• Area Awareness : a preadolescent perspective.

      Bland, Reid (2013-01-25)
      No author abstract.
    • Does improvement of multiplication fluency improve fifth graders' overall Math achievement?

      Jackson Jr., Ralph E. (2014)
      New federal common core standards adopted by New York State require students to master rigorous material at earlier grades than previously. It is a concern for teachers that without a strong foundation in math fact fluency students will not be able to master the demands of the new curriculum. A study involving 10 and 11-year-old students, at a rural elementary school district, was conducted to determine how students’ math fact multiplication fluency, for numbers 0-10, affected their overall math achievement. Students’ math achievement was based on pre and post intervention STAR test results. The acronym STAR originally stood for the Standardized Test for the Assessment of Reading, but the Renaissance Learning has since expanded into the area of math. The study combined multiple intervention strategies to re-mediate the students with the lowest scores on STAR and/or multiplication fluency testing. Results of this study indicated that the interventions used were successful and that the students who received these interventions also showed significant growth in their overall math achievement based on STAR test results.
    • Effective strategies for teaching content vocabulary to English Language Learners

      Brightman, Kerri A. (2015)
      The number of English language learners (ELLs) enrolled and being educated in schools in the United States is increasing. At the same time, there is greater accountability for the academic performance of ELLs, but they continue demonstrate poor performance in content areas such as Math and English Language Arts (ELA). This case study examined the preparedness for and the effectiveness of the instructional strategies being used by a group of 8th grade math and ELA teachers when teaching their content vocabulary to ELLs. It also investigated the challenges encountered by these teachers when working with ELLs, and examined their attitudes and beliefs about having ELLs in their classrooms. Data was obtained from teachers through the use of a observations. The results determined that this group of teachers had very little experience teaching ELLs and had received negligible professional training in preparation for teaching the ELLs. The results also showed some limited use of effective instructional strategies in their classrooms, and that these teachers view their instruction as not having a positive impact on the academic development of ELLs. Implications with regard to the need for additional training and a need for future research are discussed.
    • Effects of flipping the classroom on suburban middle school math students.

      Alswat, Mohammad (2014)
      The purpose of this research is to examine the effects of using the strategy “flipping the classroom" with students. One eighth grade math class was selected to be used from a school in Western New York. The teacher of this classroom taught seven math units using traditional homework and classwork, while four of the units were taught with a flipped classroom. Data was collected through a Likert survey for the students, an interview with the teacher, and the analysis of the students’ grades. Results of the data show that the students generally like the strategy of flipping the classroom. The students also scored 3.11 points higher on average on their tests with a flipped classroom. The teacher also said mostly positive comments about this strategy. She and her students were more comfortable using it in the classroom because their class time was more productive for them. Some suggestions for future research and limitations are discussed in this paper to provide evidence that flipping the classroom can be an effective strategy in certain classes.
    • Have You Met Ric?

      Gilman, Jennifer (2013-10-21)
      This research explores misconceptions about metric conversion and the difficulties behind metric unit estimation. It was believed that middle school students would be able to convert from a large to a small metric unit more accurately than converting from a small to a large metric unit. Furthermore, it was also hypothesized that middle school students would be able to estimate units smaller than a meter more accurately than units of a meter or larger. During the study, students completed a ten-problem assessment containing conversion and estimation questions. The assessment was generated by studying past New York state exams. After the assessment, students completed a six-question follow-up survey. The results of the study indicated that students struggle with conversion questions regardless of the direction of the conversion. Additional results revealed that students were more accurate when they converted linear distances versus volume and capacity; students could estimate units smaller than a meter more accurately than units of a meter or larger, and there was no significant difference in the accuracy of estimation based on grade level. These results pose multiple implications for teachers. Educators need to be prepared to spend equal amounts of time teaching different types of conversions and educators need to find more time to teach and practice estimation during everyday activities.
    • How Much Is Enough?

      Steger, Justin L. (2013-01-17)
      No author abstract.
    • Students' visual estimation of angles and their proficiency with angular measurement tools.

      Brydges, Courtney E. (2013-10-21)
      This study examines students' perceptions of and skill with angular measurement. Its underlying purpose is to analyze students' level of proficiency and appropriate understanding of angular measurement and associated measurement tools. It was hypothesized that eighth grade students would more accurately determine the measurement of a given angle to the nearest degree using visual estimation as opposed to using a protractor. The remainder of this study compares eighth grade students' assessments with university students' assessments. It was further hypothesized that neither age nor gender would influence a student's estimate despite the size or position of the angle. Subsequently, it was proposed that students, regardless of their age or gender, would have the most difficulty estimating acute angles within 10° of 0° and obtuse angles within 10° of 180°. The results of this study indicate that eighth grade students do not have sufficient knowledge in using angular measurement tools. Additional results revealed that both gender and age were found to have statistical significance in the visual estimation of angles and overwhelming evidence suggested that the least difficult angles to estimate were those close to 90 degrees.
    • A study of middle school and college students' misconceptions about solving multi-step linear equations.

      Powell, Amber N. (2013-01-11)
      This study examines the types of mistakes that students make solving multi-step linear equations. During this study, students completed a 15-problem test containing different types of multi-step linear equations appropriate for 8th graders according to the state and national mathematics standards. Students were not allowed to use a calculator. The instrument was generated by using past state tests and by polling professors of mathematics. The number of mistakes made for each mathematical property was recorded. The scores were compared to a survey that students answered reporting their confidence in solving these types of problems. The results of the study indicated that problems containing negative numbers and moving terms to the opposite side of the equal sign were incorrect most frequently among all student participants. Additional results revealed that eighth graders made more mistakes than college-level students, the types of mistakes made were different based on the grade level of the participants, males made fewer mistakes than females and there was a difference in the types of mistakes made based on gender.
    • A study on solution techniques used by eighth grade mathematics students while solving systems of equations.

      Hood, Shane M. (2013-10-21)
      This research examines the effects of instructional order in regard to preference and achievement of solution techniques when solving systems of equations algebraically. It is hypothesized that students in an eighth grade mathematics classroom will have a preference for the technique they use for solving a system of equations. Additionally, that preference will be determined by which technique was introduced to the student first. To test this hypothesis students from four different classes were divided into two groups, students who would learn substitution first and students who would learn elimination first. Each group would be introduced to the alternate technique directly after the first. After both groups were familiar with the two techniques, an assessment was given tracking and comparing achievement and technique used on each problem between the students in the two groups. Additionally, a survey was given directly after the assessment to determine how the students felt about both techniques and trends from these surveys were also compared.