The SUNY Oneonta School of Liberal Arts offers exceptional learning opportunities across a diverse range of disciplines, from English and philosophy to art and theatre. This collection represents scholarly articles and creative works from the faculty, staff, and students of the departments of Africana and Latinx Studies, Art, Communication and Media, English, Foreign Languages and Literatures, History, Music, Philosophy, Political Science, Theater, and Women's and Gender Studies.

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  • Freedom Courts: An Analysis of Black Women’s Divorce in Attala County During Mississippi’s Anti-Divorce Campaign, 1890–1940

    Ashford, Evan Howard (University of BolognaInter-university Consortium for the Study of Euro-American History and Politics (CISPEA), 2021-03)
    The essay argues that divorce, as a legal maneuver, provided Black women with the opportunity tochallenge oppression within the household while simultaneously pushing back against broader ef-forts to curtail access to divorce. Framed within the New Negro Era, the article analyzes the compet-ing realities of divorce as both a racialized political issue and an internal struggle for independence.Utilizing newspapers and divorce petitions, the article captures how divorce gave Black women avoice and a platform in which they could declare independence in a society that was historicallyknown for its suppression of African Americans.
  • Doublespeak: Louisa Jacobs, the American Equal Rights Association, and Complicating Racism in the Early US Women’s Suffrage Movement

    Goodier, Susan (Cornell Press, 2021)
    Members of the U.S. women’s suffrage movement, usually noted as being from the 1840s to the Nineteenth Amendment in 1920, faced many struggles related to race from the outset. Periods of close collaboration between Black and white activists have been punctuated by longer periods with virtually no cooperation between them. Turning our attention to Lou- isa Jacobs, the daughter of the once-enslaved Harriet Jacobs (author of Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl), helps us unpack racial cooperation—and the lack thereof—in the years immediately following the Civil War.
  • The Dutch Atlantic world, 1585–1815: Recent themes and developments in the field

    Noorlander, Danny (Wiley, 2020-08)
    Scholarship on the Dutch Atlantic has grown and changed a lot in 30 years, with older themes like colonial weakness and insignificance giving way to a newly discovered Dutch vitality. This essay demonstrates the change by summarizing the recent research and highlighting the military, economic, and cultural impact of the Dutch in West Africa and America, plus the possible impacts of both places on the Dutch in Europe. The essay also cautions writers against taking arguments about dynamism, diversity, tolerance, cosmopolitanism, and modernity too far.