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dc.contributor.authorCooper, Miranda
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-26T20:47:17Z
dc.date.available2020-10-26T20:47:17Z
dc.date.issued2020-05
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12648/1496
dc.description.abstractStories are powerful because they break the repetitive, circular movements of life. Through both creation and destruction, imagination, and evoking reality, new movements can be created. Through the performativity that exists in David Albahari and Sylvia Plath’s Holocaust art, Götz and Meyer and “Daddy,” authors, and by extension, enactors find a balance between destruction and creation, imagination and evoking reality. This allows both to use the creative process to come to a greater understanding of the human condition within the context of the Holocaust and break the repetitive circular movement of patriarchal violence. The findings from this paper will be used as guideposts in the creation of the performative aspect of my honor’s thesis.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectResearch Subject Categories::HUMANITIES and RELIGION::Aesthetic subjects::Theatreen_US
dc.subjectEnglishen_US
dc.subjectHolocausten_US
dc.subjectDavid Albaharien_US
dc.subjectSylvia Plathen_US
dc.subjectGötz and Meyeren_US
dc.subjectDaddyen_US
dc.titlePerforming history: artistic responses to tragic eventsen_US
dc.typeHonor's Projecten_US
dc.description.versionNAen_US
refterms.dateFOA2020-10-26T20:47:17Z
dc.description.institutionSUNY College at New Paltzen_US
dc.description.departmentHonorsen_US
dc.description.degreelevelN/Aen_US


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