• Notes from an Un-hyphenated American

      Flores-Salvaggio, Cacilda; The College at Brockport (2004-12-18)
      The introduction to this thesis project discusses the idea of poetic prose as a literary device to draw in the reader and create a sense of closeness within creative non-fiction, memoir specifically. Several noted memoirists’ work is also discussed under a close reading lens examining their particular style of creating non-fiction prose. The use of punctuation to control pace in writing and the idea of the hyphen as a means to mirror the author’s “hyphenated” identity is maintained throughout the creative chapters that follow. The project concludes with several chapters composing the author’s original memoir which explores the idea and reality of the immigration experience in this “coming-to-America” tale.
    • Notes on Names in Ian Fleming's "Doctor No"

      Burelbach, Frederick M. (2014-10-28)
    • November Photo Quiz 360, Which Animal Bite Could Cause This Patient's Fever and Shortness of Breath?

      Huth, Paula A.; Laguio-Vila, Maryrose; Bedard, Brenden A.; The College at Brockport (2014-11-01)
    • Nowhere

      McKnight, Tamaron; School of the Arts (2018-01-01)
    • Nuclear Encoded Proteins Important in Mitochondrial Genome Stability

      Sia, Rey; Krembs, Luke; The College at Brockport (2012-05-04)
      The mitochondrion is widely known to be the site of cellular respiration and the factory of cellular energy. Similar to the nucleus, mitochondria house genetic material (mtDNA), which is responsible for the production of proteins essential to mechanisms required for cellular respiration. Furthermore, if there is a mutation or deletion in the mtDNA there can be ramifications in terms of energy production, which will hinder cell viability. Additionally, mutations in the mtDNA are associated with certain neuromuscular diseases as well as contributing to the aging process. The focus of this research is to identify genes that contribute to the maintenance of the mtDNA. Our data from genetic assays indicate that loss of the Clu1p protein exhibits an increase respiration loss as well as increase spontaneous point mutations. In addition, loss of Clu1p alters mitochondrial morphology.
    • Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Evidence of Disorder and Motion in Yttrium Trideuteride

      Balbach, John L.; Conradi, Mark S.; Hoffmann, Markus M.; Udovic, Terrence J.; Adolphi, Natalie L.; Knox College; National Institutes of Health; NIST Center for Neutron Research; The College at Brockport; Washington University in St Louis (1998-12-01)
      Three samples of YDx, with x ranging from 2.9 to nearly 3.0, were studied with deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance to gain insight into the locations of the D atoms in the lattice and their motions. Line shapes at low temperatures (200–330 K) show substantial disorder at some of the deuterium sites. Near 355 K, the spectrum sharpens to yield three uniaxial Pake patterns, reflecting a motional averaging process. However, the three measured intensities do not match the ratios expected from the neutron-determined, HoD3-like structure. This is strong evidence that the structure and space group of YD3 are different than reported, or that the current model needs adjustment. At still higher temperatures near 400 K, the Pake doublet features broaden, and a single sharp resonance develops, signalling a diffusive motion that carries all D atoms over all sites. The temperature at which line shape changes occur depends on the number of deuterium vacancies, 3-x. The changes occur at lower temperatures in the most defective sample, indicating the role of D-atom vacancies in the motional processes. The longitudinal relaxation rate T1-1 displays two regimes, being nearly temperature independent below 300 K and strongly thermally activated above. The relaxation rate depends on the number of deuterium vacancies, 3-x, varying an order of magnitude over the range of stoichiometries studied and suggesting that D-atom diffusion is involved. Also, the activation energy describing T1-1?(kB×5500?K) approximately matches that for diffusion. An unusual ?0-0.7 frequency dependence of T1-1 is observed. A relaxation mechanism is proposed in which diffusion is the rate-determining step and in which frequency dependence arises from a field-dependent radius of the relaxation zones.
    • Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Probe for Supercritical Water and Aqueous Solutions

      Hoffmann, Markus M.; Conradi, Mark S.; The College at Brockport; Washington University in St Louis (1997-01-01)
      A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe for high pressure, high temperature studies is presented. While applicable to many physical systems, the device is optimized for the study of the physics and chemistry of supercritical water and its solutions. The design is modular and is particularly simple, using readily available parts and materials. A new approach is presented for elimination of the magnetic field from the heater currents. The probe has been used to 600?°C and 400 bar. The rf performance is quite good; the NMR linewidth is about 0.1 ppm full width at half-height at any pressure and temperature.
    • Number and Numberation Lesson Using TI Calculator

      Fox, Helen; The College at Brockport (2004-10-29)
      Students will be able to convert fractions, decimals, and percents using the TI-84 to solve applications. The TI-84 will provide the student with an easier, faster way to solve applications involving converting fractions, decimals, and percents AND serve as a strategy to check work.
    • Nurse Burnout and Implementation of Stress Relieving Techniques

      Barbel, Paula; Tomasello, Sarah R.; The College at Brockport (2019-05-16)
      Nurse burnout can be defined as the emotional, physical and mental strain that the profession of nursing has on the nurse; leading to dissatisfaction with their job and their ability to practice (“Nurse Burnout”, 2019). Unfortunately, nurse burnout is prevalent throughout healthcare institutions. Burned out nurses are more prone to making medication and other patient related errors. Thus, an increase in the amount of nurses experiencing burnout can be a strong indicator of the decrease in the number of safe and effective nurses there are practicing at any given time within an institution. (Isa, et al., 219). Burnout can affect nurses of all backgrounds and specialties. There are lots of factors that contribute to the burnout that many nurses experience. Some of these things include the personal, emotional and social aspects of their lives and; not to mention the inherent duties that come with the profession.
    • Nutrient and sediment loss from a Niagara County watershed : the east branch of Twelvemile Creek, May 1998 to May 2000

      Makarewicz, Joseph C.; Lewis, Theodore W.; The College at Brockport (2000-07-01)
      Discharge and nutrient loss from a Niagara County tributary, Twelvemile Creek, was intensely monitored for two consecutive years by automated gauging and sampling techniques. This report focuses on the two annual cycles monitored (19 May 1998 to 18 May 1999 [Year 1] and 19 May 1999 to 17 May 2000 [Year 2]). The sampling regime allows an accurate measurement of discharge, nutrient and soil loss from a watershed during hydrometeorological events and nonevent conditions. Discharge and concentrations of nitrate, total phosphorus, sodium, total suspended solids, and total kjeldahl nitrogen were measured and converted into the amount of material lost from the watershed or loading to Lake Ontario.
    • Nutrient and Sediment Loss from Oneida Lake Tributaries : The South Shore Tributaries

      Makarewicz, Joseph C.; Lewis, Theodore W.; The College at Brockport (2000-12-01)
      In recognition of the need to acquire a uniform, organized approach to addressing surface water degradation and given the diverse nature of non-point sources of pollution, the Central New York Regional Planning and Development Board organized the Oneida Lake and Watershed Task Force. The Task Force is an alliance of agencies, organizations, elected officials, and citizens interested in the protection of water resources in the Oneida Lake Watershed. Because of the increased population and development pressure and because of water quality concerns south of Oneida Lake, monitoring of southern tributaries of Oneida Lake was initiated first. The intent is to expand this effort into the entire Oneida Lake watershed. Determination of sources and magnitude of soil and nutrient losses from a watershed is prerequisite to remedial action and essential to making cost-effective land management decisions as it reduces the likelihood of costly miscalculations based on the assumption of soil and nutrient sources and modeling rather than their actual identification. The goal of this report is to provide: An interpretive summary of chemistry trends for each subwatershed in the southern Oneida Lake watershed; A prioritization of the southern region tributaries, based on nutrient and soil loss; and A comparison between nutrient and soil loss from Oneida Lake subwatersheds to other central New York watersheds with different land use practices.
    • Nutrient and Sediment Loss from the Watersheds of Canandaigua Lake

      Makarewicz, Joseph C.; Lewis, Theodore W.; The College at Brockport (2000-04-01)
      In the past three years of tributary monitoring, we have established the importance of meteorological events to the loss of nutrients and material into Canandaigua Lake. We have also prioritized the sub-watershed in terms of those losses and narrowed the focus of remedial attention down from sixteen to six sub-watersheds. This has allowed a shift in a portion of the monitoring towards the identification of the actual sources, both point and non-point, of pollution in the priority watersheds. The Sucker Brook Segment Analysis has been completed (Makarewicz, Lewis and Lewandowski 1999). Intensive monitoring is also continuing in the watershed. At present, efforts are concentrated on segment analysis of Gage Gully and Deep Run.
    • Nutrient and Sediment Loss from the Watersheds of Orleans County Year 2: Johnson, Oak Orchard and Sandy Creek Watersheds. June 1998 - May 1999

      Makarewicz, Joseph C.; Lewis, Theodore W.; The College at Brockport (1999-12-01)
      In recognition of the need to acquire a uniform, organized approach to addressing surface water degradation and given the diverse nature of non-point sources of pollution, the Soil and Water Conservation District has recently formed a committee whose specific task is to address water quality issues. Since the reduction of non-point source pollution is likely to occur through the implementation of Best Management Practices (BMP's) and changes in land use regulations, this committee provides the necessary foundation for these changes to occur. This committee has become known as the Orleans County Water Quality Coordinating Committee (WQCC). With the combined expertise of the Water Quality Coordinating Committee and the availability of actual field data, progress towards healthier freshwater resources is underway. A recommendation of the WQCC was to move forward in prioritizing the major tributaries in terms of high nutrient losses from the watershed. The objectives of Orleans County's program include: 1. Determination of the status of Orleans County's primary surface waters and observe changes over time; 2. Documentation of what types and amounts of nutrients may be adversely impacting water quality and the conditions which generate them; 3. Determination of what urban, rural, industrial and agricultural practices within a watershed may be impacting water quality; 4. Development of a technical database for informed water quality management decisions; and, 5. Assessment of the feasibility and effectiveness of potential control measures likely to be used to reduce non-point and point sources of pollution. Determination of sources and magnitude of soil and nutrient losses from a watershed is prerequisite to remedial action and essential to making cost-effective land management decisions as it reduces the likelihood of costly miscalculations based on the assumption of soil and nutrient sources and modeling rather than their actual identification. We have found that this process enhances the ability of concerned groups to obtain external funding for demonstration and remedial projects.
    • Nutrient and Sediment Loss from the Watersheds of Orleans County: Johnson, Oak Orchard and Sandy Creek Watersheds. June 1997- June 1998

      Makarewicz, Joseph C.; Lewis, Theodore W.; The College at Brockport (1998-10-01)
      Three Orleans County tributaries were intensely monitored for one year (5 June 1997 to 4 June 1998) with automated gaging and samnpling stations installed on Oak Orchard, Johnson and Sandy Creeks. This sampling regime allows an accurate measurement of discharge, nutrient and sediment loss from the watersheds during both event and nonevent conditions. Discharge and concentrations of nitrate, total phosphorus, sodium, total suspended solids, and total kjeldahl nitrogen were measured and converted into the amount of material lost from each watershed.
    • Nutrient and Soil Losses from the Eighteenmile Creek Watershed

      Makarewicz, Joseph C.; Lewis, Theodore W.; White, Daniel J.; Seider, Mark; Digiacomo, Victor; Niagara County Soil and Water Conservation District; The College at Brockport (2006-08-01)
      Determination of sources and magnitude of soil and nutrient losses from a watershed is prerequisite to remedial action and essential to making cost-effective land management decisions as it reduces the likelihood of costly miscalculations based on the assumption of soil and nutrient sources and modeling rather than their actual identification. This process enhances the ability of concerned groups to obtain external funding for demonstration and remedial projects. In July 2003, the Niagara County Soil & Water Conservation District (NCSWCD), in conjunction with the Department of Environmental Sciences and Biology at SUNY Brockport, began a monitoring program for Eighteenmile Creek, located in Niagara County, New York. The purpose of the monitoring program was to collect water quality data to quantify the concentration and loading of nutrients and suspended sediments transported from Eighteenmile Creek to Lake Ontario and to evaluate the health of the creek and its impact on Lake Ontario. In addition, the data serve as a database to make informed water quality management decisions including the development of a watershed management plan, and as a benchmark of discharge and nutrient data to measure the success of future remediation efforts. This report, prepared by SUNY Brockport and the Niagara County Soil and Water Conservation District, provides information on the nutrient/sediment monitoring program of Eighteenmile Creek. Included are methodologies, results of the monitoring including documentation on types and amounts of nutrients that may be adversely impacting water quality and the conditions which generate them. Lastly, the report serves as a mechanism of transmittal of results and conclusions to all concerned parties and stakeholders of the Eighteenmile Creek watershed.
    • Nutrient Loading and Segment Analysis of Streams Entering Lake Neatahwanta: with an Evaluation of the Muckland Demonstration Project in Oswego County

      Makarewicz, Joseph C.; Lewis, Theodore W.; The College at Brockport (1999-02-01)
      Here we report on the status of Lake Neatahwanta and losses of materials and nutrients from the various watersheds draining into the lake based on work done over the past five years. The conclusion that Sheldon Creek and its watershed are the dominant source of sediments and nutrients to Lake Neatahwanta is inescapable. Based on this conclusion, an effort know as segment analysis has begun in the Sheldon Creek watershed to systematically analyze the watershed for sources of nutrient and soil loss. Preliminary results of the segment analysis currently underway are presented. Finally, we provide results from the muckland demonstration study. This study demonstrates the ability of a constructed wetland to remove nutrients from drainage water from a muckland in agriculture.
    • Nutrient Loading of Streams Entering Lake Neatahwanta Oswego County, NY: A Summary of the Lake Neatahwanta Tributary Monitoring

      Makarewicz, Joseph C.; Lewis, Theodore W.; The College at Brockport (1994-06-01)
      This study suggests that the highly eutrophic condition of Lake Neatahwanta is in large part due to the very high loadings of nutrients from the surrounding watershed. Specifically, Sheldon Creek was identified as a major contributor of phosphorus and total suspended solids to the lake. The amount of nutrients entering the lake from Sheldon Creek were in excess of those observed in creeks of New York receiving point source loadings from small sewage treatment plants. Improvement of the water quality of Lake Neatahwanta will depend upon the identification and remediation of the major sources of nutrients in the watershed and in the Sheldon Creek watershed in particular.
    • Nutrient Loading of Streams Entering Sodus Bay and Port Bay, NY

      Makarewicz, Joseph C.; Lewis, Theodore W.; Williams, Robert K.; The College at Brockport; Wayne County Soil and Water Conservation District (1994-10-01)
      The Wayne County SWCD, in cooperation with the Center for Applied Aquatic Sciences and Aquaculture at SUNY Brockport, have successfully identified and prioritized several problems associated with water pollution on two watersheds. The initial goal was to identify any pollution problems that may have existed. The first objective was to identify and prioritize which nutrients were of concern. The second objective was to identify and prioritize which tributaries and their watersheds were the most impaired. All of these objectives have been achieved. Our current goal is to identify the sources of priority pollutants within the priority 2 tributaries and to implement corrective measures. Our final objective will be to develop a comprehensive pollution prevention plan. Each of these goals represents a common sense approach to improving water quality. By first identifying and prioritizing tributaries, pollutants and sources, the District is able to make decisions that will have the greatest impact on water quality and thus provide a high level of cost effectiveness. Previous monitoring work in Wayne County has allowed for the successful identification and prioritization of nutrients likely to be promoting eutrophication on local embayments, Monitoring strategies have also allowed for the identification and prioritization of the most polluted tributaries on Sodus and Port Bay. These accomplishments have provided a foundation for the next and current phase of the program; identifying the actual sources of pollution. Since Sodus Creek East and Wolcott Creek have been identified as the most impaired, it follows that correcting pollution problems on these tributaries shall result in the greatest improvement on water quality downstream. The method currently being used to identify sources of polluted runoff is referred to as Stressed Stream Analysis or segment analysis. This method involves the sectioning of a stream into segments and collecting water samples at noted locations along each segment. As multiple samples are collected, analyzed and reviewed, new sample sites are determined in such a way that allows for the isolation of significant nutrient inputs. These inputs can be field specific or in the case of point sources can be structure specific whether point or nonpoint. Major tributaries continue to be monitored. This will serve as a benchmark that can be used to assess future improvements implemented in the watersheds. Stressed Stream Analysis has not been fully completed on Glemnark and Wolcott Creeks. This report reflects the accomplishments to date utilizing Stressed Stream Analysis and the results of tributary monitoring. 3
    • Nutrient Loading of Streams Entering Sodus Bay and Port Bay, NY 1 April, 1990 To 30 June, 1991

      Makarewicz, Joseph C.; Lewis, Theodore W.; Williams, Robert K.; The College at Brockport; Wayne County Soil and Water Conservation District (1991-09-01)
      Freshwater resources have historically played a key role in community development and sustainability. Maintaining a high quality freshwater resource is of equal importance. Within the Finger Lakes Region of New York State, degradation of water quality and aesthetics due to excessive plant growth is a growing concern. Involved agencies have recently focused their attention on non-point source pollution as a primary candidate linked to accelerated macrophyte growth and surface water degradation. Wayne County recognizes the importance of maintaining a quality water resource and has responded by developing a Water Quality Program. Established in 1 987 and administered jointly between the Wayne County Soil and Water Conservation District and the Wayne County Planning Department, the program has received financial support made possible through the Finger Lakes Aquatic Vegetation Control Program (AVCP). The AVC program was created through a mutual effort between the New York State Legislature, the "Department of Environmental Conservation and the Finger Lakes Water Resources Board. The overall goal of Wayne County's water quality program is to develop a long-term water quality /lake management plan designed to control non-point source pollution on Sodus and Port Bays. Once implemented, this plan will serve to protect the integrity of these resources. A major improvement in our assessment capability occurred with the construction of a continuous stage height recorder on Sodus Creek. The addition of the continuous stream height recorder fine tunes our ability to evaluate nutrient and sediment loading into Sodus Bay during hydrologic events. In addition ,initiation of weekly sampling of Wolcott Creek on Port Bay has expanded this program to another body of water in Wayne County. The objectives of Wayne County's program include: 1 ) To determine the status of Wayne County's primary surface waters and observe changes over time; 2) To document what types and amounts of nutrients may be adversely impacting water quality and the conditions which generate them; 3) To develop a technical database for informed water quality management decisions; and 4) To assess the feasibility and effectiveness of potential control measures likely to be used to reduce non-point sources.
    • Nutrient Loadings Into Conesus Lake

      Teall, Gregory L.; The College at Brockport (1989-01-01)
      A nutrient loading study utilizing field measurements has not been performed on Conesus Lake tributaries since the construction of a perimeter sewer. The database from this study includes many parameters and is quite large. This report details the results of measurements for stream nutrient loadings, effects of the Inlet wetland on nutrient dynamics and road salt loadings. N0 3 -N loading upstream of the Conesus Inlet Wetland that was consistently about 2.5 times higher than downstream suggests nitrogen removal by denitrification in the wetland. Hanna's and Wilkins Creeks were found to be sources of high sodium and chloride loadings on an areal basis (kgjha). A statistically significant multiple regression (r 2 = 0.51, p = 0.001) was found which describes decreasing temperature, increasing precipitation and increased sodium loadings during the winter months, November to March. Soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) and nitrate-nitrite nitrogen (N03 -N) loadings of 2,444 kg and 47,870 kg, respectively, were estimated for eight tributaries to Conesus Lake for the period April 1985 March 1986. Intense precipitation in November 1985 and the March 1986 snowmelt resulted in these two months combining for 72% of the total SRP load and 65% of the total N0 3 -N load. Two streams located in the northwest quadrant of the watershed, (Long Point Gully and Hanna's Creek) were identified as major sources of nutrient 1 oads, combining for 41% of the total SRP load and 40% of the total N0 3 -N load. Collectively, the northern streams exported about twice as much N0 3 -N ·and SRP than the southern streams. This suggests that remedial efforts for decreasing nutrient loss from the Conesus Lake watershed should be aimed toward the northern streams in general, and Hanna's and Long Point in particular. A strong, direct relationship between stream nutrient load and the percent of the watershed in cropland has been found. This has implications for watershed management if there is a desire to mitigate the nutrient load from the tributaries. Fertilization practices could become more conservative, crops requiring less fertilizer could be grown, and strategies to decrease direct runoff are discussed and could be implemented.