• Caddisflies (Insecta: Trichoptera) of Fringing Wetlands of the Laurentian Great Lakes

      Armitage, Brian J.; Hudson, Patrick L.; Wilcox, Douglas A.; Midwest Biodiversity Institute, Inc.; The College at Brockport; U.S. Geological Survey (2001-09-01)
      Fringing wetlands of the Laurentian Great Lakes are subject to natural processes, such as water-level fluctuation and wave-induced erosion, and to human alterations. In order to evaluate the quality of these wetlands over space and time, biological communities are often examined. Ideally, the groups of organisms selected for these evaluations should be resident in the wetlands themselves. Fish are often sampled, but many species are not truly resident, visiting wetlands on an occasional basis to feed or on a seasonal basis to breed. Aquatic vascular plants are perhaps the most common group selected for evaluation. However, in some cases, aquatic plants give a false impression by providing photosynthetic capabilities and structural infrastructure but having greatly diminished herbivore and carnivore communities.
    • Caer Brythwch and Brythach and Nerthach in 'Culhwch and Olwen'

      Breeze, Andrew; Universidad de Navarra, Pamplona (2014-07-09)
      No abstract.
    • Caffeine and Sleep

      Sanchez, Socorro M.; Newman, Logan; The College at Brockport (2006-08-01)
      This project looked at the effects of caffeine on students.
    • Calculating Shapes

      Ezell, Stephen; The College at Brockport (2006-07-20)
      Objectives: Upon completion of this lesson, students will be able to calculate the area and perimeter of a random rectangular shape on a grid.
    • Calculating Slopes

      Iacchetta, Dave; The College at Brockport (2006-08-16)
      To teach students the importance of slope in the real world and how it is calculated and utilized in the real world (i.e. ski slopes, soap box derby locations, residential / commercial / agricultural development.
    • Call Me Madam

      du Gard, Rene Coulet; University of Delaware (2014-10-24)
    • Can American Universities be Depoliticized

      Aiken, Henry David; Brandeis University (1970-01-01)
      Every institution in society is involved in politics, and the university is no exception. So the university cannot be depoliticized. The question is how, and to what ends the university should be involved in politics. The answer is determined by the task of the university, which is to educate men and women for life in a free society. This has some specific political implications.
    • Can Attitudes Predict Outcomes? Public Opinion, Democratic Institutions and Environmental Policy

      Shum, Rob; The College at Brockport (2009-01-01)
      The ‘post-materialist’ value hypothesis, positing heightened concern for the environment, should predict eventual convergence in environmental policies. In the meantime, surprisingly wide variations persist, even when controlling for income levels. Is there a role for public opinion to explain better the divergences and outcomes observed in environmental policies? This paper explores a possible mechanism by which widely hypothesized income effects on policy can occur via pressure from public opinion. By building upon a median voter model of environmental policy-making and developing an extension to include voter information characteristics, we test these effects on air pollution outcomes of varying (global, regional and local) scales. The results provide evidence of significant effects, but suggest two antecedent conditions necessary for political and opinion variables to have an effect: redistributive opportunities, and credible frameworks for addressing collective action problems. The implication is that relying on democratic reform alone may not suffice to improve environmental performance if underlying collective action problems are not addressed.
    • Can General Education' Teachers and Inclusive Teachers Collaborate and Teach Effectively For the Services of Their Students With Disabilities?

      Rae, Shanna Delores; The College at Brockport (2004-05-15)
      This paper describes a study conducted in a suburban school district. A focus group session was established and consisted of four participants. Two participants are certified special education teachers; the other two participants are certified general education teachers. The researcher and one observer conducted the research. During the focus group session, the four educators discussed five questions amongst each other. The researcher asked the questions and wrote down the responses. The observer wrote down the responses as well to ensure accurate analysis of the responses. The research questions focused on collaboration efforts between general and special education teachers, and how collaboration is necessary in order for students with disabilities to be successful academically and socially. The purpose of this study was to provide the general feelings of general and special education teachers regarding collaboration. The results of the study found that both general and special education teachers see a need for positive collaboration. The themes that emerged throughout the focus group session was the need for planning time, the need for common goals and for all teachers to be able to choose their own model of collaboration. This study is important because it helps teachers identify some issues with collaboration and the effect that poor collaboration may have on the academic and social success of students with disabilities.
    • CAN PHYSICAL ACTIVITY BENEFIT MENTAL HEALTH? A SYNTHESIS OF LITERATURE

      Perreault, Melanie; Houston-Wilson, Cathy; McConnell, Allison (2020-08-15)
      The purpose of this synthesis is to examine the benefits of physical activity, as opposed to prescription medication, on mental health, specifically the diagnosis of depression and anxiety. Within this synthesis there is research done showing data of overprescribing and a lack of healthy treatment options from this generation’s medical professionals. The studies reviewed within the critical mass highlight many factors bringing positive data to using physical activity as a treatment for depression and anxiety in many different types of ways. Studies were reviewed through the length of intervention, type of intervention, based on participant’s symptoms and medication levels. The participants were looked at through the course of using physical activity through their knowledge/interest of activity, ideas for activity, guidance for activity etc. in the hopes that physical activity will become a lifelong treatment option for their diagnosis as opposed to prescription medication. It is the hope that future research continues to gather data to support this topic and spread awareness of it for a healthier future for both the mind and the body. Keywords: [physical activity, mental health, depression/anxiety, medication, overprescribing, symptoms, positive]
    • Can Science Disprove the Existence of God?

      van Inwagen, Peter; University of Notre Dame (2004-01-01)
      In order for science to establish that God does not exist, it would be necessary to determine which observations we would make if there were a God, and which observations we would make if there were not a God. However, these claims about what we would observe if God does or does not exist, are philosophical claims, not scientific claims. Therefore science alone could not disprove the existence of God.
    • Can the First Amendment Survive?

      Haiman, Franklyn S.; Northwestern University (1984-01-01)
    • Can you save your egg?

      Monk-George, Stephanie; Koch, Scott; The College at Brockport (2003-07-31)
      Students will design a bungee jump that allows their egg to stop within 5 centimeters of the floor when dropped from 1.5 meters. After achieving success with their design, they will model their solution using Interactive Physics and then discuss and reflect upon energy and force.
    • Canadian Wild: Poems

      Ostafew, Glenn Stryker; The College at Brockport (2008-10-05)
      It has been my hope that this thesis would serve as a bridge between three things: my past wilderness experiences, my present explorations of great nature poets, and my future as a writer. I desired to write authentic wilderness poems that gave readers new experiences, yet I was afraid that they might not be broad enough in scope and have too much sentimentality to be effective. To find a path through this dilemma I looked to great nature poets, both American and Canadian, as I sought to see how they were such successful writers. In looking at their work I asked many questions. Where did they get their inspiration? Did they use experiences or did they just write creatively? How did they talk about their past effectively? Did "place" play a large role in what they wrote about? The act of writing poetry often feels like a solitary task, as if no one has ever written like you have before, but as I searched the lives of poets I found a companionship and association that was inspiring. Looking at Margaret Atwood, for instance, gave me courage to keep alive the memories of when I was a small child in British Columbia, for she herself wrote about her own childhood experiences. John Haines was another poet who contributed to my writing process. He was not someone who simply experienced nature in his childhood. He was a man who sought it out as an adult and excluded civilization from his life. The end result of my thesis was more than I hoped for. Just by learning from great writers I was able to write boldly about my past, and I found that intertwined in my memories were people that shared those experiences with me, and they too added to the depth of my poems I call "Canadian Wild."
    • Canandaigua Lake Subwatersheds: Time Trends in Event Loading and the Watershed Index

      Makarewicz, Joseph C.; Lewis, Theodore W.; The College at Brockport (2001-02-01)
      From an applied science perspective, a goal of the Canandaigua Lake water quality monitoring program was the development of a statistically defensible database of ecologically important parameters that would allow stewards of the watershed to prioritize and determine which subwatershed had the largest potential impact on Canandaigua Lake. Before the 2000 sampling season, we had collected and analyzed a total of 5 1 samples (36 event and 15 event samples) taken from 20 tributaries of Canandaigua Lake. After three years of sampling, the database was large enough to provide a reasonable estimate of annual nutrient and sediment loss from the tributaries into Canandaigua Lake allowing the subwatersheds to be prioritized. In addition, it was generally clear that most of the nutrient and soil loss from subwatersheds occurred during hydrometeorological events. In this report, the results of the 2000 events are compared to the previous three years of events. We also introduce the concept of the Watershed Index as a method to assess future trends in event and non-event loading in each subwatershed.
    • Cancer Growth Lesson Plan

      Smith, Katie; Meyer, Mackenzie; The College at Brockport (2013-07-01)
      Students will explore a cancer simulation model utilizing a worksheet. Most students have known someone who has had cancer. This lesson is designed to introduce students to the behind the scene components and facts related to cancer. Students will understand how cancer will keep growing until treatment such as chemotherapy or radiation is used to shrink the tumor or kill the cancer. The cancer simulation game will allow students to role play and act like a natural killer cell that can kill a cancer cell. Students will be able to understand what their friend, family member, or acquaintance may have endured during a cancer diagnosis and an implemented treatment protocol. Cancer is the 2nd leading cause of death in the United States. This lesson is used to bring cancer to the forefront of class discussion. All students will benefit from this lesson because it is hands on allowing students to explore and analyze two model simulations. Students will then construct a graph using excel illustrating the total number of cancer cells present and removed. The primary file is a lesson plan, accompanied by supplemental files. In the supplemental zipped files, you will find: Student worksheets Lesson plan Powerpoint presentations
    • Cannibalistic Imprisonment: Incorporating Hunger, Food, Identity, and Language in Samuel Richardson’s Clarissa, Mary Gordon’s Final Payments, and Toni Morrison’s Beloved

      Wheeler, Holly A.; The College at Brockport (1998-01-01)
      This thesis critically examines the intersection of contemporary feminist theory and the work of three authors, Samuel Richardson, Mary Gordon, and Toni Morrison, representing classic and contemporary literature. In pursuing extended comparative readings of Richardson’s Clarissa, Gordon’s Final Payments, and Morrison’s Beloved as case studies, this project observes the various ways in which cultural and material circumstances organize relationships among writing, women's bodies, food, and identity. One facet of the argument concerns the concept of the “abject,” understood to be a “process which begins at the moment of self-realization in the pre-oedipal dyad.” This is applied to all three narratives as a means to further discuss identity with regard to each protagonist. The project juxtaposes the physical instances and metaphors of imprisonment which cause a breakdown of the heroines' language and identity, which, in turn, results in both literal and metaphorical cannibalism. Explanatory material on eating and relationship formation, as foundational to identity, is offered prior to the literary discussion that follows.
    • Cape Vincent Harbor: Summer Data Report to the Army Corps of Engineers Buffalo District

      Haynes, James M.; Makarewicz, Joseph C.; The College at Brockport (1979-08-01)
      Fish, benthos, macrophytes and birds were collected or observed over two days (16 July through 17 July 1979) at Cape Vincent Harbor, New York, to evaluate the potential biological impact of dredging on the harbor. Figure 1 is a map of the harbor area indicating the location of sampling sites. Observed fishing pressure and boat traffic were minimal during the two-day sampling trip. This is a preliminary data report. The final report will include both our analysis and interpretation of the data regarding potential impacts of dredging.
    • Capitalizing on Multiple Intelligences to Enhance Vocabulary Development in a Sixth Grade Classroom

      Begy, Gerald; Balling, Cristy L.; The College at Brockport (2000-08-01)
      This study was designed to determine if Multiple Intelligence Theory is a more effective approach to vocabulary development than direct instruction. Eighty Sixth Grade students from a suburban school district in Western New York were the subjects for this study. In order to determine the students' prior knowledge of the 60 words to be used in the study, the students were given a pretest. The study was conducted over six weeks with the students receiving a new vocabulary list consisting of ten words from the pretest each week. During three of the weeks the students were taught via direct instruction. During the remaining three weeks a multiple intelligence approach was employed. The amount of time during the school day devoted to vocabulary instruction was the same regardless of instructional approach. Specific instructional activities and lessons for each approach are outlined in the thesis. At the end of each week a posttest was given to the students. The researcher evaluated the growth made during each week and searched for a statistically significant difference between the means of the two approaches. The results forded that both methods were indeed effective in enhancing vocabulary growth in sixth grade students. However, when comparing the means of the two approaches, there was a statistically significant difference in favor of Multiple Intelligence Theory.
    • Capitalizing on Multiple Intelligences to Enhance Vocabulary Development in a Sixth Grade Classroom

      Smith, Arthur E.; Baker, Patricia E.; Balling, Cristy L.; Hummel, Breanna (2000-08-01)
      This study was designed to determine if Multiple Intelligence Theory is a more effective approach to vocabulary development than direct instruction. Eighty Sixth Grade students from a suburban school district in Western New York were the subjects for this study. In order to determine the students' prior knowledge of the 60 words to be used in the study, the students were given a pretest. The study was conducted over six weeks with the students receiving a new vocabulary list consisting of ten words from the pretest each week. During three of the weeks the students were taught via direct instruction. During the remaining three weeks a multiple intelligence approach was employed. The amount of time during the school day devoted to vocabulary instruction was the same regardless of instructional approach. Specific instructional activities and lessons for each approach are outlined in the thesis. At the end of each week a post-test was given to the students. The researcher evaluated the growth made during each week and searched for a statistically significant difference between the means of the two approaches. The results forded that both methods were indeed effective in enhancing vocabulary growth in sixth grade students. However, when comparing the means of the two approaches, there was a statistically significant difference in favor of Multiple Intelligence Theory.