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Recent Submissions

  • 2023-2024 Joshi. Socially Motivated Belief and Its Epistemic Discontents

    Joshi, Hrishikesh (SUNY Brockport, Philosophic Eschange, 2024)
    What might an ideal epistemic agent look like? The picture given to us by philosophers over time suggests something like an autonomous thinker who appropriately responds to her evidence wherever it may point. She would believe those things for which there are the best (epistemic) reasons and wouldn’t simply believe on the basis of what is comfortable or what is popular. Thus, Descartes sought to rebuild his belief system from the foundations of only those beliefs of which he could be rationally certain. Socrates challenged the widely held philosophical and theological assumptions of his time, for which he was put to death. Mill enjoins us to follow the argument wherever it leads, even if it goes against commonly held opinion.
  • Fishes in Muddy Creek, Erie National Wildlife Refuge-Seneca Division, with Emphasis on Host Species for Federal and State-Listed Freshwater Mussels and State-Listed Fishes Final Project Report for the Erie National Wildlife Refuge

    Haynes, James M.; Wells, Scott M. (SUNY Brockport, Department of Environmental Science and Ecology, 2006-05)
    Muddy Creek, Crawford County, PA is one of 10 major sub-basins of the French Creek watershed. The portion of Muddy Creek that flows through the Erie National Wildlife Refuge-Seneca Division provides habitat for 22 species of freshwater mussels, including two federally- and state-listed as endangered and one federal candidate species. The purpose of this project was to sample for fishes in the portion of Muddy Creek flowing through the Erie National Wildlife Refuge-Seneca Division to determine the presence and distributions of host fishes for federally- and state-listed freshwater mussels and of state-listed fishes. We collected 48 species of fish (3,221 individuals) including 24 of the 31 species in the French Creek watershed reported to serve as mussel hosts (1,023 individuals) and seven of the 24 state-listed fishes (177 individuals) thought to live in the French Creek watershed. We present new fish data, the associations of freshwater mussels and their host fishes at 19 sampling sites, and the listing status (by the Pennsylvania Natural History Program) of the sampled fishes and reported mussels.
  • The Effects That Sport Specialization has on Youth Athletes

    Spulnick, Michael S (SUNY Brockport, Department of Kinesiology, Sport Studies, and Physical Education, 2023-12-28)
    Youth sport specialization is becoming more popular than ever. Many athletes, parents and coaches think that sport specialization is the best way to reach elite level status in a sport. However, athletes, parents and coaches don’t know all of the positive and negative effects of specialization in a sport. Whereas, sport specialization may help you gain skill development, it is also correlated with higher chances of overuse injuries, psychological stress, and burnout. The purpose of this study is to review the literature and investigate the effects of sport specialization on youth athletes. It was determined that specializing in a sport can allow an athlete to attain a higher level of performance. It was also determined that overuse injuries are the biggest disadvantage when specializing in a sport. Finally, it was determined that younger athletes are at more psychological and physical risk than older athletes.
  • Factors limiting colonization of western New York creeks by the Zebra Mussel (Dreissena polymorpha)

    Miller, Steven J.; Haynes, James M. (Journal of Freshwater Ecology, 1997)
    The Erie Canal in western New York state provides water to many streams during the summer and is a potential source of invasive species, such as the Zebra Mussel (Dreissena polymorpha). Yet the Zebra Mussel is not found in those streams except immediately downstream from where canal water enters them. Given appropriate physical habitat, water quality and an abundant source of veliger larvae, the factors limiting Zebra Mussel colonization in the stream we studied remain unknown, but three factors appear to be important: 1) Partial retention of veligers by the wetland through which the canal discharge flows, 2) Filtering of phytoplankton and veligers by the dense bed of adult Zebra Mussels at the beginning of the outfall channel from the canal to the creek, or 3) Inappropriate food quality (e.g., lack of phytoplankton with important fatty acid constituents) in the creek.
  • Swimming performance and behavior of rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) and white perch (Morone americana): effects of attaching telemetry transmitters

    Mellas, Ernest J.; Haynes, James M. (Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Science, 1985)
    We conducted experiments to determine effects of external, surgical, and stomach tag attachments on the swimming performance and behavior of Rainbow Trout (a representative long duration swimming species) and White Perch (a representative short duration swimming species). Only one rainbow trout changed dominance rank after dummy tag attachment. Subordinate trout had significantly lower weights than subdominant and dominant fish, but there were no significant differences in swimming exhaustion times. Externally tagged trout had significantly lower exhaustion times than other tagged trout and controls. White Perch did not establish dominance hierarchies, and there were no significant differences in exhaustion times among tagged White Perch and controls. Externally and surgically tagged White Perch contracted serious fungal infections during a 45-d survival study; however, few diseases and no survival problems were noted among tagged and untagged Rainbow Trout up to 21 d. Considering all factors, it appears that stomach tagging is the best method of transmitter attachment, except when regurgitation or stomach atrophy are likely to be encountered.
  • Comparison of Walleye Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) information with habitat features of a Walleye spawning stream

    Lowie, Christopher E.; Haynes, James M.; Walter, Ryan P. (Jounral of Freshwater Ecology, 2001-12)
    We compared habitat conditions in a stream where Walleye successfully produce fry and compared them to a nationally applicable Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) model for Walleye. During a 2-3-week migration period in each of 3 years, Walleye were observed spawning; eggs were collected primarily in April and fry in May each year. Water depths, velocities and temperatures were at the lower end of or below the optimum ranges described in the HSI for spawning Walleye; however, random sampling indicated that optimum conditions for these parameters generally did not exist in the stream. Substrate, dissolved oxygen, and pH in the stream were optimal according to the HSI. Our results indicate that predictions using the HSI alone are not sufficient to identify regional streams where Walleye might successfully establish viable populations.
  • Fall movements of Pacific Salmon in Lake Ontario and several tributaries

    Keleher, Christopher J.; Haynes, James M.; Nettles, David C.; Olson, Robert A.; Winter, Jimmy D. (New York Fish and Game Journal, 1985-07)
    In the fall of 1982, 15 radio-tagged Pacific Salmon exhibited typical pre-spawning and spawning movements in Lake Ontario and several of its tributaries. There were no significant differences in daily and hourly movement rates between Coho Salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) and Chinook Salmon (O. tshawytscha). Salmon homed strongly to streams where they had been stocked 2-3 years earlier (64%); correlations between precipitation events and movements in the lake, stream entries and stream exits were low (r < 0.27; and angler mortality among fish entering tributaries was high (78%).
  • Health Education Curriculum and Assessment

    Reyes, Henry (SUNY Brockport, Department of Education and Human Development, 2024-02)
    This emotional and mental health unit was designed to create a dynamic learning experience centered around fostering communication skills and strategies aligned with NYS and National Health Education Standards. Participants of this unit were provided with ample opportunities to learn, practice, and apply proven communication skills that contribute to the health and safety of themselves and others. The primary focus of the unit was to answer the essential question, "How can one use health strategies and communication skills to contribute to the health and safety of oneself and others?" through a comprehensive approach. Recent data has shown that learning the skill of communication with relationship management and emotional and mental health is one that adolescents in NY State need. Specifically, to the school community, this unit was created for (NYC Lab HS). The unit focused on teaching evidence-based verbal and non-verbal communication skills, including speaking and listening skills, and offered authentic role-playing experiences throughout the unit to help participants have multiple opportunities to practice and demonstrate their understanding of the communication and relationship management strategies/skills learned. The scaffolding approach of diagnostic, formative, and summative assessments supported participants in their quest to answer the unit's essential question and focus. This approach allowed participants to self-assess, clarify/understand, and further improve their understanding of the skill being learned and its health benefits. The approach of allowing students to assess their misunderstandings of a skill and its implementation in the real world, and then making observable adjustments based on their self-corrections and awareness, allowed participants to take ownership of their learning experience. This approach fostered an easy and confident transition of the use of the learned skills in a real-world situation, ultimately answering the unit's essential question/focus.
  • Benthic Macroinvertebrate communities of Southwestern Lake Ontario Following Invasion of Dreissens

    Haynes, James M.; Stewart, Timothy W. (International Association of Great Lakes Research, 1994)
    Changes in benthic macroinvertebrate communities inhabiting natural cobble and artificial reef substrates in southwestern Lake Ontario were quantified before and after the invasion of dreissenid mussels in the late 1980s. Dreissenids comprised 79% and 93% of the cobble and reef communities in 1991-1992 (post-invasion) and replaced the amphipod, Gammarus fasciatus, which was the most abundant species at both habitats in 1983 (pre-invasion). Total abundance of non-Dreissena species was significantly greater in 1991-1992 than in 1983. Comparisons of macroinvertebrate community similarity in 1983 and 1991-1992 indicated that previously established taxa did not change substantially between sampling periods, but their proportions in the community did. Although many factors may have contributed to the changes we observed, our results support theories that Dreissena is facilitating energy transfer to the benthos by pseudofecal/ fecal deposition and that mussel colonies are providing additional habitat for other invertebrate taxa.
  • . Benthic macroinvertebrate communities in southwestern Lake Ontario following invasion of Dreissena and Echinogammarus: 1983-2000.

    Haynes, James M.; Tisch, Nancy A.; Mayer, Christine M.; Rhyne, Randall S. (Journal of the North American Benthologic Society, 2005)
    Benthic macroinvertebrate communities were quantified at natural cobble and artificial reef sites in Lake Ontario in 1983 (7 y pre-Dreissena invasion) and in 1991-1992 and 1999-2000 (1-2 and 9-10 y post-Dreissena invasion, respectively). Overall, the natural cobble community had higher species diversity and community abundance than the artificial reef community. While taxonomic composition of both communities remained consistent during the study period, organism abundance (excluding Dreissena) increased sharply from 1983 to 1991-1992, and that all taxa declined to 1983 levels by 1999-2000. From 1991-1992 to 1999-2000, Dreissena bugensis, which mostly replaced D. polymorpha, and Echinogammarus ischnus (all invasive species) appeared in the studied community. We conclude that the transition from D. polymorpha to D. bugensis and processes associated with the ongoing oligotrophication of Lake Ontario are responsible for the reduced density of large-bodied Dreissena in the nearshore region of the lake, and that changes in the Dreissena population are largely responsible for changes in the non-Dreissena benthic macroinvertebrate community.
  • Survey of Buttonwood Creek, Monroe County, NY to Determine Habitat Availability for and Relative Abundance of a Species of Special Concern, the Pirate Perch (Aphredoderus sayanus)

    Haynes, James M. (SUNY Brockport Department of Biological Sciences, 1994-06-02)
    We determined how much suitable habitat for Pirate Perch remains in Buttonwood Creek, sampled those habitats to determine where the species still exists in the creek, and predicted the likely impact of a bridge replacement and associated channel alterations on the Pirate Perch population
  • Preliminary Survey of Fish Communities in Three Tributaries of the Braddock Bay Watershed.

    Haynes, James M. (SUNY Brockport, Department of Biological Sciences, 1987-11)
    SUNY Brockport collaborated with Monroe County, New York to assess fish communities in three tributaries of Braddock Bay with different development histories: Northrup Creek, Larkin Creek and Buttonwood Creek.
  • Building Global Relationships: OER and Collaborative Online International Learning Courses

    Orzech, Mary Jo; Zhang, Jie; Kegler, Jennifer; Pearlman (University of Rochester), Ann; Greenfield (Syracuse University), Victoria (Sage Journals, 2023)
    Using Open Educational Resources (OER) in Collaborative Online International Learning (COIL) courses provides students and faculty the opportunity to share content, enhance knowledge, and develop intercultural competence across geopolitical and other boundaries. Faculty perceptions at the research site regarding benefits and challenges of using OER are consistent with positive findings of other OER research that validate its potential. This case study describes experiences of two college courses taught with different international partners. It shares the journey of co-planning, implementing, and revising assignments highlighting OER instructional materials. Technology and accessibility considerations influence the curricular decisions for each course. They demonstrate how the timely availability of relevant OER content can be particularly impactful for international learning environments like COIL. The article underscores the faculty-librarian-instructional designer collaboration throughout the project and offers suggestions for future study.
  • Creating a Local Government Manager Position in New York: A Summary of Four Case Profiles

    Hattery, Michael; Watt, Celia (SUNY Brockport, Department of Public Administration, 2022)
    This policy brief summarizes the efforts of four communities in New York that took initiative to consider change in the administration of their local government. In particular they assessed the changes needed to create the position of a central manager or administrator for their communities. These local initiatives were reviewed and summarized in 2020-22 by the Public Management Program (PMP), Department of Public Administration, SUNY Brockport.
  • Creating a Manager/Administrator Position in New York State: Legal Considerations

    Hattery, Michael; Watt, Celia (SUNY Brockport. Department of Public Administration, 2024)
    This policy brief provides a summary of the options available in New York state law for cities, towns, and villages to create the position of manager or administrator. As might be expected, there are common features and variations across the three municipal types in the state.1 This brief on legal considerations is a supplement to recent work summarizing the efforts of four communities in New York that more recently took initiative to consider change in the administration of their local government. In particular they assessed the changes needed to create the position of a central manager or administrator for their communities. These local initiatives were reviewed and summarized in 2020-22 by the Public Management Program (PMP), Department of Public Administration, SUNY Brockport. Reference to the four cases and an overall summary are provided at the end of this policy brief.
  • Tobacco/Vaping Unit Plan Sketch

    Kenneally, Madeline (SUNY Brockport Department of Public Health and Health Education, 2023)
  • The DECIDE model: A guide to better health related decision making

    Fasce, Chris (SUNY Brockport, Department of Education and Human Development, 2023)
    This publication has been checked against freely available accessibility tools and deemed accessible. Should you have a problem accessing it, please email archives@brockport.edu for assistance.
  • Sex Education: A Plan for Students and Teachers to Stay Informed

    Dorval, Richard E. (SUNY Brockport, Department of Public Health and Health Administration, 2023)
  • Guide Students to Learn and Experience Effects of Alcohol and Other Drugs

    Cunningham, Courtney (Department of Public Health and Health Education, 2023)
  • The Effects That Sport Specialization has on Youth Athletes

    Spulnick, Michael S (SUNY Brockport, Department of Kinesiology, Sport Studies, and Physical Education, 2023-12-28)
    Youth sport specialization is becoming more popular than ever. Many athletes, parents and coaches think that sport specialization is the best way to reach elite level status in a sport. However, athletes, parents and coaches don’t know all of the positive and negative effects of specialization in a sport. Whereas, sport specialization may help you gain skill development, it is also correlated with higher chances of overuse injuries, psychological stress, and burnout. The purpose of this study is to review the literature and investigate the effects of sport specialization on youth athletes. It was determined that specializing in a sport can allow an athlete to attain a higher level of performance. It was also determined that overuse injuries are the biggest disadvantage when specializing in a sport. Finally, it was determined that younger athletes are at more psychological and physical risk than older athletes.

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