• Effectiveness of the Chance Jars Game and Mystery Motivators to reduce disruptive behaviors in minority students living in poverty.

      Stephenson, Jillian K. (2015)
      Disruptive behaviors negatively affect the learning environment by taking time away from academic instruction (McKissick, 2012). Studies have indicated that these behaviors are prevalent in high risk schools, characterized by high rates of poverty among their students (Webster-Stratton, Reid, & Stoolmiller, 2008). Furthermore, 56% of students in high-poverty schools with large minority populations reported that disruptive behavior by other students get in the way of their learning (Webster et al., 2008). The current study examined the effectiveness of the “Chance Jars” game and Mystery Motivators on the disruptive behaviors of minority students living in poverty. The study was conducted in a second grade classroom in a small metropolitan school district in Western New York during afternoon mathematics and listening and learning instruction. Results of the study indicated a mean percent change of -2.6% from the first intervention phase to the second of target student disruptive behaviors during mathematics; only one target student showed a decrease of disruptive behaviors from the first intervention phase to the second during listening and learning (-23.66%). The present study was completed with a mean fidelity score of 94.05%.
    • The impact of Classwide Peer Tutoring for students with emotional or behavior disorders.

      Jo, Alex (2015)
      This study investigated how ClassWide Peer Tutoring can be effective for students with Emotional or Behavioral Disorders. This research was a quantitative study and followed an A-B-A design, where the first A was the initial baseline observations, B was the ClassWide Peer Tutoring intervention, and the second A was the baseline reintroduced after the intervention was withdrawn. The study was six weeks and each phase of the research design was for two weeks with two observations each week. The study examined data from a single subject participant with Emotional or Behavioral Disorders in an 8th grade mathematics class. Results from this study found on-task behaviors increased while off-task behaviors decreased when ClassWide Peer Tutoring was implemented during intervention. In addition to improved behavior, academic accuracy was better with ClassWide Peer Tutoring. Implications for further research include lengthening the research study to an A-B-A design and examining the differences between student thought incentives and teacher incentives.