The James M. Milne Library, named for the first principal of the Oneonta Normal School, supports the college’s mission by providing resources and services to meet the academic and technology needs of its students and faculty. This collection hosts the scholarly materials produced by the librarians.

Collections in this community

Recent Submissions

  • Citation Behavior of Undergraduate Students: A Study of History, Political Science and Sociology Papers

    Hendley, Michelle (Taylor & Francis Online, 2012-08)
    The goal of this analysis was to obtain local citation behavior data on undergraduates researching history, political science, and sociology papers. The study found that students cited books and journals even with the availability of web sources; however, usage varied by subject. References to specific websites' domains also varied across subject area. Most of the top journal titles that students referenced were online and locally owned. Students cited a broader range of journal titles than predicted by the Law of Scattering and cited titles across a wide array of subject areas. This data helped identify potential gaps in the library's collection and services.
  • “The Carrels are Essential”: An Investigation of Faculty Study Spaces at a Mid-Size State College

    Hendley, Michelle (Elsevier, 2019-01)
    Are dedicated study spaces for faculty still essential in academic libraries in the digital age? The results of a survey of faculty who use the library’s locked study carrels at a state college suggest two important discoveries. First, faculty continue to desire these spaces. Second, these spaces appear to facilitate faculty research. The college is a mid-size, liberal arts and sciences state institution located in rural New York State.
  • Discovering data discrepancies during deselection: a study of GreenGlass, Aleph, and due date slips circulation data

    Hendley, Michelle (Taylor & Francis Online, 2019-07)
    Amid a weeding project, librarians at a state college suspected GreenGlass’s circulation data was inaccurate. This study compared GreenGlass’s and Aleph’s circulation statistics for a random sample of books. It also determined if GreenGlass’s list of books with zero uses included curriculum related works using keyword searching. The study compared GreenGlass’s and due date slips’ circulation data for curriculum related titles. Some GreenGlass circulation data was erroneous. Additionally, curriculum related books that circulated were on GreenGlass’s zero use list. The study’s results helped retain pertinent titles and highlighted the inadequacy of relying exclusively on circulation data to weed monographs.