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dc.contributor.authorGreiser, Melissa
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-05T17:18:17Z
dc.date.available2021-06-05T17:18:17Z
dc.date.issued2021-05
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12648/1747
dc.description.abstractImplicit bias seems to be at the heart of a number of pressing societal problems. Efforts have been made to reduce bias through spreading information about implicit attitudes and implementing bias training programs. To adequately address these issues, though, greater attention needs to be given to how individuals process and respond to information about implicit bias. The current study explored moral judgments of behaviors stemming from implicit bias judgments, with a focus on gender-based discrimination. We also considered how ingroup status (sharing the same gender as the perpetrator) may affect these judgments. Participants read a short scenario about a man or woman who exhibited either implicit or explicit bias toward the opposite gender; participants then reported their judgments of the perpetrator’s moral responsibility. Results revealed that less responsibility was attributed to behavior stemming from implicit (relative to explicit) bias. Implicit bias reduced responsibility regardless of whether or not the perpetrator was an ingroup member (same gender as the participant). Additionally, both male and female participants held the male perpetrator more responsible for his actions than the female perpetrator. This research provides a clearer picture of how people evaluate implicit bias, which is central to understanding why implicitly biased behaviors often result in minor consequences for the perpetrators. Future research should seek to more fully understand how individuals process and respond to information regarding implicit bias in an effort to reduce any potential negative consequences of spreading such information and construct the most effective methods for reducing bias.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectResearch Subject Categories::SOCIAL SCIENCES::Social sciences::Psychologyen_US
dc.subjectBiasen_US
dc.subjectMoral responsibilityen_US
dc.subjectDiscriminationen_US
dc.subjectSocial psychology -- Researchen_US
dc.subjectStereotypesen_US
dc.subjectIntergroup relations
dc.titleImplicit bias and moral responsibility: does ingroup membership matter?en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.versionNAen_US
refterms.dateFOA2021-06-05T17:18:18Z
dc.description.institutionSUNY College at New Paltzen_US
dc.description.departmentPsychologyen_US
dc.description.degreelevelMSen_US


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Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International