Recent Submissions

  • Prepare, partner, protest, propose, and persevere: Advocating for a dedicated information literacy classroom

    Hendley, Michelle (2020-10-02)
    In 2011, SUNY Oneonta began planning for the partial renovation of the James M. Milne Library to accommodate three offices and their staff: the tutoring center, accessibility resources office, and the faculty center. In the initial planning stages, there was no discussion of the inclusion of dedicated information literacy classrooms.
  • The crowding-out effect of tobacco expenditure on household spending patterns in Bangladesh

    Husain, Muhammad Jami; Datta, Biplab Kumar; Virk-Baker, Mandeep; Parascandola, Mark; Khondker, Bazlul Haque (PLOS, 2018-10)
    Background: Tobacco consumption constitutes a sizable portion of household consumption expenditure, which can lead to reduced expenditures on other basic commodities. This is known as the crowding-out effect. This study analyzes the crowding-out effect of tobacco consumption in Bangladesh, and the research findings have relevance for strengthening the tobacco control for improving health and well-being. Methods: We analyzed data from the Bangladesh Household Income and Expenditure Survey 2010 to examine the differences in consumption expenditure pattern between tobacco user and non-user households. We further categorize tobacco user households in three mutually exclusive groups of smoking-only, smokeless-only, and dual (both smoking and smokeless); and investigated the crowding-out effects for these subgroups. We compared the mean expenditure shares of different types of households, and then estimated the conditional Engel curves for various expenditure categories using Seemingly Unrelated Regression (SUR) method. Crowding-out was considered to have occurred if estimated coefficient of the tobacco use indicator was negative and statistically significant. Results: We find that tobacco user households on average allocated less in clothing, housing, education, energy, and transportation and communication compared to tobacco non-user households. The SUR estimates also confirmed crowding-out in these consumption categories. Mean expenditure share of food and medical expenditure of tobacco user households, however, are greater than those of tobacco non-user households. Albeit similar patterns observed for different tobacco user households, there were differences in magnitudes depending on the type of tobacco-use, rural-urban locations and economic status. Conclusion: Policy measures that reduce tobacco use could reduce displacement of commodities by households with tobacco users, including those commodities that can contribute to human capital investments.
  • Role of Phytoestrogens in Cancer Therapy

    Virk-Baker, Mandeep; Nagy, Tim R.; Barnes, Stephen (Theime Medical Publishers, 2010)
    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide, and the numbers of new cancer cases are expected to continue to rise. The main goals of cancer therapy include removing the primary tumor, preventing the spread of distant metastases, and improving survival and quality of life for the patients. To attain these goals of cancer therapy, the combination of different chemotherapeutics, as opposed to the conventional single-agent treatment, is an emerging area of research. Given the potential risks of drug toxicity in such treatment, the focus is to have a second compound that increases the anticancer potential of the primary agent but which reduces toxicity. There is an ever growing interest in treatment with natural compounds, such as plant phytoestrogens, as an adjuvant cancer therapy along with conventional cancer therapy. The question remains whether or not adding these compounds to the cancer therapy regimen as a second agent would be beneficial, and if they are safe to be used among cancer patients. The current literature suggests that phytoestrogen treatment is capable of inducing G2/M cell cycle arrest in a number of cancer cell lines, as well as upregulating cell cycle inhibitory molecules. Phytoestrogen therapy has been shown to inhibit inflammation, angiogenesis and metastases in various in vivo tumor models, and pronounced benefits have been observed when combined with radiation therapy. The lack of side effects from phase I and II clinical trials of phytoestrogens in cancer therapy points towards their safety, but to further understand their added benefit clinical studies with large sample sizes are required. We have reviewed the recent research studies in these areas in an attempt to find evidence for their role in cancer therapy as well as safety.
  • Comparative analysis of diet and tobacco use among households in Bangladesh

    Virk-Baker, Mandeep; Husain, Muhammad Jami; Parascandola, Mark (European Publishing, 2019-03)
    Introduction: While studies from developed countries have reported dietary differences between tobacco users and non-users, less is known about the influence of tobacco on diet in developing countries where malnutrition is a major public health challenge. Methods: In this study we used the nationally representative Household Income Expenditure Survey 2010 from Bangladesh. Detailed household-level food consumption data including both ethnic and region-specific foods were collected over 14 days, consisting of 7 visits each collecting two days of dietary recall information. Results: Out of 12240 households, 2061 consumed smoking tobacco only (16.8%), 3284 consumed smokeless tobacco only (26.8%), and 3348 consumed both (27.4%). Overall, 71% of the households reported expenditure on tobacco (smoking and/or smokeless) and were considered any-tobacco use households. Our results indicate that after controlling for household expenditure, household size, household child to adult ratio, place of residence (urban/rural), and region fixed effects, any-tobacco households consumed significantly lower amounts (g/ day) of milk and dairy products (β = -17.11, p<0.01) and oil/fat (β = -10.30, p<0.01) compared to tobacco non-use households (β: adjusted mean difference in food amount g/day/household). Conversely, consumption of cereal grains (β = 152.46, p<0.0001) and sugar (β = 8.16, p<0.0001) were significantly higher among any-tobacco households compared to non-tobacco households. We observed similar patterns for smoking-only, smokeless-only, and dual tobacco product households. Conclusions: Evidence of dietary differences between tobacco-use and non-use households may play an important role in developing strategies to address poor diet and malnutrition among tobacco-use households in a developing country like Bangladesh. This study provides one of the first reports addressing diet in relation to tobacco use from a developing country, particularly using nationally representative data. The finding that tobacco-use households have poorer dietary consumption than non-use households suggests that it is important to address tobacco use in the context of nutrition and development programs in low-income environments.
  • The Economics of Cupcakes: A Class Activity on the Law of Diminishing Marginal Product

    Storrie, Christine L. (Department of Economics and Finance, Middle Tennessee State University, 2020)
    Economics courses are typically lecture-based. This paper provides an alternative to the traditional chalk and talk method of classroom instruction by outlining a class activity that illustrates the concept of diminishing marginal productivity. The activity incorporates an experiment-based learning approach with minimal direction from the instructor and offers an alternative or complement to traditional lecture-based instruction methods. Although the main lesson is the law of diminishing marginal productivity, other economic concepts can also be incorporated and learned from this experiment. Variations of the experiment and possible outcomes are also discussed.
  • Facial asymmetry tracks genetic diversity among Gorilla subspecies

    McGrath, Kate; Eriksen, Amandine B.; García-Martínez, Daniel; Galbany, Jordi; Gómez-Robles, Aida; Massey, Jason S.; Fatica, Lawrence M.; Glowacka, Halszka; Arbenz-Smith, Keely; Muvunyi, Richard; et al. (The Royal Society, 2022-02)
    Mountain gorillas are particularly inbred compared to other gorillas and even the most inbred human populations. As mountain gorilla skeletal material accumulated during the 1970s, researchers noted their pronounced facial asymmetry and hypothesized that it reflects a population-wide chewing side preference. However, asymmetry has also been linked to environmental and genetic stress in experimental models. Here, we examine facial asymmetry in 114 crania from three Gorilla subspecies using 3D geometric morphometrics. We measure fluctuating asymmetry (FA), defined as random deviations from perfect symmetry, and population-specific patterns of directional asymmetry (DA). Mountain gorillas, with a current population size of about 1000 individuals, have the highest degree of facial FA (explaining 17% of total facial shape variation), followed by Grauer gorillas (9%) and western lowland gorillas (6%), despite the latter experiencing the greatest ecological and dietary variability. DA, while significant in all three taxa, explains relatively less shape variation than FA does. Facial asymmetry correlates neither with tooth wear asymmetry nor increases with age in a mountain gorilla subsample, undermining the hypothesis that facial asymmetry is driven by chewing side preference. An examination of temporal trends shows that stress-induced developmental instability has increased over the last 100 years in these endangered apes.
  • The Impact of Stock Liquidity on Audit Pricing

    Qin, Juan (North American Business Press, 2020)
    This paper investigates whether firms’ stock liquidity is associated with audit fees. Stock liquidity can increase institutional monitoring by either helping investors overcome free-rider problems to intervene in management decisions, or disciplining management through the threat of exit. Given that stock liquidity can enhance institutional monitoring, firms with higher stock liquidity may have incentives to utilize high quality audits which always result in higher audit fees to satisfy the demand of institutional investors. Consistent with these arguments, I find that firms with liquid stocks are more likely to pay significantly higher audit fees.
  • Strategies for Conducting Post-Culture-of-Poverty Research on Poverty, Meaning, and Behavior

    Seale, Elizabeth (Springer, 2020)
    Sociologists widely agree that poverty is the effect of structural factors; however, understanding the ways in which poverty is experienced and constructed with reference to culture remains a compelling area of scholarship. In a society where culture of poverty ideas retain popularity, attributing meanings and behavior to people in poverty is complicated and contentious. Many scholars adroitly navigate these waters, but we lack clear guidelines on how to examine the behavior and perceptions of people in poverty without misrepresenting and potentially stigmatizing research subjects. I argue that to avoid problems of overgeneralization and what I call “unacknowledged comparison,” we must engage with multiple points of observation and empirical comparisons. In addition, it makes sense to center sets of circumstances that affect behavior rather than generalizing the behavior or the culture that influences that behavior. Finally, I argue that the unit of analysis should be at the relational level rather than the individual level. The implications of failing to attend to these issues include continued misunderstanding of and unwarranted stigmatization of people in poverty.
  • Redesigning the Healthcare Model to Address Obesity Problem Using Incentives Delivered through a Combination of Processes and Mobile Technologies

    Lokshina, Izabella V.; Bartolacci, Michael R. (IGI Global, 2013)
    Obesity and other lifestyle-related illnesses are among the top global healthcare challenges today. Obesity in young population is an alarming predictor for obesity in adulthood, but also entails different short term health complications. Knowing how to stay healthy is not enough to motivate young individuals to adopt healthy lifestyles. However, relevant progress can be achieved with use of incentives delivered through combination of processes and mobile technologies. Recognizing effectiveness of new healthcare model to prevent obesity in young population, an innovative multi-dimensional cross-disciplinary ICT framework should be developed, which uses sophisticated game mechanics to motivate behavior changes towards healthier lifestyles and supports three main functions: individual & environmental monitoring, including wearable sensors, mobile phones and multimedia diaries; feedback to users, presenting personalized healthy options for alternative lifestyles; and social connectivity, encouraging involvement in sharing experiences through social networks and social engagement. System development should be based on user-centered design, social and networking games and online education and supported by a wide stakeholder’s ecosystem, including health authorities and research institutions, industries and academia from the ICT and healthcare sectors, as well as food companies and SMEs.
  • Addressing Ethical Concerns of Big Data as a Prerequisite for a Sustainable Big Data Industry

    Lokshina, Izabella V.; Lanting, Cees J. M. (IGI Global, 2018)
    Big Data combines information from diverse sources to create knowledge, make better predictions and tailor services. This article analyzes Big Data both as a technology and an industrial activity, and identifies the points of weakness and ethical concerns created by current business practices. Potential solutions for these concerns are proposed in order to build and maintain business practices respecting ethical standards as a prerequisite for a sustainable Big Data industry. This article covers both the usage of Big Data by industry and the development of a sustainable Big Data services industry.
  • Qualitative Evaluation of IoT-Driven eHealth: KM, Business Models, Deployment and Evolution

    Lokshina, Izabella V.; Lanting, Cees J. M. (IGI Global, 2018)
    This article explains that eHealth has major potential, and its adoption may be considered necessary to achieve increased ambulant and remote medical care, increased quality, reduced personnel needs, and reduced costs potential in healthcare. In this paper, the authors try to give a reasonable, qualitative evaluation of IoT-driven eHealth from theoretical and practical viewpoints. They look at associated knowledge management issues and contributions of IoT to eHealth, along with requirements, benefits, limitations and entry barriers. Important attention is given to security and privacy issues. Finally, the conditions for business plans and accompanying value chains are realistically analyzed. The resulting implementation issues and required commitments are also discussed. The authors confirm that IoT-driven eHealth can happen and will happen; however, much more needs to be addressed to bring it back in sync with medical and general technological developments in an industrial state-of-the-art perspective and to recognize and get timely the benefits.
  • Thinking eHealth: A Mathematical Background of an Individual Health Status Monitoring System to Empower Young People to Manage their Health

    Lokshina, Izabella V.; Bartolacci, Michael R. (IGI Global, 2014)
    This paper focuses on a mathematical background of an individual health status monitoring system to empower young people to manage their health. The proposed health status monitoring system uses symptoms observed with mobile sensing devices and prior information about health and environment (provided it exists) to define individual physical and psychological status. It assumes that a health status identification process is influenced by many parameters and conditions. It has a flexible logical inference system providing positive psychological influence on young people since full acceptance of recommendations on their behavioral changes towards healthy lifestyles is reached and a correct interpretation is guaranteed. The model and algorithms of the individual health status monitoring system are developed based on the composition inference rule in Zadeh's fuzzy logic. The model allows us to include in the algorithms of logical inference the possibility of masking (by means of a certain health condition) the symptoms of other health situations as well as prior information (if it exists) regarding health and environment. The algorithms are generated by optimizing the truth of a single natural “axiom”, which connects an individual health status (represented by classes of health situations) with symptoms and matrices of influence of health situations on symptoms and masking of symptoms. The new algorithms are fairly different from traditional algorithms, in which the result is produced in the course of numerous single processing rules. Therefore, the use of a composition inference rule makes a health status identification process faster and the obtained results more precise and efficient comparing to traditional algorithms.
  • Analysis of Turbo Code Behavior with Extrinsic Information Transfer Charts in High-Speed Wireless Data Services

    Lokshina, Izabella V.; Zhong, Hua (IGI Global, 2017)
    This paper examines turbo codes that are currently introduced in many international standards and implemented in numerous advanced communication systems, and evaluates the process of extrinsic information transfer (EXIT). The convergence properties of the iterative decoding process, associated with a given turbo-coding scheme, are estimated using the analysis technique based on so-called extrinsic information transfer (EXIT) charts. This approach provides a possibility to predict the bit-error rate (BER) of a turbo code system with only the extrinsic information transfer chart. It is shown that extrinsic information transfer charts are powerful tools to analyze and optimize the convergence behavior of iterative systems utilizing the turbo principle, i.e., systems exchanging and refining extrinsic information. The idea is to consider the associated soft-input soft-output (SISO) stages as information processors, which map input a priori log likelihood ratios (LLRs) onto output extrinsic LLRs, the information content being obviously assumed to increase from input to output, and introduce them to the design of turbo systems without the reliance on extensive simulation. Compared with the other methods for generating extrinsic information transfer functions, the suggested approach provides insight into the iterative behavior of linear turbo systems with substantial reduction in numerical complexity.
  • IoT- and Big Data-Driven Data Analysis Services for Third Parties, Strategic Implications and Business Opportunities

    Lokshina, Izabella V.; Lanting, Cees J. M.; Durkin, Barbara J. (IGI Global, 2018)
    This article describes ubiquitous sensing devices, enabled by wireless sensor network (WSN) technologies, now cut across every area of modern day living, affecting individuals and businesses and offering the ability to obtain and measure environmental indicators. Proliferation of these devices in a communicating-actuating network creates an Internet of Things (IoT). The IoT provides the tools to establish a major, global data-driven ecosystem that also enables Big Data techniques to be used. New business models may focus on the provision of services, i.e., the Internet of Services (IoS). These models assume the presence and development of the necessary IoT measurement and control instruments, communications infrastructure, and easy access to the data collected and information generated. Different business models may support opportunities to create revenue and value for various types of customers. This article contributes to the literature by considering, a first, knowledge-based management practices, business models, strategic implications and business opportunities for third-party data analysis services.
  • Advanced Models and Algorithms for Self–Similar IP Network Traffic Simulation and Performance Analysis

    Radev, Dimitar; Lokshina, Izabella V. (FEI STU Bratislava, 2010)
    The paper examines self-similar (or fractal) properties of real communication network traffic data over a wide range of time scales. These self-similar properties are very different from the properties of traditional models based on Poisson and Markov-modulated Poisson processes. Advanced fractal models of sequentional generators and fixed-length sequence generators, and efficient algorithms that are used to simulate self-similar behavior of IP network traffic data are developed and applied. Numerical examples are provided; and simulation results are obtained and analyzed.
  • Study on Estimating Buffer Overflow Probabilities in High-Speed Communication Networks

    Lokshina, Izabella V. (River Publishers, 2015)
    The paper recommends new methods to estimate effectively the probabilities of buffer overflow in high-speed communication networks. The frequency of buffer overflow in queuing system is very small; therefore the overflow is defined as rare event and can be estimated using rare event simulation with continuous-time Markov chains. First, a two-node queuing system is considered and the buffer overflow at the second node is studied. Two efficient rare event simulation algorithms, based on the Importance sampling and Cross-entropy methods, are developed and applied to accelerate the buffer overflow simulation with Markov chain modeling. Then, the buffer overflow in self-similar queuing system is studied and the simulations with long-range dependent self-similar traffic source models are conducted. A new efficient simulation algorithm, based on the RESTART method with limited relative error technique, is developed and applied to accelerate the buffer overflow simulation with SSM/M/1/B modeling using different parameters of arrival processes and different buffer sizes. Numerical examples and simulation results are provided for all methods to estimate the probabilities of buffer overflow, proposed in this paper.
  • Presentation of The Art of Literary Biography: Orion on the Dunes

    Payne, Daniel G. (2022-03)
    Dr. Daniel G. Payne, Distinguished Teaching Professor (Department of English) lectures on the Art of Literary Biography, drawing from Orion on the Dunes (2016), his acclaimed biography of the 20th Century American nature writer Henry Beston (1888-1968). In addition to providing an overview of Beston’s life and work, Dr. Payne discusses the methods and challenges of writing a literary biography, including stories about his own experiences as a "literary detective."
  • Non-Cognitive Skills in US and Kenyan Mathematics Curriculum

    Kamina, Penina (2021)
    Is mathematics taught in one country different from another one? How do concepts such as division, multiplication or facts like pi or mathematical conventions such PEMDAS/BODMAS compare from one country to another? True that mathematical content is the same regardless of the global location. The context and method used to present the concepts may vary from one place to another but the idea and notion stays the same. Aside from content, there are other learning found in mathematics classrooms that are not cognitive-oriented but very crucial and fundamental in preparing students to thrive as citizens of their nation and beyond. This presentation highlights the non-cognitive skill sets or soft skills, found in the US and in Kenyan math curricula—talk describes the attributes of the soft skills found in both countries as well as compares and contrasts these curricula. Presently, Kenya is on its fifth year of implementing competency-based curriculum where one of its main foci is on building capacity in communication and collaboration, self-efficacy, critical thinking and problem solving, creativity and imagination, citizenship, digital literacy, and learning to learn. The discussion explores how these seven non-content based core competencies look like in mathematics classrooms plus their implications in education. On the other hand, currently several US States have adapted the Common Core mathematics, which has two types of standards; that is, the mathematical content standards and standards for mathematical practice (SMP). The SMP are soft skills and core practices that Pre-K up to grade 12 students must be well versed in by the time they move to tertiary education. There are eight SMPs, which the presentation will focus on. The SMPs include: make sense of problems and persevere in solving them; reason abstractly and quantitatively; construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others; model with mathematics; use appropriate tools strategically; attend to precision; look for and make use of structure and look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning. The presentation shades light on these important soft skills, by making them more explicit. Note that the non-cognitive skillsets embedded in math classrooms carries more significant weight of learning; way much more than mere memorizing of procedural routine of finding an answer to a math problem. For instance, the aftermath of solving a math problem to its end to a solution set, is crucial since the ensuing attributes of endurance, determination and resiliency are examples of non-cognitive skill sets that will carry one outside the mathematics classroom, or in problem solving real life opportunities and challenges or in service to a country.
  • Surviving Through Your SCARs: Humanistic Strategies for a World Gone Wild

    Green, Michael (2021)
    The aim of this work is to answer two questions: According to the humanities, what kind of world do we inhabit, and what strategies can the humanities provide for surviving and thriving in this world? We inhabit a world of volatility, uncertainty, complexity, and ambiguity, which in our current situation manifests itself in international instability due to the decline of Western empires, social instability due to racial conflicts, financial instability due to an unstable currency, and economic instability due to the transition into the Fourth Industrial Revolution. Such volatility creates emotional scars, and the humanistic strategies for managing these scars are Self-Reliance, Creative Problem Solving, Adaptability, and Resilience (SCARs).
  • What Is the SUNY Oneonta Faculty Fellows Program?

    Aucoin, Brendan; Bishop, Jacqueline S. (Bruscella); Fall, Leigh; Montoya, Maria (2021)
    The Faculty Fellows (previously called Administrative Fellows) Program is a pilot program in Academic Affairs that addresses faculty leadership, institutional needs, and collaboration. It provides professional development opportunities for those who are considering administrative roles, by developing focused projects. The projects are addressing SUNY Oneonta’s mission critical goals in experiential learning, student engagement and retention, and inclusivity/diversity. The faculty fellows are an interdisciplinary team that strengthen the roles and offices of the academic deans and library director by integrating the academic schools/units. The 2021-2022 cohort includes Brendan Aucoin (Milne Library), Jacqueline (Bruscella) Bishop (Communication and Media), Leigh M. Fall (Earth and Atmospheric Sciences), and Maria Cristina Montoya (Foreign Languages and Literatures). Brendan is working on a series of projects related to highlighting SUNY Oneonta research and scholarship in the Milne Library. Among these are the development of the Library Special Researcher program for students and creating more opportunities to showcase faculty scholarship in the library. Jackie is working on a series of interrelated initiatives centered on experiential learning. Through cross-campus collaborations. Jackie's project seeks to a) increase access to on-campus and local internship opportunities, b) improve student, faculty, and site-supervisor understanding and use of Handshake, and c) strengthen career readiness programming for students, particularly those studying in the liberal arts. Leigh is working on two projects for the School of Sciences. One project is researching mechanisms of how interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary courses and research happens within the school, highlighting potential barriers and opportunities. The other project is researching past and current STEM experiential learning opportunities to help faculty provide productive experiences for students. MC is working on three projects: first the internationalization of the School of EHESS, including a focus on Collaborative Online International Learning (COIL) as a platform; second, developing the curricula and partnerships for the Bilingual Education graduate program; third, diverse faculty retention.

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