• The effect of dialogic reading on second language acquisition, output, and literacy of migrant students in early childhood

      Barrow, Jasmine (State University of New York College at Fredonia, 2018-05)
      This mixed research study addressed the research question: does dialogic reading influence migrant students' language output and literacy skills? The study was based in Western New York (WNY) and was conducted in an agriculture-based migrant center. The participants of the study were 4 years of age and were both female and male. The current literature indicated that the use of comprehensible input is beneficial to the language output of English language learners (ELLs) in both the home language and the target language. The data was collected through a series of interviews and observations using anecdotal notes and an interview protocol. The compiled data was analyzed and reported through themes and visual graphs which indicated that there was a positive correlation between the use of dialogic reading and the increased output of the target language, English. [from author's abstract]
    • Response to intervention implemented with English language learners

      Forcucci, Kristen (State University of New York College at Fredonia, 2016)
      In the past decade, Response to Intervention (RTI) has been adopted by many states and districts as a prereferral for special education. The purpose of RTI is to appropriately identify students who need special education services by intervening and providing extra support with the goal of students progressing back to grade level. There is little research on what benefits the use of RTI can have with English Language Learners (ELLs), but Vaughn, Mathes,Linan-Thompson, and Francis (2005) associate the lack of research to the fact that there has been no consideration that RTI programs "effectiveness" has only been studied with monolingual English speakers. The purpose of this study is to gain more information and understanding about Response to Intervention (RTI) and its use with ELLs. This study will expand on previous studies of RTI used with native English speakers and ELLs. Specifically, this study focuses on teacher perception of two RTI programs: Corrective Reading and Scientific Learning and if they provide any benefits or concerns to ELLs through semi-structured interviews. In addition, the study uses a checklist to analyze the linguistic complexity of both programs. Results indicated that almost all teachers believed one or both programs were beneficial to ELL learning. Research also found that the various levels of Corrective Reading and Scientific Learning programs could be used with ELLs throughout the levels of language acquisition. [from author's abstract]