• I Am a Softer Me

      Sutherland, Mark; The College at Brockport (2015-05-01)
    • I Am Not Barbie, and I Do Not Need a Ken

      Maldonado, Annette (2017-09-07)
      Throughout history, women have faced unfairness and gender inequality. Women are stereotyped and mistreated every day. Some examples are, women are paid less than men, and women have to cover their bodies in public (if not, it is their fault if something dangerous happens to them). Home is supposed to be a safe haven for women, but what about if the unfairness happens at home by the people we love the most? Mistreatment can come from our parents. As a young woman who was treated differently than my brother, I talk about my experiences and how they have shaped my life. I strive to help others understand and be more aware of the inequalities between siblings and parents.
    • I Became a Teacher for the Money and Fame: An Examination of the Effects of Humor on Student Perceptions and Attitudes towards Mathematics

      Wade, Carol H.; Rider, Daniel P.; The College at Brockport (2014-07-01)
      Students may not find their mathematics classes interesting and could attribute this lack of interest to the subject matter. Along with this disinterest, students may display a lack of motivation and may struggle to understand the material (Ames, 1992). These students may not connect with their teacher or identify as a learner of mathematics, which could be stressful for students. However, humor can be implemented in the classroom to provide a relaxed atmosphere in which students can learn and reduce the level of stress (Girdlefanny, 2004)). Humor also allows students to better connect with their teachers, gain understanding and connection to material, and increase student interest (Huss, 2008). This thesis explores how students’ perceptions and attitudes towards mathematics class changed over time when humor was implemented in the classroom. Students completed pre and post surveys regarding mathematics and the use of humor in the classroom, with the implementation of humor occurring between the two surveys. A paired t-test was then used to compare surveys and determine that humor had a significant impact on students’ perceptions and attitudes towards mathematics. Students indicated that they felt more relaxed and comfortable participating in class, as well as better able to remember and understand the material, when humor was present in the classroom.
    • I Feel Trapped: Motivation, Engagement, and Text Choice with Struggling Readers

      Colsntonio-Yurko, Kathleen; Olsen, Brie (2017-05-13)
      The purpose of this qualitative research study is to explore the role of reading motivation, reading engagement, and text choice when working with a struggling reading in middle school.. By exploring how specific factors influence struggling readers, through this study, teachers will be able to have a better understanding as to the importance that motivation and engagement play in working with struggling readers in middle school.
    • I Prefer to be on Empty

      Chichester, Timothy; Cost, Patrick; The College at Brockport (2012-07-01)
      Since the Industrial Revolution, the world has become increasingly dependent on the use of fossil fuel as a source of energy. According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) the United States consumed seven billion barrels of petroleum in the year 2011 (EIA, 2011). This accounts for 22 percent of the total world’s consumption of petroleum per year. However, the United States only makes up five percent of the world’s population. With such high demands for oil, the United States imports almost half of its oil from other countries around the world. With the transportation of large amounts of oil comes the risk of an oil spill. Recently, models for oil spills have been created to allow for more efficient removal and prevention of the spread of oil in the event of a spill. For our purposes, modeling can be used to allow students to virtually explore the dispersion of oil in the ocean. By using a model, students are able to look at a situation, in our case an oil spill, through a controlled environment. This gives students the capability to test multiple variables one at a time, and make observations on the impact that each variable has on the spread of oil. Students would be provided with a complete model, consisting of an environment and agents. Using the provided model, students would have the freedom to test different scenarios by adding or removing agents from the worksheet. This assignment consists of a cross discipline topic between Biology and Chemistry. In Biology, this model would be used during the ecology unit, or water quality unit, and would provide students with a real life example of human impact on an ecosystem. In the chemistry classroom, this model can provide students with the opportunity to apply their knowledge of the effects of polarity on solutions. This model can also be used as a real life connection to the abstract ideas of organic chemistry. Along with using AgentSheets, and completing the worksheet, students would incorporate learning through inquiry by completing a lab report on their findings. As an extra credit assignment, students would be allowed to create their own models. This lesson plan addresses NYS Standards in Biology and Chemistry. The accompanying zipped file includes the lesson plan, powerpoint presentations, and student worksheets.
    • i-Ready, Are You?

      Robb, Susan; Federico, Alicia M.; The College at Brockport (2016-05-11)
      This study explores how my first-grade students interact with the newly implemented educational program, i-Ready. Students use this program weekly for both math and reading. Observations were made over the course of 5 weeks while students were using i-Ready. A double-entry journal was used to document data regarding the lessons students were working on, things that were said, facial expressions, and body language. Data excerpts will be used to illustrate key findings. There is very little research in the field that directly studies this program, which is what makes this study significant.
    • IB Mathematics Standard Level - Statistics Unit - Online Instruction

      Miles, Alexa (2020-05-15)
      This statistics unit is designed to be delivered 100% remotely for IB Math SL students. For our class, this was Unit 11. There are five lessons of content in this unit being, 11.1 Histograms and Boxplots, 11.2 Variance and Standard Deviation, 11.3 Probability Distributions and Expected Value, 11.4 Binomial Distribution, and 11.5 Normal Distribution. Each lesson consists of one Edpuzzle video for the students to watch and take notes on and one worksheet style practice assignment (informal assessment) for the students to complete. There is one formal assessment after lesson 2 and a larger (two-day) formal assessment after lesson 5. The assessments are typical exam style assessments. There are two days of review built in before the large end-of-unit assessment including a Quizizz game and a sheet of IB review problems. Each day should be about one hour of work time. Full delivery of this unit should take 10 hours.
    • Ice Cream Graphing Lab

      Maloney, Julia; The College at Brockport (2003-07-28)
      Guided data collection through graphing with provided example. Student survey will be conducted in the classroom, focusing on the (3) favorite flavors of ice cream, frequency of eating ice cream, soft versus hard and preference for brand of ice cream.
    • Ideal Gas Law

      Burdette, Daniel; Thompson, Todd R.; The College at Brockport (2012-07-01)
      We created models with interactive physics, agent sheets, and excel and also found a web based application which could be used cohesively in a classroom to help students visualize the principles of the ideal gas law. The interactive physics and agent sheets models that we created represent what happens to a gas when it is compressed. The excel workbook helps the student understand the math behind the ideal gas law, and helps the student understand relationships of variables in an equation. The web based application mimics a physical experiment which displays the basic concepts of the ideal gas law. This project addresses the following NYS Standards: Math: ? Quantities (N-Q) ? Seeing Structure in Expressions (A-SSE) ? Creating Equations (A-CED) ? Interpreting Functions (F-IF) ? Linear, Quadratic, & Exponential Models (F-LE) Chemistry: STANDARD 1—Analysis, Inquiry, and Design: ? Students will use mathematical analysis, scientific inquiry, and engineering design, as appropriate, to pose questions, seek answers, and develop solutions. STANDARD 6—Interconnectedness: Common Themes ? Students will understand the relationships and common themes that connect mathematics, science, and technology and apply the themes to these and other areas of learning. The primary file is a lesson plan, accompanied by supplemental files. In the supplemental zipped files, you will find: Student worksheets Lesson plan Powerpoint presentations
    • Identidad Sexual y Nación en Madre Que Estás en Los Cielos, de Pablo Simonetti

      Parada, Andrea; The College at Brockport (2006-12-01)
      RESUMEN / ABSTRACT Este trabajo estudia la novela Madre que estás en los cielos de Pablo Simonetti como una propuesta de tolerancia e inclusión de la diferencia. A través de las memorias de la protagonista, el autor establece una cadena de identidades marginadas que se inicia con la emigración forzada de la abuela italiana a Chile a fines del siglo XIX y que se prolonga en la identidad de género y la preferencia sexual. En el caso de la mujer, el texto recupera renuncias definitorias de un devenir en la periferia de una cultural patriarcal y los amagos de negociar un espacio acorde con su subjetividad. La homosexualidad se formula como normalidad paralela dentro parámetros occidentales hegemónicos de aplicabilidad distorsionante en Latinoamérica al desconocer, entre otros, factores raciales y de clase social. SEXUAL IDENTITY AND NATION IN MADRE QUE ESTÁS EN LOS CIELOS BY PABLO SIMONETTI This essay interprets Pablo Simonetti’s novel Madre que estás en los cielos as a call for tolerance and social inclusion. Through the memoirs of the female protagonist, the author establishes a chain of marginalized identities harking back to the forced emigration of the protagonist’s Italian grandmother to Chile at the end of the 19th century and continues with social exclusions based on gender roles and sexual preference. In the case of the woman, the novel calls attention on the one hand to the most significant deprivations of an existence that unfolds in the periphery of patriarchy and, on the other, to her attempts to negotiate for herself a space that embraces her feminine identity. Homosexuality is formulated as a parallel normality within hegemonic Western parameters that are misapplied in Latin America as they do not take into account racial or class differences.
    • Identification and Literacy: The Way Children Identify Themselves as Literacy Learners

      Olmstead, Kathleen; Roberts, Kristina M. (2017-05-12)
      This research takes a closer look into the implementation of explicit instruction in adopting a Growth Mindset and how it can affect students’ literacy identity. It also explores how students identify themselves as literacy learners. The purpose of this study is to learn more about how students identify themselves as literacy learners. Furthermore, this study looks into the impact of explicitly teaching reading strategies and Growth Mindset. This research also looks into finding ways for students to move away from negatively identifying themselves as readers. Data were collected for this study over a period of six weeks using the students’ reading assessments, pre-interviews, post-interviews, writing samples and field notes during Guided Reading groups, independent work and Writer’s Workshop. Data were analyzed for how the students identified as readers and how Growth Mindset impacted their literacy learning.
    • Identification of E. coli Sources in Conesus Lake Sub-watersheds Using BOX A1R- Derived Genetic Fingerprints

      Somarelli, Jason; The College at Brockport (2004-08-01)
      In the Conesus Lake watershed , best management practices (BMP's) were implemented on farms in the upper watershed and the resultant change in bacterial water quality was assessed using both quantification techniques and Rep-PCR molecular tools during events and non-events. Genetic fingerprints of Escherichia coli isolates from a library of known source isolates (n=123) were compared to E. coli of unknown origin obtained from stream water samples. The genetic library consisted of E. coli sources from cattle, humans, geese and deer. Fecal samples were collected aseptically and E. coli was isolated from each of these sources. Genetic fingerprints were obtained from each of the known sources using Rep-PCR. Fingerprints from unknown sources were compared with those in the library using computer based image analysis. These techniques were used to identify sources of E. coli in the watershed and accurately demonstrate the effectiveness of the best management practices in the watershed. Results found E. coli levels that were significantly higher than that established by EPA for recreational waters (200CFU/1OOml) on several occasions throughout the year, especially during event periods. In addition, the sources of E. coli in the watershed were identified.
    • Identification of Learning Impaired Linguistically Different Students in Rochester, New York, Suburban Schools

      Blake, Robert W.; Stone, Lucille Testa; The College at Brockport (1986-05-01)
      This paper reviews the legal basis for Bilingual Education and Special Education which have formed the framework for Bilingual Special Education. Assessment procedures and considerations utilized to screen linguistically different students in the area of language dominance/proficiency and IQ measurement are examined. The advantages and disadvantages of assessment tools such as culture free tests, translated tests, regional norms, adaptive scales, criterion reference measures and pluralistic assessment techniques are discussed. Included are the results of a questionnaire which was distributed to the directors of Special Education in thirty-two schools in and near Monroe County. The purpose of this questionnaire was to ascertain information concerning the types of assessment methods used by these educators to identify linguistically different students for learning impediments. Twenty-one schools responded to this survey which form the basis of this study. The results indicate that educators are well informed regarding the need to obtain performance data of bilingual students in both the linguistic and cognitive areas. However, it was quite evident from the multitude of tests used over the last two years that these professionals did not feel that existing tests adequately reflected true performance levels of these students.
    • Identification of Problems in Campus Recreation Programs in North America

      Stier, William F.; Schneider, Robert C.; Kampf, Stephen; Wilding, Gregory E.; Haines, Scott G.; Bowling Green State University - Main Campus; The College at Brockport; University at Buffalo (2004-01-01)
      In campus recreation programs, major problem areas within (a) technology, (b) personnel, and (c) perception and value were identified. The subjects were campus recreation directors throughout North America. The surveyed directors expressed the extent to which they agreed or disagreed with literaturebased, potential problem areas within campus recreation programs. Areas primarily agreed upon as being major problem areas within campus recreation were: the availability of quality officials (61 %), perception of program by institution (49%), and value of program as perceived by higher administration (47%). Generally, in order to improve programs, directors should place an emphasis on attaining and training quality officials and implement a public relations campaign that positively portrays their program.
    • Identify Locations of Objects Using the Cartesian Coordinate System

      Cerra, Brigitte; Cheyne, Brian; Hallows, Jennifer; Lombard, Kim; The College at Brockport (2004-10-26)
      Students use mathematical analysis, scientific inquiry, and engineering design, as appropriate, to pose questions, seek answers, and develop solutions
    • Identifying Barriers to HIV Testing Among Men who have Sex with Men

      Ferrusi, Charles; The College at Brockport (2015-01-01)
      HIV incidence rates have remained relatively stable throughout the past five years; however, among men who have sex with men (MSM), particularly young MSM, incidence has increased. According to national surveillance data, MSM accounted for 61% of HIV cases diagnosed in 2010. A low viral load reduces the risk of HIV transmission and slows the progression of HIV to AIDS. Treatment as prevention (TasP) has been identified as a major part of the solution to ending the HIV epidemic. This research focuses specifically on reasons for not taking an HIV-test among MSM. For TasP to be effective, widespread testing in order to identify HIV-positive people is needed. For the purpose of the present study, a survey was distributed at gay pride events in Rochester and Buffalo, NY during June and July 2012. Barriers to HIV testing and HIV risk were evaluated using a four-point Likert scale adapted from an instrument developed by Mikolajczak (2006). It was hypothesized that months since last HIV test would be positively correlated with barriers to testing. Months since last HIV test was positively skewed, ranging from 0 to 348 months. Therefore, Spearman rank-order correlations were used. Three items measuring barriers to testing were significantly correlated with months since last HIV test. These were perceived peer support, knowledge of HIV testing sites, and partnered relationship status. Interestingly, previous research suggested that fear of a positive result and low perceived risk were barriers to testing. These findings were not replicated in this sample. Nearly 40% of subjects had not been tested within the last year. TasP would not effectively prevent transmission among an untested group such as this. For TasP to be effective, interventions must be designed to encourage more frequent HIV testing and safer sex among those who have not been recently tested.
    • Identifying Barriers to HIV Testing Among Men who have Sex with Men

      Scheidt, Douglas M.; Ferrusi, Charles; The College at Brockport (2013-05-15)
      HIV incidence rates have remained relatively stable throughout the past five years; however, among men who have sex with men (MSM), particularly young MSM, incidence has increased. According to national surveillance data, MSM accounted for 61% of HIV cases diagnosed in 2010. A low viral load reduces the risk of HIV transmission and slows the progression of HIV to AIDS. Treatment as prevention (TasP) has been identified as a major part of the solution to ending the HIV epidemic. This research focuses specifically on reasons for not taking an HIV-test among MSM. For TasP to be effective, widespread testing in order to identify HIV-positive people is needed. For the purpose of the present study, a survey was distributed at gay pride events in Rochester and Buffalo, NY during June and July 2012. Barriers to HIV testing and HIV risk were evaluated using a four-point Likert scale adapted from an instrument developed by Mikolajczak (2006). It was hypothesized that months since last HIV test would be positively correlated with barriers to testing. Months since last HIV test was positively skewed, ranging from 0 to 348 months. Therefore, Spearman rank-order correlations were used. Three items measuring barriers to testing were significantly correlated with months since last HIV test. These were perceived peer support, knowledge of HIV testing sites, and partnered relationship status. Interestingly, previous research suggested that fear of a positive result and low perceived risk were barriers to testing. These findings were not replicated in this sample. Nearly 40% of subjects had not been tested within the last year. TasP would not effectively prevent transmission among an untested group such as this. For TasP to be effective, interventions must be designed to encourage more frequent HIV testing and safer sex among those who have not been recently tested.
    • Identifying False Intuitions in Probability and Laying a Foundation for Teaching It

      Schwind, Gregory G.; The College at Brockport (2008-08-01)
      Intuition is something we rely on in our daily lives as pure, untaught truths that guide and direct us. Simple statements like “the shortest distance between two points is a straight line” are common and self-explanatory. While this simple statement can be proved mathematically, it is instinctive to easily understand this notion and accept its entrance into one's cognitive intuition. However, there are other parts of mathematics that are not intuitive and require thought and proofs to explain their existence. The question then is: how does the mind distinguish between what is intuitive and what is in need of a solid explanation? Current research studies, on the psychological effects of incorrect intuitions on learning, state that false intuitions can cause misconceptions in every mathematics classroom. In particular, these false intuitions can be a detriment to students in the beginning stages of learning the basics of probability. The purpose of this thesis project is twofold - understand and examine current literature on the different intuitions brought by students into the classroom, and develop and present a curriculum unit plan that can avoid student’s false intuitions with regard to learning about probabilities in mathematics. The literature review section discusses the different ways people perceive the subject of probability while acknowledging its complexity. Discussion highlights different faulty approaches to learning probabilities with regard to heuristic methods – outcome, representative, and personal. Through a thorough examination of both heuristics and maxim beliefs it is noted that common misconceptions and intuitions are learned before students begin their secondary education. It is further suggested that probability and statistics be taught at the elementary level to avoid this trend. The curriculum section includes a unit plan on probability that meets the New York State Standards at the Integrated Algebra level. This incorporates a pre-assessment, daily lesson plan, daily classwork activities, daily formative assessments, and a unit test.
    • Identifying Sinkholes Using a Geographic Information System (GIS)

      Richards, Paul L.; Kita, Andrew; The College at Brockport (2018-05-09)
      Sinkholes are closed depressions in soil or bedrock that form through chemical dissolution of carbonate rock in karst regions. Several studies have identified geologic and hydrologic features that promote sinkhole formation and influence their spatial distribution. This study used a GIS to analyze the relationships between sinkholes and proximity to faults, proximity to streams, and soil thickness in Genesee County, NY. It was hypothesized that a higher frequency of sinkholes (more than half of the number of sinkholes) would occur 1,000 meters or less from a fault, 150-450 meters from a stream, and in areas with one meter or less of soil thickness. Each factor was evaluated individually using previously mapped sinkholes within the study area. A Euclidean distance function with a ten-meter resolution was used to calculate the distance from each sinkhole to the nearest fault and stream. In the study area, 38% of the sinkholes were located within 1,000 meters of a fault, and 22% of the sinkholes were located within 150-450 meters of a stream. These results do not support the hypothesis. However, 50% of the sinkholes occurred less than 450 meters from a stream. Sixty-three percent of the sinkholes occurred in areas with thin (one meter or less) carbonate soils, which supports the hypothesis. The results of this study suggest that: 1) proximity to faults and streams as well as soil thickness may be useful parameters for predicting the likelihood of sinkhole formation in karst regions, and 2) mapping these factors may be a useful strategy for identifying sinkholes remotely in a GIS.