• Activity at Home for Children and Youth who are Deafblind

      Lieberman, Lauren J.; Pecorella, Michael; Perkins School for the Blind; The College at Brockport (2006-10-01)
      This article suggests healthy, productive and rewarding physical activities that can take place in the home for children who are deafblind. These activities are intended for children who range in age from pre-school to high school and who are deafblind with additional disabilities.
    • Adapting Games, Sports and Recreation for Children and Adults who are Deaf-Blind

      Lieberman, Lauren J.; The College at Brockport (1996-05-01)
      With the loss of sight and hearing, an individual’s sensory input and experiences are reduced and overall development may be delayed. As a result, limits or predetermined expectations are sometimes placed on individuals who are deaf-blind by parents, professionals, agencies, and people who are deaf-blind themselves. This is equally true regarding recreational activities. Creative adaptations can alter recreation activities and programs so they will meet unique needs and provide fun and healthy exercise for all who participate. The purpose of this article is to encourage parents, teachers, professionals, therapists, and consumers, to set up and adapt recreational activities and programs to meet the needs of all children and adults.
    • Jeopardy Powerpoint Game

      Koch, Scott; The College at Brockport (2004-12-19)
      This is a project that I modified to fit my needs. It can be easily modified, and is a good way to squeeze in some differentiated instruction. Have fun!
    • Recreational Activities for Children and Youth who are Deafblind

      Lieberman, Lauren J.; The College at Brockport (2007-04-01)
      This article provides a few examples of recreational activities, games, and sports that can be adapted for children who are deafblind. There are a wide variety of additional games that, with modification, can be fun and engaging for children who are deafblind. Each child has the right to be self-determined and experience a variety of recreational activities. It is worth the time and energy spent to modify the activities to meet the needs of each unique child.
    • Using Math Games to Improve Spatial Sense and Algebraic Reasoning

      Umber, Robin E.; Baker, Patricia E.; Lach, Tisa M. (2001-07-01)
      Using games in the classroom to facilitate learning has been common practice among teachers for many years. Games tend to offer students many opportunities to participate in learning and to receive immediate feedback on their ideas, thus increasing their attentiveness and interest level. For teachers, games facilitate individualization of assessment and instruction. This study tests whether the use of math-related games alongside formal instruction improves students’ ability to solve problems involving algebraic reasoning and spatial sense. Two fifth grade classes completed a pretest similar to the Stanford Achievement Test (SAT). One of the classes then played math-related games for up to 160 minutes per week alongside their regular instruction while the other class engaged in standard instruction. A posttest was then conducted after twelve weeks to monitor change. The author found that while pretest scores were broadly similar, the difference between pretest and posttest scores was highly significant only for the experimental group. Therefore, math-based games do improve students’ ability to solve problems involving algebraic reasoning and spatial sense.