• Creating effective homework policies in the secondary mathematics classroom.

      Johnston, Eric M. (2013-01-15)
      There has always been a great debate about whether or not homework is really needed in the classroom. Homework policies over the past 100 years have changed drastically. There is a constant battle between advocates for and opponents of homework. Together, they have created a list of positive and negative effects of homework. A review of the literature helps determine what the ideal homework policy would be in order to encourage higher student achievement, and minimize the negative impacts of homework. How do in service teachers' policies stand up against research based policies? Interviews with rural New York State teachers have determined the core components of a homework policy that most teachers have. Some not-so-common policies and researchers' key points to include in a homework policy have also been included. Homework is indeed effective, especially when it is based on research and contains the core components of an effective homework policy in the secondary mathematics classroom.
    • The effects of Three Jars and Mystery motivators on homework completion and accuracy in a 2nd grade classroom.

      Kestner, Christina (12/11/2013)
      Homework is a strategy used by teachers to promote the understanding of content and student mastery through practice. Academic benefits of homework include retention of new knowledge and better understanding of class material. Homework completion and accuracy are essential for student success in school. However, research shows students may lack self discipline and the academic skills required to complete homework assignments (Rathvon, 1999). Therefore, classroom teachers need effective, efficient and socially acceptable interventions to improve homework performance among their students. The present study examined the effects of the three jars intervention on homework completion and accuracy in a 2nd grade general education classroom. The three jars game produced immediate and noticeable improvements in pupils' completion and accuracy over teacher-led instruction. Pupils rated intervention goals, procedures, and outcomes quite favorably and the teachers found it to be effective and efficient. Implications for future research and practice are discussed.
    • Increasing homework completion and accuracy among mathematics students using the Jars Game.

      Hargis, Debra Zibreg (11/12/2012)
      Homework is a teaching strategy used in mathematics to promote student mastery of new material through practice. In addition, homework completion and accuracy has a positive effect on academic achievement (Madaus, Kehle, Madaus, & Bray, 2003). Unfortunately, the literature also suggests that many students fail to complete homework and many others fail to do so at appropriate levels of success. As such, classroom teachers are in need of effective, efficient, and socially acceptable interventions that can improve the homework-related performance of all their students. The present study examined the effects of the jars intervention, a combination of interdependent and dependent group contingencies with randomized behaviors, criteria, and rewards, on the homework completion and accuracy of an 8th grade math class. The jars game produced immediately and educationally important improvements in all students’ completion and accuracy rates and replicated these effects across subsequent experimental phases. Teachers and pupils rated intervention goals, procedures, and outcomes quite favorably. Implications for future research and practice are discussed.
    • Teachers' perceptions of a Positive Behavior Intervention Support Program at a small rural school.

      Brushaber-Goulding, Melanie (2015)
      This study focuses on Positive Behavior Intervention Support (PBIS) and a particular implementation at a rural school district in Western New York. This study explores teachers’ perceptions of the PBIS system being implemented in the district. It focuses on time spent on PBIS duties, teachers’ opinions of the current implementation, and teachers’ views of changes in behavior due to the PBIS system. The participants in this survey were all faculty and staff at the school district, which includes grades pre-kindergarten through grade twelve, and support staff including specialty areas area teachers. The findings show teacher buy-in to the program, and opinions of success of the PBIS system.