’s life. Additionally, physical activity can increase cognition and psychosocial health in children. The recommended duration of physical activity for children ages 3 – 5 is 180 minutes per day. This lack of exercise is not limited to the under 5 age bracket. Research shows that adolescents are also, on average, not getting enough daily exercise (James et al, 2017). The recommended exercise requirement for this age group is at least 60 minutes of physical activity each day (Damian et al, 2018). However, many children and adolescents also do not meet the daily suggested amount of physical activity. Therefore, integrating physical activity into the school day could have significant benefits to children’s and adolescent’s cognitive, mental, and physical health. It has been found that exercise, in short bouts, can help to improve overall health. Physical movement is integral to the development of all children. As children interact with their environment they gain motor, social, emotional, and cognitive skills (Lee et al, 2021). Often times, students need movement-based experiences in order to learn new information. Movement experiences give context and meaning to new information.
    • The Use of Vocabulary Learning Strategies in High School Science Classrooms

      Morales, Elizabeth Jasmin (SUNY Brockport Department of Education and Human Development, 2023-12-22)
      This capstone project explores various strategies that can be used in the science classroom to improve student’s vocabulary acquisition. As teachers will encounter students of varying reading levels, it’s important to find ways to best support these students in acquiring science content. Science teachers may not always think about the importance of teaching vocabulary and providing plentiful opportunities for students to practice with the vocabulary. One of the greatest difficulties that students encounter in science classes is the amount of Tier 3 vocabulary words they must learn, understand, and apply. It is recommended that science teachers explore various methods of explicit vocabulary instruction and the creation of activities that further support their students in gaining vocabulary knowledge.
    • POGIL Implementation in Middle School Chemistry

      Flint, Elliott (SUNY Brockport, Department of Education and Human Development, 2023-12-22)
      This capstone project explores the implementation of Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning (POGIL) in middle school chemistry, specifically focusing on the NGSS (Next Generation Science Standards) framework for MS-PS1 Matter and its Interactions. The study aimed to investigate the impact of POGIL methodology on students' understanding, engagement, and overall enjoyment of science. A diverse range of POGIL activities, aligned with NGSS standards, were integrated into the middle school chemistry curriculum. The research employed a mixed-methods approach, combining quantitative analysis of pre- and post-assessment scores with qualitative insights gathered through student surveys and classroom observations. The findings revealed a significant increase in students' understanding of key chemistry concepts, as evidenced by higher post-assessment scores. Additionally, the implementation of POGIL led to heightened levels of student engagement during classroom activities, with students actively participating in collaborative inquiry. The study also uncovered a notable rise in students' overall enjoyment of science, indicating that the POGIL approach positively impacted their attitudes toward learning and exploration. These results contribute valuable insights into the efficacy of POGIL in middle school chemistry education, emphasizing its potential to enhance both learning outcomes and students' general experiences in science classrooms. The success of this implementation underscores the importance of interactive and collaborative approaches in fostering a positive and enriching learning environment for middle school students.
    • The Importance of Formative Assessments in AP Physics 1

      Fink, Michael John (SUNY Brockport Department of Education and Human Development, 2023-12-14)
      This capstone project contains research on the importance of AP Physics 1, the courses importance in opening doors in stem to marginalized groups, and formative assessments in the course to help teachers create more opportunities for success in STEM courses for all students.
    • Support for Learning Mathematics Using the 5E Instructional Model

      Zaccardo, Steven (SUNY Brockport, Department of Education and Human Development, 2023-12-20)
      This curriculum project is designed to assist mathematics teachers in implementing the 5E Instructional Model into their lessons. The four consecutive lessons were taught in a special education algebra 1 setting and each lesson integrates the 5E method (engagement, exploration, explanation, elaboration, and evaluation) into graphing linear equations. Lesson 1 includes an introduction to finding points on a line. In lesson 2, students will take a deeper dive into the equation of a line and discover why a point is a solution to a linear equation. Lesson 3 moves onto slope and the many ways we can find slope when various information is given. Lesson 4 focuses on recalling information from the previous 3 lessons to incorporate what has been learned into the slope-intercept concept. In the end, this project engages students in learning linear equations using the 5E Instructional Model.
    • The Use of Information and Communications Technologies in High School Physics Classrooms

      Withey, Matthew James (SUNY Brockport, Department of Education and Human Development, 2023-12-14)
      There is a surprising lack of literature on how to implement information and communications technology in the classroom, despite the fact that it is almost universally believed to improve student learning. This paper explore fifteen ICT tools and how they impact student learning. It then provides recommendations for how to best implement them in the classroom.