• Bilingual language acquisition & development and how bilingualism is addressed in the American school system

      Hartop, Nora Elizabeth (2018-05)
      In this paper I will define the various types of bilingualism in the specific contexts of Spanish-English bilingualism in the United States. I will discuss the benefits of a bilingual education. I will explore theories of bilingual language acquisition relating to language growth over time and the ability to distinguish speech sounds of languages. I will discuss brain development of a bilingual individual and the role of code switching as a key process in language acquisition. I will emphasize the importance of bilingual education programs such as dual language and immersion schools and how these schools function. I will also discuss the importance of linguistic diversity as it connects to cultural identity. I will discuss the implication of least-biased assessment in the field of speech-language pathology for bilingual students and the topic of standardized testing in multiple languages. Overall, I propose goals to make bilingual education a sustainable model for the future of bilingual language education in the American school system.
    • The economics of stress and education for the low income area schools of the USA

      Randazzo, Peter (2018-05)
      Economics, racism, and education all play a very important part in today’s society. The history of these themes in America have determined a state of existence for many minority and low income neighborhoods. This thesis attempts to show that because of inequality in America, schools in low income communities suffer, and thus the students themselves suffer. In order to completely change this negative feedback loop, where low income area students go into underprivileged schools to experience classrooms which lacks resources and low graduation rates come out to a racist and strife ridden community, we need to give more federal funding to low income area schools. Low income areas suffer high rates of stress as well which also diminish low income test scores and graduation rates. In order to help these communities from the inside out, improved federal funding targeting these struggling schools can even the playing field, and lower rates of stress.
    • The effect of poverty on child education (K-12) in public schools: what schools and the government can do to help student achievement

      Hunter, Hydia (2018-05)
      According to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR, 1948), everyone has the right to pursue an education which includes children. Whether or not everyone is receiving a quality education is debatable. There are a few different school systems, such as public, charter, private, catholic, gender strict schools, magnet and even homeschooling. Children are considered to be the most vulnerable population, especially in the United States (Azzi- Lessing, 2017). When it comes to the child welfare system in the United States, the needs of children are not adequately being met. Azzi- Lessing (2017) states that the United States biggest downfall is the government’s lack of concern for poor families. The lack of intervention contributes to trauma and the deprivation of the needs and well-being of children (Azzi-Lessing, 2017). Additionally, this includes the quality of education children in public schools receive, more specifically those living in poverty...In the United States, it is considered neglect if parents or guardians keep their children from attending school. Even if parents send their children to school, children living in poverty are more likely not attending schools that are adequately educating and providing their students with the tools needed for success. A good quality of education is not always something that is seen a right and in some cases a financial burden. What is the point of children attending school if the education is not engaging and allowing students to reach their full potential? There are many families in the world that are affected by poverty but 2.2 billion children worldwide are currently living in poverty (McKinney, 2014). One of the factors that definitely affects the quality of education a child receives is poverty. There is a clear educational achievement gap between those living in poverty compared to those children not living in poverty.
    • Expanding educational methods for students and staff: exploring non-traditional methods

      Porcari, Olivia (2019-12)
      According to the National Center for Education Statistics (2019), from the fall of 2000 to the fall of 2015 the population of children enrolled in public schools increased from 47.2 million to 50.4 million, and is projected to reach 52.1 million by the fall of 2027. The two million increase in the number of students enrolled in public schools is extremely significant given the current climate within the educational system in the United States. As the population of students in schools increases, schools have to be able to accommodate the needs of each of these students. The traditional educational model in public schools in place today already fails to meet the needs of all students and lacks individualized educational methods (Gao, 2014). Through analyzing the current system, alternative or non-traditional models of education, exploring the roles of educators, school social workers, counselors, and educational policies, interventions are recommended at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels to assist schools in changing to better fit the needs of all students as the population increases.
    • Gross motor development and the implications for learning

      Obergh, Rachel (2019-12)
      The purpose of this thesis is to identify the acquisition of developmentally appropriate gross motor and physical skills and to investigate the effects of incorporating physical activity into the classroom environment. I have explored current and foundational research literature to meet this goal with the intention, and hope that my findings will initiate further discussion and research work in this increasingly important area of development and curriculum for children. As an elementary and middle school student at the Progressive School of Long Island, I became intrigued by the high success rate of the students. I began to look for a common reason and immediately recognized the potential correlation between movement and learning. Every morning at the Progressive School, the entire student body gathered in the gym for a yoga inspired movement period. Throughout the day, movement was encouraged through classroom housekeeping, and running errands. The students also had outdoor recess every day, except in severe weather conditions. We brought boots, hats and gloves and played in the snow, helped rake the leaves and maintained our own garden. Play was so ingrained that we automatically created recess games combining physical and mental challenges.