• American Politics and the Environment, Second Edition

      Daynes, Byron W.; Sussman, Glen; West, Jonathan P. (SUNY Press, 2016-03-01)
      Changing our environmental policy has been at the forefront of many political discussions. But how can we make this change come about? In American Politics and the Environment, Second Edition, Byron W. Daynes, Glen Sussman and Jonathan P. West argue it is critical that we must understand the politics of environmental decision making and how political actors operate within political institutions. Blending behavioral and institutional approaches, each chapter combines discussion of an institution along with sidebars focusing on a particular environmental topic as well as a personal profile of a key decision maker. A central focus of this second edition is the emergence of global climate change as a key issue. Although the scientific community can provide research findings to policy makers, politics can create conflicts, tensions, and delays in the crafting of effective and necessary environmental policy responses. Daynes, Sussman, and West help us understand the role of politics in the policy making process and why institutional players such as the president, Congress, and interest groups succeed or fail in responding to important environmental challenges.
    • Austerity and the Labor Movement

      Schiavone, Michael (SUNY Press, 2016-12-01)
      Austerity policies have become the new norm throughout both the developed and developing world. Indeed, austerity has become the new buzz word in the lexicon of politicians from across the political spectrum. At the same time austerity measures have been met with mass protest, the most famous example of which is the Occupy Movement. In the not-too-distant past it would have been the labor movement at the forefront resisting policies that arguably disproportionally target working people and their families. Throughout the twentieth century it was the labor movement that fought for all working people. However, there is an increasing assumption that the labor movement is unable to adequately defend workers from the onslaught of austerity measures. Austerity and the Labor Movement analyzes whether this assumption is indeed true. Examining the labor movements in the US, UK, Greece, Ireland, and Spain, Michael Schiavone provides a systematic explanation of the appeal of austerity policies in certain circles and why the labor movement in each of these countries has been largely unsuccessful in overturning such policies. He argues that the labor movement needs to make major changes and embrace social movement unionism if it has any hope to stop its decline and have any chance to successfully fight against austerity and neoliberalism more generally. Print versions available for purchase at https://sunypress.edu/Books/A/Austerity-and-the-Labor-Movement
    • Coping with Terrorism

      Reuveny, Rafael; Thompson, William R. (SUNY Press, 2010-11-01)
      Terrorism is imprinted on Western society's consciousness. Nearly every week a terrorist attack occurs in the world. The academic world, in attempting to understand terrorism, has often been limited to descriptive work rather than analysis, and has produced surprisingly few mainstream collections on the subject. Coping with Terrorism offers a collection of essays that ask: who are terrorists, what are their goals, who supports them, and how can we combat their tactics? The essays are scholarly, rather than journalistic or ideological, in their approach. As such, they scrutinize a much-discussed and prevalent subject and bring it into the mainstream for international relations.
    • Immigrant Protest

      Marciniak, Katarzyna; Tyler, Imogen (SUNY Press, 2014-11-01)
      The last decade has witnessed a global explosion of immigrant protests, political mobilizations by irregular migrants and pro-migrant activists. This volume considers the implications of these struggles for critical understandings of citizenship and borders. Scholars, visual and performance artists, and activists explore the ways in which political activism, art, and popular culture can work to challenge the multiple forms of discrimination and injustice faced by "illegal" and displaced peoples. They focus on a wide range of topics, including desire and neo-colonial violence in film, visibility and representation, pedagogical function of protest, and the role of the arts and artists in the explosion of political protests that challenge the precarious nature of migrant life in the Global North. They also examine shifting practices of boundary making and boundary taking, changing meanings and lived experiences of citizenship, arguing for a noborder politics enacted through a "noborder scholarship. "
    • Two Sides of a Barricade

      Scholl, Christian (SUNY Press, 2013-01-01)
      Two Sides of a Barricade argues that to construct global democracy, conflict and dissent must be taken seriously. Christian Scholl explores the political significance of the confrontations within four sites of interaction: bodies, space, communication, and law. Each site of struggle provides a different entry point to understand the influence of protester and police tactics on each other. At the same time, the four sites of struggle allow a comprehensive analysis of how the contestation of global hegemonic forces during summit protests trigger a preemptive shift in social control through increased deployment of biopolitical forms of power. Print versions available for purchase at https://sunypress.edu/Books/T/Two-Sides-of-a-Barricade
    • World Politics at the Edge of Chaos

      Kavalski, Emilian (SUNY Press, 2015-06-01)
      Why are policymakers, scholars, and the general public so surprised when the world turns out to be unpredictable? World Politics at the Edge of Chaos suggests that the study of international politics needs new forms of knowledge to respond to emerging challenges such as the interconnectedness between local and transnational realities; between markets, migration, and social movements; and between pandemics, a looming energy crisis, and climate change. Asserting that Complexity Thinking (CT) provides a much-needed lens for interpreting these challenges, the contributors offer a parallel assessment of the impact of CT to anthropocentric and non-anthropocentric (post-human) International Relations. Using this perspective, the result should be less surprise when confronting the dynamism of a fragile and unpredictable global life.