• Citation Behavior of Undergraduate Students: A Study of History, Political Science and Sociology Papers

      Hendley, Michelle (Taylor & Francis Online, 2012-08)
      The goal of this analysis was to obtain local citation behavior data on undergraduates researching history, political science, and sociology papers. The study found that students cited books and journals even with the availability of web sources; however, usage varied by subject. References to specific websites' domains also varied across subject area. Most of the top journal titles that students referenced were online and locally owned. Students cited a broader range of journal titles than predicted by the Law of Scattering and cited titles across a wide array of subject areas. This data helped identify potential gaps in the library's collection and services.
    • Understanding the Language of Information Literacy

      Orgeron, Jean-Paul (Elsevier, 2018-01)
      Understanding the language of information literacy is necessary for the effective use of library resources. The results of a recent study indicate that undergraduate students lack such an understanding, and the authors recommend that librarians, working with faculty, reassess information literacy terms. This article examines what is involved in reassessing these terms by drawing on several ideas from the philosophy of language, which provides a foundation for grasping the semantic challenges librarians face in educating users. Any reassessment of information literacy terms should recognize their ordinary and specialized use and aim for the holistic expression of core concepts, however complex they may be.
    • “The Carrels are Essential”: An Investigation of Faculty Study Spaces at a Mid-Size State College

      Hendley, Michelle (Elsevier, 2019-01)
      Are dedicated study spaces for faculty still essential in academic libraries in the digital age? The results of a survey of faculty who use the library’s locked study carrels at a state college suggest two important discoveries. First, faculty continue to desire these spaces. Second, these spaces appear to facilitate faculty research. The college is a mid-size, liberal arts and sciences state institution located in rural New York State.
    • Discovering data discrepancies during deselection: a study of GreenGlass, Aleph, and due date slips circulation data

      Hendley, Michelle (Taylor & Francis Online, 2019-07)
      Amid a weeding project, librarians at a state college suspected GreenGlass’s circulation data was inaccurate. This study compared GreenGlass’s and Aleph’s circulation statistics for a random sample of books. It also determined if GreenGlass’s list of books with zero uses included curriculum related works using keyword searching. The study compared GreenGlass’s and due date slips’ circulation data for curriculum related titles. Some GreenGlass circulation data was erroneous. Additionally, curriculum related books that circulated were on GreenGlass’s zero use list. The study’s results helped retain pertinent titles and highlighted the inadequacy of relying exclusively on circulation data to weed monographs.
    • The Darkest Themes: Perceptions of Teen-on-Teen Gun Violence in Schools as Portrayed in Teen Literature

      VanSlyke-Briggs, Kjersti; Rhodes, Sarah; Turner, Jenna (Young Adult Library Services Association, 2020)
      This qualitative study examines the perceptions of librarians and teachers on the use of teen literature (also known as young adult literature [YAL] or adolescent literature in education scholarship) that portrays school shootings with teens. The researchers conducted both focus group interviews and an online Qualtrics survey to collect data, as well as group discussions from an online class for education graduate students on teen literature with school shootings as central to the plot. Both professional populations investigated supported the use of this literature with teens but lacked direct experience using literature with this subject matter and voiced a hesitancy in knowing where to begin in the selection of texts and planning for implementation.
    • A Partnership in the Resurrection and Ascension of an Open Access Journal through SUNY Create

      Jensen, Jennifer; Fall, Leigh; Brunstad, Keith; Beck, Ed (2021)
      New partnerships and technologies are creating opportunities for faculty to develop and share open access journals and other digital scholarship at SUNY Oneonta. Our college is investing in open resources in multiple ways, including by opening a new faculty librarian position in 2020 to support and extend open access and scholarly communications services on campus. At the same time, the SUNY system has elevated SUNY Create from a campus-level project (born at SUNY Oneonta and three other comprehensive colleges) to a system-wide platform for faculty and students to build their own open-source, web-enabled teaching, learning, and research materials in a supported environment. Two faculty members from the Earth and Atmospheric Sciences department are unearthing the potential of SUNY Create by reviving Northeast Geoscience, a regional open access journal with a history on our campus. In partnership with Milne Library’s Scholarly Communications Librarian and an Instructional Designer from the Teaching, Learning, and Technology Center (TLTC), we are developing an open access journal site to host, manage, and display a newly accessible version of Northeast Geoscience journal.
    • Faculty Publications in the Alden Room: The Alden Scholar Series

      Wienke, Lori; Stalter, Heather; Rhodes, Sarah; Hendley, Michelle; Dourlaris, Christie; Bensen, Mary Lynn (2021)
      One of the many treasures of the Alden Room in Milne Library is the Faculty Publications Collection. In this collection are books on various subjects written by faculty, professional staff, and administrative staff over the course of the College’s history since its foundation in 1889 as the Oneonta Normal School.
    • Milne Library as Scholarly Partner

      Aucoin, Brendan; Stewart, Karen (2021)
      During fall semester 2021, Brendan Aucoin (Milne Library) and Karen Stewart (Communication and Media) collaborated to present Leap of Faith, an applied-learning video game project, to the campus community. The game's opening reception and month-long installation at Milne Library served as a means for displaying creative faculty scholarship publicly, and as an opportunity for the library to partner with faculty scholars in new and exciting ways. In this presentation, Brendan and Karen discuss the ways the library acted as a scholarly collaborator, including the repurposing of a storage room as a display space for scholarship, library support in furthering the development of the game, and library resources curated to support game studies at SUNY Oneonta.
    • SUNY Oneonta Textbook Survey: Undergraduate Students’ Preferences and Behaviors on the Use of Textbooks and Course Materials

      Beck, Ed; Jensen, Jennifer; Strauss, Jade; Cordice-Little, Britney (2021)
      Textbooks represent the fastest growing price tag for college students among many rising college expenses. In addition, the market for course materials has become more complicated with the rise of rentals, digital textbooks, online homework systems, and a diverse world of vendors from which to choose. This poster describes the results of a student-led survey about undergraduate students’ preferences and behaviors related to the attainment and use of textbooks and course materials. The survey asked how SUNY Oneonta students are experiencing the impact of rising textbook costs and increasingly complicated decisions. We explore how those results can inform our campus Open Educational Resources (OER) Initiative and other SUNY student success programs.
    • What Is the SUNY Oneonta Faculty Fellows Program?

      Aucoin, Brendan; Bishop, Jacqueline S. (Bruscella); Fall, Leigh; Montoya, Maria (2021)
      The Faculty Fellows (previously called Administrative Fellows) Program is a pilot program in Academic Affairs that addresses faculty leadership, institutional needs, and collaboration. It provides professional development opportunities for those who are considering administrative roles, by developing focused projects. The projects are addressing SUNY Oneonta’s mission critical goals in experiential learning, student engagement and retention, and inclusivity/diversity. The faculty fellows are an interdisciplinary team that strengthen the roles and offices of the academic deans and library director by integrating the academic schools/units. The 2021-2022 cohort includes Brendan Aucoin (Milne Library), Jacqueline (Bruscella) Bishop (Communication and Media), Leigh M. Fall (Earth and Atmospheric Sciences), and Maria Cristina Montoya (Foreign Languages and Literatures). Brendan is working on a series of projects related to highlighting SUNY Oneonta research and scholarship in the Milne Library. Among these are the development of the Library Special Researcher program for students and creating more opportunities to showcase faculty scholarship in the library. Jackie is working on a series of interrelated initiatives centered on experiential learning. Through cross-campus collaborations. Jackie's project seeks to a) increase access to on-campus and local internship opportunities, b) improve student, faculty, and site-supervisor understanding and use of Handshake, and c) strengthen career readiness programming for students, particularly those studying in the liberal arts. Leigh is working on two projects for the School of Sciences. One project is researching mechanisms of how interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary courses and research happens within the school, highlighting potential barriers and opportunities. The other project is researching past and current STEM experiential learning opportunities to help faculty provide productive experiences for students. MC is working on three projects: first the internationalization of the School of EHESS, including a focus on Collaborative Online International Learning (COIL) as a platform; second, developing the curricula and partnerships for the Bilingual Education graduate program; third, diverse faculty retention.
    • Is it Happening to You? Workplace Bullying, Mobbing, and other Forms of Workplace Psychological Abuse are More Prevalent than you Think!

      Stalter, Heather (2021)
      Self-censorship, mistrust, loss of morale, resentment, isolation, burnout, headaches, hair loss, sleep problems, eating disorders, stomach ulcers, coronary heart disease, chronic health conditions, panic attacks, anxiety, clinical depression, PDSD, suicidal ideation. These are not things one hopes for when earning a living; however, they can be just a few of the very real consequences of workplace psychological abuse. Despite the plethora of documented evidence of the long-lasting damage done to targets, witnesses, and organizations, workplace psychological abuse, in any of its manifestations, is prevalent and pervasive in many workplaces, including on college campuses. Since its launch on September 27, 2021, the library guide Resources on Bullying, Mobbing, and Other Forms of Workplace Psychological Violence has received 196 views, indicating that the topic is of considerable interest on this campus. The guide and my presentation are inspired by an extensive literature review, my own personal experiences with mobbing, a desire to help others, and a strong determination to encourage awareness in everyone.