• B-29 Bomber Names in the Pacific

      Lawson, Edwin D.; SUNY Fredonia (2014-10-20)
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      2014-10-24
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      2014-10-24
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      2014-10-27
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      2014-10-23
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      2014-10-24
    • Background Classical Music in a First Grade Writer's Workshop

      Koukides, Ann Marie; The College at Brockport (2009-08-01)
      Diverse disciplines claim music as inspiration and muse for great discovery and creativity. From Albert Einstein to Charles Schultz, they praise music for its ability to stir imaginative thought. The impetus for this research project was the desire for a better balanced literacy program. The study sought a greater understanding of the relationship between classical music played in the background of learning settings and successful writing and learning-focused behavior. The purpose then was to examine the impact of music on three components of a first grade writing workshop learning environment – engagement, motivation, and behavior. For the purposes of this study “classical” is defined as music composed by Bach, Beethoven, and Mozart and the like. A “Writing Workshop” is defined as designated time that includes an interdisciplinary approach which can build students’ fluency in writing through continuous, repeated exposure to the writing process. The five week study was conducted in a first grade classroom of 19 students, five days a week, in 30-35 minute workshop sessions. Data was collected by personal observation, student journal assessment, individual student interviews, and general class discussion. While there were some adverse reactions to the music and writing combination, the overall results and data collected stated the desired result – background music in a learning environment impacts and improves student attitude and academic success. Prior studies with regard to the relationship between classroom behaviors and classical music are offered as confirmation of the positive results garnered through this research project.
    • Background Music: The Effects of Lyrics and Tempo on Reading Comprehension and Speed

      Birch, Stacy; Reed, Amanda; The College at Brockport (2019-01-01)
      The purpose of this research was to assess the effects of lyrical and non-lyrical music on reading comprehension in college students, especially when tempo was taken into consideration. There were several major research questions approached. First, the current study examined a main effect of lyrics, assessing whether lyrical music hinders reading comprehension scores compared to non-lyrical music. Second, it was predicted that there would be a main effect of tempo, such that music with a fast tempo would also hinder reading comprehension scores compared to slow tempo music. Finally, it was predicted that there would be an interaction of lyrics, and tempo with passage difficulty, such that music with lyrics and a fast tempo would hinder reading comprehension the most in the presence of a difficult passage. An experiment was conducted involving 80 college students who completed a reading comprehension task, in conditions involving lyrics with slow tempo, lyrics with a fast tempo, no lyrics with a slow tempo, and no lyrics with a fast tempo, while reading passages at easy and difficult levels. The measured variables included reading comprehension and speed. Results showed that lyrical music was more detrimental to reading comprehension than non-lyrical music, and that harder passage difficulty was more detrimental than easy passage difficulty, however, music with a fast tempo was not more detrimental than music with a slow tempo. Implications of these findings suggest that language and reading comprehension processes of working memory are affected by the language component of lyrical music. These results could aid in launching more research into the study habits of young adults at the collegiate level, and help to create a more successful, healthy learning environment.
    • Backwards Skate Only: a Collection of Short Fiction

      Lotze, Sarah M.; The College at Brockport (2006-04-20)
      I've heard, over and over, during both graduate and undergraduate degrees, Flannery Connor's proclamation, paraphrased differently each time, that if you lived a full childhood, you had enough material to write for the rest of your life. I admit I was, at first, skeptical. When I heard that statement, though, I was also inspired. Part of the beauty of being human is having language to put experience in words. From this, grows my interest and practice in autobiographical fiction. My thesis, titled "Backwards Skate Only," includes five short stories that take- at least in part-from my life. Writing this way allows me to take advantage of true emotion as it is felt, whether it be the witness I bore to one brief moment in a stranger's life, as in my story "Bamboo Kitchen," or a statement that a family member made which would alter my view of them, and life, forever, as happens in my story, "Where To." It is in this vein that I am most comfortable and free as a writer. While each one of these stories borrows from my life, they do vary in the means that they borrow. Sometimes I toy with characters I know, often it is the small-town setting I have lived in most of my life. Other times true life sneaks into my fiction in the most pivotal moments I have experience. What I have learned from this project is that writing autobiographical fiction helps to evoke emotion in my writing.
    • Bacteria Growth Lesson Plan

      Butler, Nathan; Cummings, Matthew; The College at Brockport (2013-07-01)
      In this lesson’s activities, students will use scientific inquiry, computer modeling, and graphical analysis in order to extend concepts from a specific lesson example to broader general trends and themes in biology. The following criteria are from The Living Environment Core Curriculum, from the University of the State of New York and the New York State Education Department: STANDARD 1 Students will use mathematical analysis, scientific inquiry, and engineering design, as appropriate, to pose questions, seek answers, and develop solutions. STANDARD 4 Students will understand and apply scientific concepts, principles, and theories pertaining to the physical setting and living environment and recognize the historical development of ideas in science. Broad Objectives: Students will investigate the basic structure and function of bacterial DNA and how mutations affect bacterial populations. After the activities, students should be able to explain the ways mutations can be both harmful and beneficial. The expected product in this lesson objective is a computer-simulated bacterial culture and a graph of the population growth curves. The condition for demonstrating success at this task is activity in student-pairs and small groups. The criterion for success is an example of adaptations in other organisms and an explanation of how the environment determines the efficacy and value of the adaptation. Students are expected to extend and apply the concepts of mutation and adaptation to all organisms in general. Learning Outcomes/Specific Objectives: Students will be able to draw the basic structure of DNA, use computer modeling to show how mutation can result in both adaptation and maladaptation, and graph the population growth curves of simulated bacterial populations. Students will submit a 1 page written summary of the lesson and activities, including the drawing of DNA and the growth curve graph, in order to demonstrate their proficiency. Set Induction and Content: Bacterial population growth. Activities: For these activities, each student will pair with another, review the text section on bacterial genetics, and apply their knowledge to this and later activities. First, students will discuss the textbook section and then answer the following questions. Each student-pair will then join another pair for the simulation activity. Literacy Strategy: This proposed lesson utilizes computer modeling and small group discussion. Closure, Evaluation, and Assignment: After having engaged in classroom activities, students will provide examples of adaptations in other organisms in their write up. In the class discussion, students will talk about why mutations are important in the fields and subfields of biology, especially medicine. The class will discuss how the principles and processes represented in the simulation are explored through laboratory activities, including real-time bacterial culture plate incubation. For the next lesson on bacterial genetics, students can use the textbook chapters and biology websites to investigate the topic of antibiotic resistance and how genetic recombination produces new bacterial strains. The primary file is a lesson plan, accompanied by supplemental files. In the supplemental zipped files, you will find: Student worksheets Lesson plan Powerpoint presentations