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dc.contributor.authorBiederman, J.
dc.contributor.authorPetty, C. R.
dc.contributor.authorFried, R.
dc.contributor.authorDoyle, A. E.
dc.contributor.authorSpencer, T.
dc.contributor.authorSeidman, L. J.
dc.contributor.authorGross, L.
dc.contributor.authorPoetzl, K.
dc.contributor.authorFaraone, S. V.
dc.date.accessioned2021-04-15T14:48:22Z
dc.date.available2021-04-15T14:48:22Z
dc.date.issued2007-08
dc.identifier.issn0001-690X
dc.identifier.eissn1600-0447
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1600-0447.2007.01008.x
dc.identifier.pii10.1111/j.1600-0447.2007.01008.x
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12648/1690
dc.description.abstractObjective: Although individuals with attention deficit‐hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) commonly exhibit deficits in executive functions that greatly increase the morbidity of the disorder, all available information on the subject is cross sectional. Method: Males (n = 85) 9–22 years with ADHD followed over 7 years into young adulthood were assessed on measures of sustained attention/vigilance, planning and organization, response inhibition, set shifting and categorization, selective attention and visual scanning, verbal and visual learning, and memory. A binary definition of executive function deficits (EFDs) was defined based on a subject manifesting at least two abnormal tests 1.5 standard deviations from controls. Results: The majority of subjects maintained EFDs over time (kappa: 0.41, P < 0.001; sensitivity: 55%, specificity: 85%, positive predictive value: 69%, and negative predictive value: 75%). Conclusion: Considering the morbidity of EFDs, these findings stress the importance of their early recognition for prevention and early intervention strategies. EFDs are stable over time.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherWileyen_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1.1
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectPsychiatry and Mental healthen_US
dc.subjectExecutive functions; attention deficithyperactivity disorder; neuropsychology; stabilityen_US
dc.titleStability of executive function deficits into young adult years: a prospective longitudinal follow-up study of grown up males with ADHDen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.source.journaltitleActa Psychiatrica Scandinavicaen_US
dc.source.volume116
dc.source.issue2
dc.source.beginpage129
dc.source.endpage136
dc.description.versionAMen_US
refterms.dateFOA2021-04-15T14:48:23Z
dc.description.institutionUpstate Medical Universityen_US
dc.description.departmentPsychiatryen_US
dc.description.degreelevelN/Aen_US


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