• Effects of the Literature Circle Strategy on participation of English Language Learners.

      Balone, Erika M. (2015)
      A common issue in education classes comprised of English language learners is a lack of participation in the classroom. The purpose of this research was to determine if the use of literature circles would have an impact on the number of times students raised their hands to participate during a book discussion. The participants were 4th grade students in two ELA classrooms within an urban elementary school located in western New York. This study included six lessons based on chapters in a book, three of which utilized the literature circle strategy, and three that did not. The results of this study were measured based on the number of times students participated by raising their hand during the discussions to see if students participation increased when using the literature circle strategy. Results determined that in this study, participation was positively affected by the use of literature circles.
    • The Impact of Background Music on Student Reading Comprehension

      Seewagen, Amanda (State University of New York at Fredonia, 2019-05)
      Reading is the foundation for lifelong learning. It has been shown that music has an impact on students learning depending on what music you use in the classroom (Rashidi & Faham, 2011; Chew, Yu, Chua, & Gan, 2016; Chou, 2010). This brought up the problem of music impacting students reading comprehension. This problem led to the research question of does background music have an impact on students reading comprehension. An online survey was used to find if middle school general education and special education teachers used music in their classroom and if the music has an impact on the students reading comprehension. The results showed three major themes. The first theme was that music helps the student’s comprehension. The second theme was that the music teachers used in their classrooms are a range from upbeat to slow soothing music. The third theme was that music that the participants who used music in their classroom found their students to be more engaged and focus more on the lesson. The teachers also stated that they would also recommend using music in the classroom to other learners. These findings were important to the research because they showed that more research needs to be done on this topic. The teachers found differing results from the research stated in this study. There are limitations and recommendations offered for a future study.
    • Middle School Reading Comprehension Strategies and Metacognition.

      Kochanski, Kiri (State University of New York at Fredonia, 2018-08)
      By the end of each school year it is the expectation that students meet the Common Core State Standards. With this expectation, students must use reading comprehension skills in order to meet these standards. The goal of this research was to understand more about the strategies students are or are not using before, during and after reading, how they are selecting these strategies and how they are using these strategies to support their reading. The research for this study was conducted with three middle school students (Grades 6-8) who were recruited from a single classroom. The participants completed a QRI-6 assessment, reading of a passage and an interview. The data collected was analyzed qualitatively using descriptive coding and thematic coding (Saldaña, 2016). The main findings of this research were that the participants were using current reading strategies used in their classrooms, using strategies to track their reading progress and that they were unable to remember prior reading experience using reading strategies.
    • Using Think-Aloud Strategy to improve English reading comprehension for 9th grade students in Saudi Arabia.

      Alaraj, Mohammed (2015)
      This study was designed to investigate what effect the incorporation of the Think-Aloud reading strategy into a Saudi Arabian middle school curriculum would have on the reading ability of students, in terms of both information retention and comprehension of material. Two groups of 23 students were studied. One group was designated as the control group, receiving traditional instruction, and the other was the treatment group, which received explicit instruction using the Think-Aloud strategy. A total of four assessments were administered to obtain data, and were then graded on a rubric scale for analysis. The results showed that the students in the treatment group had, in the majority of cases, improved their reading comprehension; as measured by the assessments, while the control group’s scores remained the same. These results lead the researcher to conclude that the incorporation of the Think-Aloud strategy has much potential as a topic of research for incorporation into future curriculum in Saudi Arabia.