• Information Design and Technology

      Ossowski, Candice (2004-05-01)
      This case study analyzes the effects of transforming a static HTML-based website into a dynamic database-driven one. As part of the study, a small computer company’s static website was redesigned, making it dynamic and database-driven. The theory of Human-Centered Design is applied to a real-world situation and the nine human-centered characteristics are analyzed as they relate to static and dynamic websites
    • Adoption of the Smart Cart: An Instructional Technology

      Gillander, Peter (2004-05-01)
      The intention of this study is to discover and understand how Instructional Technology is adopted into the classroom. The study also determined what is needed to meet the goals intended for it. The Rome City School District, located in central New York, conducted the Smart Cart pilot program. The research consisted mainly of interviews and observations. The planning and implementation of this pilot program were studied to understand how the adoption of the Smart Cart occurred. These findings were applied to the theories of Human Centered Design and Change. Findings included the identification of barriers to the adoption process, and the needs for meeting the pilot’s goals. Barriers found consisted of breakdowns in planning and communication, and the need for more adequate training. It was also found that the technology was capable of meeting the intended pilot’s goals, but will be more successful when the barriers are addressed.
    • Nursing Home Website Review: Are they accessible, usable, and do they meet consumer needs?

      Warchol, Gail (2005-05-01)
      This study addresses a two-part research question: Are nursing home websites easily accessible and used and do they offer enough information for consumers to make informed choices? Research indicated that generally, hospital discharge planners are the ones who initially explain nursing homes to their patients with brochures and other hard copy information. Some consumers, (generally family members of the patients) have visited nursing home websites. A review of nursing home websites found that nursing home guide sites are often used for giving an array of information, including state survey results, quality assurance, staff ratio, and occupancy rates. The internet users who were interviewed stated that nursing home websites are often difficult to locate. Once having found the sites, interviewees ranked resident rights information as being most interesting, especially information on choice-making and how they are treated once in the nursing home.
    • The Hybrid Course Experience

      Thompson, Jonathan M (2005-05-01)
      This phenomenology analyzes the experience of students and teachers in hybrid (blended) courses in a community college and a university located in central New York.The Constructivist Learning Theory is applied to the hybrid course characteristics and analyzed to determine the effectiveness of hybrid courses. A definition and description of hybrid courses is proposed.
    • How is GIS used in a Community College Setting for Architectural Identification

      Judycki, Brian (2005-05-01)
      This case study analyzes how students use an Architectural Identification GIS Application in a community college setting.
    • The Process of Redesigning and Redeveloping a University Website in the Face of Organizational Change

      Rau, Erika E (2005-05-01)
      This case study analyzes the process of redesigning and redeveloping a university website. An in-depth exploration of decision-making processes, organizational structure, working relationships, communication during change, and the impact these issues have on the process during the beginning stages of the website redesign is examined. Brenda Dervin’s SenseMaking theory is applied and was the key theory that led the research. Tushman and Nadler’s Information Processing theory and Daft and Lengel’s Information Processing and Organizational Design theory was also analyzed and related to this redesign process.
    • The Impact of Staff Development on Middle School Technology Integration

      Scalisi, Regina (2005-05-01)
      This case study describes the impact of technology staff development in two Central New York Middle Schools. The staff development program was implemented under the federally funded Enhancing Education Through Technology grant. Teachers and students were studied during a seven-month period as they learned to effectively use computers, Internet resources and available software with their curricula and instruction. The conditions of Change Theory were applied to the study as they relate to the adoption of technology integration.
    • Discovering the meaning of Internet Safety

      Palinski, Kathleen (2005-12-01)
      An in-depth analysis was conducted with the purpose of discovering the meaning of Internet safety. A case study was used to derive themes from multiple sources of data (documents, interviews, observations, artifacts). Data collected during the study includes interviews from elementary teachers, parents, students, and district-level administrators. It also includes a literature review, documents, and the application of Karl Weick’s Organizational Theory. Internet safety problems were studied at a small school district of approximately 2,500 students in central New York State where the case study was conducted. The current software the district uses is a highly restrictive server level program. A dynamic definition of Internet safety is proposed as a result of the case study.
    • The Influence of College Web Sites on the College Selection Process

      Basi Raab, Maryrose (2005-12-01)
      This case study examines the use and influence of college web sites by high school seniors as they move through the college selection process through interviews, directed observations, and focus groups. It discovers and describes the different ways that web sites are used by this bounded group. As a part of the study, the re-designed web site at SUNY Institute of Technology is critiqued and analyzed by respondents. Enhancements are proposed based on the research to increase the effectiveness of the site in its appeal to prospective high school students. The theories of Human-Centered Design and Contextual Design are described and applied to this case study.
    • The Use of Multimedia Math Lessons to Establish a Learning Community

      Blenis, Joanne (2006-05-01)
      This case study illustrates the process by which one school district will implement multimedia lessons in the math classroom to establish a learning community. Key employees of the district were interviewed and students in grade six math classes were shown a lesson and then asked to answer a survey. The theories of Human-Centered Design and Constructivism were applied and characteristics of each were analyzed as they relate to the multimedia lessons.
    • How Can a University Approach the Construction of a Blog Space For Use as a Recruiting Tool?

      Washburn, Teresa M.R. (2006-08-01)
      This case study examines the social construction of a blog space to recruit prospective students. The blog space initially created by SUNYIT is examined and compared with other existing blog spaces at accredited universities in New York State. The research in this case study is based on web site observations, interviews, questionnaires, review of literature and an information session. The theory of sensemaking and organizational culture (participatory culture, specifically) are applied to help understand the case and context.
    • Laptop’s In Education – Hype or Help?

      Cronn, Patrick (2006-12-01)
      This study examines the impact of introducing a laptop program for educational teaching in the classroom. By interviewing experts in the field, teachers, administrators, and students at a college level, a phenomenology was completed on the impact of laptops in pedagogy. These ideals were then applied to the Human-Centered Design Theory. “It was not until twenty years ago that serious progress was achieved in applying the available computer and internet technology to support teaching and learning in schools and institutions of higher education. The technology that was previously only available to large corporations and organizations began to be available in homes, schools and universities. This new shift in technology application has provided both students and educators many new advantages and learning possibilities (Altalib, 4).” The numerous ways in which professors and their students interact has always been a critical issue in higher educational institutes. With the increase in technological enhancements over the past several years, study is needed on how collaboration between faculty and students advance.
    • Presentation of Self in MySpace.com an Online Social Networking Site

      Perretta, Heather (2007-05-01)
      This ethnographic study explores the presentation of self on MySpace.com, an online social networking website. One hundred MySpace.com profile pages were analyzed to discover how users complete and manipulate the MySpace template to create a virtual presentation of self. The one hundred profile pages represented fifty stated female users and fifty stated male users. Each page was archived and coded based on the elements present that were viewable by the public. All users were selected at random using the website search tool and a random number generator. The work of Erving Goffman in his 1959 book, The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life, is the theoretical foundation for the this study. Analysis of the profile pages sampled indicates that most users studied modify the default template and add various elements from textual information to pictures, music, and video clips to the profile pages and create a virtual presentation of self on MySpace.com.
    • Knowledge Documentation - From Text to Graphics: Can this improve help desk knowledge transfer?

      Gage, Teresa J. (2007-08-01)
      This thesis was designed to find out if graphics could improve help desk knowledge transfer. Four Web prototype presentation styles were analyzed via the Delphi Method (Michalski 2003) utilizing a panel of experts. The elements tested included the use of text and increasing amounts of graphics presented with different navigation systems. The results proved that graphics could improve knowledge transfer but that a combination of text and graphic may be more effective in a team-centric solution to help desk knowledge transfer.
    • Participant Interaction and Social Exchange-Centered Design in Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Games: A Qualitative Study of Furcadia

      Scialdone, Michael J (2007-08-01)
      The purpose of this ethnography is to understand participant interaction in a Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Game (MMORPGs). As participation and action of users are the glue of any community, it is imperative to examine how and why people congregate in graphical virtual environments. This relatively new phenomenon is studied within both existing and emerging schools of social thought. In this paper, the question is asked: how do participants interact within the context of an MMORPG, and are they encouraged to do so? This question is answered through an ethnographic study of one such MMORPG entitled Furcadia. This study applies both Human-Centered Design (to answer the how), and Social Exchange Theory (to answer the why). It is asserted that MMORPGs can be explained through a marrying of theories into a new one entitled Social Exchange-Centered Design.
    • How Colleges Have Responded to Changes In Student Recruitment as Defined By Their Level of Web Definition on Their Official College Web Sites

      Ayouch, Karen (2007-08-01)
      Increased competition amongst colleges, advances in technology and the changing wants and needs of the target market has influenced colleges to expand their marketing techniques globally through the use of the World Wide Web. One hundred randomly selected college websites were analyzed for specific criteria found on the main page or any page that can be accessed from the main page. Demographic information was also collected about the colleges to look for potential trends in the level of web definition. The level was web definition was defined by specified criteria in the areas of technology implementation, interactivity and marketing concepts. The findings show that the area of marketing had the greatest number of colleges assigned to the medium-high level of web definition for both potential and actual number of points assigned and the area interactivity had the greatest number of colleges assigned to the low-medium level of web definition.
    • University Class Using Podcasting in Teaching

      Sun, Tianren (2008-11-01)
      'Podcast' has been declared Word of the Year 2005 by editors of the New Oxford American Dictionary, reported the BBS News in 2005. As a method of publishing audio files (usually MP3) to the web, which are then made available through subscription and automatically downloaded to a personal computer or an ipod, podcasting is a hot and modern web service belonging to the Web2.0 revolution, which has gained popularity with people all over the world over the past two years. One obvious application of podcasting in an educational context is to create class podcast lectures that students can listen to at their convenience. As podcasting is relatively new, educators everywhere are still exploring its possibilities. My literature review mainly focuses on exploring the value of using podcasting in education, like in class teaching. I will try to find out what podcast or podcasting is, its main applications/possibilities, what's special, podcast users, podcasting technology, podcasting use in classrooms/higher education, problems or podcast issues people are talking about, and its benefits or some trend. In the 'pilot study' I conducted over Spring07 Semester (Jan07-May07), students at the SUNYIT taking classes in Research Methods of Nursing School were surveyed to find out exactly how much they know about podcasting and how they feel about podcast lecture learning. Survey results were then matched against theoretical works to try and find out students' 'level of enthusiasm' about using podcasts in learning. During Fall07 Semester (Aug07Dec07), I also tried to do podcasting projects on three classes: two of them are technical editing classes of IDT program——I assisted with Prof. Kahn to provide students with online podcast lectures, helping them better understand what they learn from the class. And another one is a research method class of Prof.Gina Myers teaching at SUNY Jefferson College. Like we did in the pilot study, I helped with Prof. Myers creating podcasts for her class and tried to get feedback from her students. Survey results were then matched against theoretical works to try and find out students ‘level of enthusiasm’ about using podcasts in learning. In this thesis project report, first an overview of the problem, research objective, procedures, and delivery methods will be addressed. The main focus of this report will be in the related literature review of this issue and the research study carried out during two semesters with their final findings and some data analysis.
    • How Decisions Are Made When Creating Information Design Exhibits for Museums

      Yahnke, David R. (2008-12-01)
      This case study illustrates how and when decisions are made during the creative process occurring within two cultures: Graphic Designers and Museum Exhibitors. This study investigates the pre-visual creative process and fabrication of exhibits concerning the history of farming in Oneida County and the history of New York State during the American Revolutionary War at the Marcus Willet Visitors Center at Fort Stanwix in Rome, NY. This study will apply wayfinding theories to information design practice; the result is a field guide for both graphic and museum designers. This case study explains the nature of decision-making used in creation of information design. The particular project to be studied is the design of a permanent exhibit for a community historical society. Each decision to be made is documented; details are provided regarding what decisions are made, who makes the decisions, when decisions are made, and the many factors that impact the decision-making process. The case study is a description of this particular design process and a guide to the way in which decisions are made in information design. The major decisions concern the audience, content, means of wayfinding, design consistency, color, typographic parameters, size, and viewing distances. This study explores the impact these decisions had on the final exhibition design.
    • Centralized Information Site for IDT Imternational Students

      Sathiaseelan, Akila (2008-12-01)
      This qualitative research study analyzes the outcomes of a centralized information site created for prospective and current international students for Information Design and Technology department. Information specific to International students’ needs were gathered and categorized into major groups. A Flash site was constructed based upon those needs by applying ease of use, maintainability, search-ability and Human Centered Design (HCD) principles. Qualitative researches, namely, Participatory Action Research and Qualitative interviewing were applied for data collection and data analysis to yield the results.
    • Effectiveness of Disseminating the Migrant Clinician’s Reference Manual Online

      Hawkes, Lynae (2009-05-01)
      Migrant and seasonal farmwokers are a socially disadvantaged population, working in the Nation’s most dangerous industry. Due to social isolation, cultural and linguistic barriers, coupled with a hazardous work environment, this population is thought to be at increased risk for work-related health problems. The primary sources of healthcare for farmworkers are federally funded migrant health programs located in highly agricultural areas throughout the United States. However, studies show that healthcare providers are ill-equipped to properly diagnosis and treat this patient population. A clinic resource was developed to meet the needs of those serving farmworkers in the Northeast. This case study evaluates the effectiveness of disseminating this resource on the World Wide Web. The migrant health center environment and prior Internet usage were of particular interest. Application of the Sense Making theory suggests critical gaps exist in the health literacy of migrant and seasonal farmworkers, wherein the migrant health reference manual serves as a bridge between provider and patient. Findings further suggest that the manual has a positive impact on patient care by addressing six focus areas of the Health People 2010 Health Literacy Initiative (USDHHS, 2000, p29): 1) Access to Quality Health Services 2) Arthritis, Osteoporosis, and Chronic Back Conditions 3) Environmental Health 4) Health Communication 5) Occupational Safety and Health 6) Public Health Infrastructure