• Venn Diagramming using Project Interactivate

      Heigl, Sarah; The College at Brockport (2006-08-10)
      Students use number sense and numeration to develop and understanding of multiple uses of number in the real world, the use of numbers to communicate mathematically, and the use of numbers in the development of mathematical ideas.
    • Verbal Versus Active Play Learning: Their Effectiveness on Symbol Recall in Three and Four-Year-Old Children

      Chepyator-Thomson, Jepkorir Rose; Dorman, Mark R.; The College at Brockport (1992-12-01)
      This study investigated the contribution of the motor activity learning medium (MALM) to the development of symbol recall in three and four-year-old children. Eighteen pre-schoolers from Gananda Day Care, in Macedon, New York, were used in this study. They were assigned to either a verbal learning group or an active learning group using a stratified random sampling technique. The children were pre-tested for prior knowledge of the symbols; pi, sigma, theta, and omega of the Greek alphabet. These symbols were taught to children in the verbal learning and active learning groups for thirty minutes for two consecutive days with verbal and active learning teaching methods respectively. A post-test was performed after the second day of instruction and the results were recorded. A retention follow-up test was performed ten days later and the results were recorded. The data were statistically analyzed with the Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test of Differences. While a post-test and a ten-day follow-up test indicated a nonsignificant difference between the verbal learning and the active learning groups in performance, both groups showed gains on test scores. Although the results failed to show statistically significant differences in symbol recall between the two teaching methods, the mean scores for the active play group were higher for both the posttest and follow-up measures. The results showed a positive trend in favor of the active play method.
    • Verification of day 4 through day 7 forecast for Buffalo and Rochester, NY

      Pfendler, Amanda; Niziol, Thomas A.; Rochette, Scott M.; National Weather Service, Buffalo, NY; NOAA/NWS Forecast Office; The College at Brockport (2002-01-01)
    • Veteran Teachers’ Perception of Changes over Time in the Kindergarten

      Begy, Gerald; Mercer, Patrick James; The College at Brockport (1992-05-01)
      The purpose of this study was to investigate and document the changes that kindergarten teachers have seen take place in kindergarten and to record kindergarten teachers' opinions of these changes. A pilot study was conducted to narrow down the changes that have taken place in kindergarten. Three kindergarten teachers with various years of teaching kindergarten were used. Ten common threads of commentary were chosen and used as the basis for the actual study. Seventeen kindergarten teachers with nine or more years of teaching experience in kindergarten were the subjects. All seventeen kindergarten teachers were personally interviewed by the same researcher in the Rochester, New York area. The kindergarten teachers were from urban, suburban and rural public school systems.
    • Veterans Among Us 2013

      Wierzbowski, Kenneth R.; Cowling, Charlie; The College at Brockport (2013-01-01)
      This slideshow features veterans connected to The College at Brockport from the Civil War to the present day. Updated for 2013.
    • Veterans Among Us 2014

      Wierzbowski, Kenneth R.; Cowling, Charlie; The College at Brockport (2014-01-01)
      This slideshow features veterans connected to The College at Brockport from the Civil War to the present day. Updated for 2014.
    • Veterans Among Us 2016

      Wierzbowski, Kenneth R.; Cowling, Charlie; The College at Brockport (2016-01-01)
      This slideshow features veterans connected to The College at Brockport from the Civil War to the present day. Updated for 2016.
    • Victor Hugo's "Cromwell"

      Coulet du Gard, Rene (2014-10-24)
    • Video Games and the Classroom: A Learning Connection

      Cimbricz, Sandra; St. James, Erin; The College at Brockport (2014-05-10)
      Today, many adolescents invest significant amounts of time and energy playing video games, even when games are difficult, tedious, and complex. This phenomenon has led educators to wonder: What import if any do video games hold for learning and instructional design in classrooms, grade 9-12? Two scholarly works in particular explore this topic, including What Video Games Have to Teach us About Learning and Literacy (Gee, 2007) and “Cracking the Code of Electronic Games: Some Lessons for Educators” (Alexander et al., 2010). This paper explores the learning principles behind games as noted by these two scholarly works and how these principles can be used in the secondary English classroom to foster motivation, engagement, and successful learning among adolescents.
    • Video Games In Education

      Heins, Matthew C.; SUNY College at Brockport (2017-12-01)
      The purpose of this paper is to review relevant literature that explored the impact of video games within the field of education. Through a review of studies on video games in education, between 2000 and 2015, I aim to discuss that video games do have educational value in multiple content areas k-12, and educators have effectively implemented video games consistently through the same approaches. In addition, I discuss that there are existing limitations within schools due to educators and a lack of adequate technology available to support the implementation of video games into education. My analysis of the current literature confirms Alexander et. al. (2010) claim that video games can be utilized in every content area, while refuting Alexander et. al. (2010) claim for the best approach for video game implementation into the classroom currently, as well as that I believe educators and a lack of technology are responsible for the very minimal implementation of video games into education. With this in mind, it is my hope that, with this knowledge, the education system can implement video games better to meet student needs and improve educational practice. Finally, I make recommendations for the future of student learning and instruction, as well as ideas for future research.
    • Views of African American Males on their Educational Experiences

      Abdulmateen, G. Najmah; The College at Brockport (1995-05-01)
      This study examined the opinions of African American males on the American educational system through an analysis of their expressions about their educational experiences. The researcher interviewed 40 African American Males in the following categories: second, fourth, sixth, eighth, tenth and twelfth grades, high school graduates and high school dropouts. There were five subjects interviewed for each category. A set of eight questions was used to ascertain the opinions of these young men. The researcher compiled a listing of the raw data as well as charts that quantify the interview results. The findings indicate that school districts should examine their hiring practices as well as adjust other policies and practices if they are to meet the needs of African American males.
    • Views of African-American Males on their Educational Experiences

      Baker, Patricia E.; Abdulmateen, G. Najmah (1995-05-01)
      This study examined the opinions of African American males on the American educational system through an analysis of their expressions about their educational experiences. The researcher interviewed 40 African American Males in the following categories: second, fourth, sixth, eighth, tenth and twelfth grades, high school graduates and high school dropouts. There were five subjects interviewed for each category. A set of eight questions was used to ascertain the opinions of these young men. The researcher compiled a listing of the raw data as well as charts that quantify the interview results. The findings indicate that school districts should examine their hiring practices as well as adjust other policies and practices if they are to meet the needs of African American males.
    • Violence and Social Unrest: Implications of the Reconstruction Amendments for African Americans in the Post Civil War South, 1863-1877

      Cross, Alana Brooke; The College at Brockport (2011-05-15)
      Freedom, citizenship, and manhood suffrage became rights promised by the 13th, 14th and 15th Amendments to the United States Constitution. These rights became part of the social, political, and economic fabric of America after a long and bloody Civil War. Though Democrats and Republicans differed dramatically on their principles of equality for African Americans, these rights became part of the Constitution and propelled a nation and its citizens into a protracted and racialized civil war that lasted into the l 960's. The Reconstruction Amendments granted former enslaved persons rights and privileges that were previously reserved for whites only. However, rights on paper were far different from the realities faced by many African Americans and their white Republican allies. White southern Democrats challenged these amendments, and eventually nullified them in practice, with the objective of repressing and re-enslaving African Americans inside the post Civil War South. Violence, Black Codes, and economic as well as political oppression inflicted through literacy tests and poll taxes ushered in a new era of American slavery by 1877. Between 1865 and 1877, African Americans who had fought for freedom from chattel slavery and had won emancipation were being targeted because of the laws guaranteed by the Constitution. The Reconstruction Amendments along with the Civil Rights Act of 1866 and 1875 challenged the racial hierarchy of the South and white supremacy. Due in large part to white fears and attitudes, the implications of the Reconstruction Amendments had lasting effects on both Northern and Southern Black communities that carried over and into the 20th century. The violence and social unrest of Reconstruction were an extension of the Civil War and its consequences had a direct and profound impact on the Civil Rights era which came to fruition almost one hundred years later. This thesis will argue that the Reconstruction Amendments while promising rights and equality on paper did little to help African Americans facing violence, discrimination, and segregation in the post Civil War South. The 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments made the volatile situation in the South worse for African Americans because the Federal government established no groundwork and provided little meaningful enforcement of the vague principles it guaranteed in the Constitution. These guarantees had no practical application and only served to inspire violence and facilitate white racism. What was needed were reforms and enforcement, on both federal and state levels, which promoted economic independence. While it is important to remember the positive potential of rights granted during Reconstruction by the Federal government and the Constitution, these laws propelled white supremacists into violent and malicious actions that had far reaching and devastating consequences for not only African Americans but the country as a whole.
    • Violence and the Family in the African-American Antislavery Novel

      Linderman, Kerry L.; The College at Brockport (2002-08-14)
      This thesis provides a detailed analysis of three early African-American literary works: Clotel, by William Wells Brown, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, by Harriet Jacobs, and The Garies and Their Friends, by Frank J. Webb. Specifically, these works are discussed in terms of their representations of violence, especially that stemming from slavery, and the effect of such violence on the family. An important factor in the devastation caused by the violence of slavery is that system's disruption of the domestic ideal in the homes involved. No matter how well each family may approximate idealized white domesticity of the nineteenth century, the shadow of slavery looms over each home, regardless of the racial identity of its members. This thesis discusses the ways in which violence disrupts the homes in each of the works, from forced separation of family members to invasion of the home itself. In several cases, it is apparent that the limited choices offered to the characters because of their race or gender often contribute to their domestic failures as well. Furthermore, such vulnerability to violence is not unique to the homes of black characters; although white homes are rarely subjected to the same type of violence as black homes, white characters are, nonetheless, victimized by the slave system as well. Even when slavery is not the main concern or abolition a central purpose, its inherent violence is far-reaching and inescapable, even for the most successful of white families. Though they differ somewhat in format and purpose, these three works have in common a concern not only for the effects of slavery on the individual, but also for its violent disruption of the home and family, regardless of race or class.
    • Violence in Deaf Culture: My Story, My Voice

      Watson, Cherrie; The College at Brockport (2014-08-20)
      I am a survivor of domestic violence. I also am Deaf. Domestic violence is an aggressive behavior within the home, typically involving the violent abuse of a spouse or partner. It can come in many forms: physical, mental, verbal, and emotional abuse. Most commonly, domestic violence is targeted against women. I am sharing my story as a survivor because of my time in Vera House, which is a shelter for battered women. My time at Vera House fired my passion to correlate my personal experience and informative research to raise awareness by educating others about the unique needs of Deaf domestic violence survivors. I hope that my story will awaken the hearing community to the fact that Deaf victims need allies on their side to make a change for Deaf domestic violence survivors.
    • Virtual Rube Goldberg Device

      Chi, Ed; The College at Brockport (2005-04-01)
      Use Interactive Physics to build Rube Goldberg devices, ie complicated devices to do mundane jobs.
    • Virtual time-to-contact of postural stability boundaries as a function of support surface compliance

      Haibach, Pamela; Slobounov, Semyon M.; Slobounov, Elena S.; Newell, Karl M.; Department of Kinesiology, College of Health and Human Development, The Pennsylvania State University (2006-10-10)
      This study investigated the hypothesis that virtual time-to-contact, which specifies the time to reach the functional stability boundary, is a variable controlled in the maintenance of upright posture. Three different levels of support surface compliance were used on a force platform (no foam, 5 cm of foam, and 15 cm of foam). The participant’s task was to stand still under each surface support condition both with and without vision. The stability boundary was determined for each set of conditions where the participant was required to lean as far as possible in all directions of the horizontal plane without losing stability. The results showed that the no vision conditions had a significantly larger center of pressure displacement than the vision conditions. No vision and increasing support surface compliance also increased the velocity of the center of pressure trajectory. The distribution of the radial displacement of the center of pressure showed relatively equal frequency over spatial location with no central tendency. The virtual time-to-contact with the stability boundary decreased as platform surface support became more compliant. Furthermore, the distribution of virtual time over the effective scaling range was a power law with a larger exponent in the more unstable no vision and increasing surface foam conditions. The findings provide additional evidence for the hypothesis that virtual time-to-contact with stability boundaries is a postural control variable that is regulated rather than the preservation of minimal motion around the center of the stability region as proposed in pendulum models of posture.
    • Virtue and Flourishing in Our Interpersonal Relationships

      Besser-Jones, Lorraine; Middlebury College (2011-01-01)
      The eudaimonistic thesis claims that being virtuous is a necessary aspect of the development of some important kind of happiness. To be true, it must be the case that virtue is associated with a kind of happiness that is clearly recognizable as something that we want, that we can appreciate as a good state for us to be in, that we can identify as a state of our own well-being. So here is the empirical question: in our ordinary experiences, is it the case that virtue is necessary to developing this kind of state? This is a very large, and very important, question. In this paper, I chip away at one piece of this question by exploring virtue’s role in mediating our relationships with others. Caring about others and treating them well is clearly part of being virtuous (no matter how we construe the virtues) and I think it is also one aspect of being virtuous that we can see to be an important part of our happiness—at least, in our non-skeptical moments.
    • Virtue Ethics

      Baier, Kurt; University of Pittsburgh (1982-01-01)