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SUNY Oneonta authors can submit peer-reviewed journal articles, scholarly book reviews, and links to creative works or scholarly presentations with the forms and FAQs available on our Repository Guide. Graduate students should visit the Digital Masters and Culminating Projects guide here.

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  • Virtual Connectedness: Working Together to Create a Companion Site for Spanish Phonetics & Phonology

    Escudero, Alejandra; Carbone, Alyssa; Barreca, Nicole (2021)
    The creation of a resource for students who are struggling or who simply want to practice their skills, that is accessible to all, is crucial, especially during the current times of virtual learning. We have created a companion site for the Spanish Phonetics & Phonology course for all SUNY students to use, as there is no resource of its kind, that is in the target language (Spanish) and is free of cost for all students and faculty. This will be a long-lasting tool that will allow for clarification of concepts, practice with engaging virtual exercises, and many opportunities to exercise skills and learning. After students learn concepts in class, they can access the companion site to further reinforce the comprehension of content, test what they know, see diagrams, practice, and get tips from other students who have already taken the course. We use h5p plugins in order to create different types of interactive activities for students in each module, which enhance the practice and learning experience. Each module in the site follows the same structure: 1) objectives of the module, 2) a short pre-reading quiz, 3) the content of the module, used to review concepts covered in class with examples and diagrams, 4) a “tips from other students” section so that students can learn from other students who already took the course and remember some tricks that will help them when preparing for exams, 5) a section for activities and practice, and 6) a summary of what was covered in the module. Two key resources that have been crucial to the creation of the companion site are Pressbooks and Monday.com. Pressbooks is the site used to create content and interactive activities. Monday.com is a site that allows for task management, progress tracking, making comments, and for student-faculty accountability. This companion site is an Open Educational Resource (OER) and is ADA-compliant, so that all students- regardless of income and potential disability- can access it for free. This resource also falls into the category of Open Pedagogy, with our companion site being one of the few Open Pedagogy projects across the SUNY system, where content is planned and created by students under faculty supervision.
  • There is nothing new under the sun

    Stengler, Erik (Sissa Medialab, 2021-09)
    A novel and original take on the history of popular science showcases that making science accessible to the public has been part of scientific activity since ancient times. Under this lens, and through twenty-one case studies, current trends such as sci-art and virtual technology can be seen as part of a continuum that was already present in the use of aesthetic and rhetorical tools by the ancient Greeks. Thanks to a careful curation of the collection of texts, this volume as a whole offers more than the sum of its parts (chapters).
  • A wormy world: Summer research in fish parasitology at SUNY Oneonta

    Reyda, Florian; Mendez, Gustavo; Curtin, Claire; Whitcomb, Hannah; Fleming, Morgan; Bulmer, Emily; Nielsen, Emma; Reyda, Florian (2021)
    During the summer of 2021 four students – Gustavo Mendez, Hannah Whitcomb, Morgan Fleming and Emily Bulmer – assisted Florian Reyda with a variety of endeavors as part of the fish parasitology research program. Students were involved in both field work and laboratory work. A major focus was a study of the parasites of Oneida Lake fishes here in New York. Oneida Lake was the focus of a set of classic parasitological studies (Van Cleave & Mueller, 1932) that took place nearly 100 years ago. These studies are widely known within the field of fish parasitology (see Scholz & Choudhury, 2014) because they included descriptions of 33 new species of parasitic worms, from a diversity of fish species. Thus, Oneida Lake is the type locality (i.e., original place of discovery) for 33 species of parasitic worms—a truly remarkable number! Reyda and students conducted fish parasite survey of Oneida Lake fishes during the first half of the summer. The overall objective of that survey is to identify how many of the previously discovered 33 species of parasitic worms are still present today. They collected a diversity of fish from one particular stream, Chittenango Creek, but also examined a diversity of fish that were provided by colleagues at the Cornell Biological Field Station. Reyda and students also examined fish samples from Otsego Lake and Moe Pond—two water bodies that are accessible via the SUNY Oneonta Biological Field Station. In August, Reyda and three students traveled to Douglas Lake Michigan in order to sample fish parasites there. The specific objective was to collect two species of thorny-headed worms (acanthocephalans), from their type locality. One of those species, Octospinifer macilentus was the specific focus of one of the students in the lab, Claire Curtin. The survey work was an extra challenge because the main fish of interest, white sucker, were few and far between in the streams, and it took miles of stream walking with a backpack shocker in order to encounter enough white sucker to constitute a decent sample size. We obtained one of the two target species, but unfortunately not the one Claire needed for her project. In addition to field work, during summer students performed fish dissections in the lab and isolated parasites that they then prepared as permanent microscope slides. This aspect of the summer work is very important because it results in a set of study specimens that students can use for independent study projects during the upcoming academic year.
  • Research catches up with the unstoppable reality of science communication through online video

    Stengler, Erik; Sherman, Hannah (Sissa Medialab, 2019-02)
    While online video has become synonymous with web-based searches for the younger generations and the communication of science and technology has jumped on the bandwagon of this trend, too, relatively little research has been undertaken on this phenomenon. Over the last few years a small group of scholars from different institutions have independently begun to explore this field and to discuss their findings at international conferences, as reported previously in Allgaier and Geipel [2016] and in this journal in Stengler [2016]. Some articles have become essential references, such as Welbourne and Grant [2016] and Muñoz Morcillo, Czurda and Robertson-von Trotha [2016]. While there was an e-book published in German on the topic [Körkel and Hoppenhaus, 2016], and an extensive review will also be included in the Second International Handbook of Internet Research [Allgaier, 2020, to appear], the book Communicating Science and Technology Through Online Video edited by Bienvenido León and Michael Bourk is a timely arrival in the academic literature and shows that a critical mass of research in the field is being reached.
  • Child Abuse, Gender, and the Cycle of Violence

    Seale, Elizabeth; Bohart, Katie (2021)
    This study is a secondary data analysis comparing 877 subjects and 877 controls, with specific focus on childhood victimization and adult crime correlations. Subjects were individuals found to have been abused or neglected in caseloads of a large urban county in the Northwest United States for 17 years. Controls were matched to subjects on the basis of socio-economic factors. We find that subjects are more likely to be charged with a violent crime as an adult than are controls. The percentage of subjects who were charged with a violent crime is 8.8%, compared to 0.8% of the control group. The second hypothesis – subjects of emotional, physical, or sexual abuse are more likely to commit violent crime as an adult than are subjects who have only been victims of neglect, or controls – is also supported: 8.7% of subjects who were emotionally, physically, or sexually abused were charged with a violent crime as an adult, compared to 2.9% of the group that was not subject to abuse. The third hypothesis tested is subjects whose abuse was perpetrated by a member of the same gender is more likely to commit a violent crime as an adult than those subjects whose abuse was not perpetrated by the same gender. It should be noted that the differences found by gender are not statistically significant. Implications of this study for understanding the cycle of violence is discussed.
  • Safety First

    Stengler, Erik; Doggette, Carlie (SUNY Oneonta, 2021-05)
    April 19, 1940, 11:30 pm. Doris Cannon was at the Little Falls High School gymnasium, listening to the school dance band “Rhythm Dukes” finish their sold-out gig for the night. Doris and the other students had paid 25 cents to dance at the gym that night. By 11:30, some students had drifted off into the chilly New York night, many trying to get home before their curfew. Doris was still in the gym when at 11:33 she felt the gymnasium shake and heard an explosion. She heard the shouts from several of her classmates “Accident! Accident!” But just what accident had occurred?
  • Preface

    Stengler, Erik (SUNY Oneonta, 2021-05)
    This is the first of many “Cabinets of Curiosities” that students of the Cooperstown Graduate Program will imagine with objects from the collection of the Little Falls Historical Society in Little Falls, NY. As part of the course “Science Cabinet of Curiosities” the students select objects for this imaginary cabinet of curiosities, do in-depth research about them and their role in a specific aspect or period in the history of Little Falls, and then create a product that supports the Historical Society’s Museum and its programming. In 2020, the product has been this book about the industrialization in Little Falls.
  • War and Cheese: A Play

    Stengler, Erik; Zajan, Alyssa G. (SUNY Oneonta, 2021)
    Setting: A park alongside bustling street. A small platform is set up with a podium and small table. A step or small set of steps allows access up onto the platform. The table contains a pile of pamphlets, flyers, various bottles filled with liquids and tablets, a Marshall Rennet Testing Kit and large tin container. Underneath the table is a metal chest. Posters saying, “Meatless Mondays,” “Wheatless Wednesdays,” “Buy Local,” “When in doubt, eat Potatoes” and “Observe the Gospel of the clean plate” line the back of the small platform. At the front of the platform a sign reads “Live Demonstration at 10:00”.
  • Keeping it Safe with the Little Falls Stone Bank

    Stengler, Erik; Lien, Alex (SUNY Oneonta, 2021)
    The Little Falls stone bank building, located at 319 S Ann St., has witnessed the Little Falls community grow for the last two centuries while serving it in multiple ways, building on its story and importance. We tend to learn about the importance of banks at a young age but do not truly understand it until we are older. Banks provide financial stability for the residents of the area by housing our savings, providing checks and debit cards for instant access to our money, and even loan out money for our ambitious projects such as obtaining a house, going to school or starting a business. Now imagine if there was not a bank in your town. In the 19th century, settlements throughout the newly formed United States often did not have established financial institutions like banks. Eventually the American Industrial Revolution sparked an economic boom throughout the country, leading to a need for banks to support our finances and projects. This is why the Little Falls Stone Bank was built in 1833 and begins its service to the Little Falls community over the next two centuries. The building had its ups and downs throughout its history, growing in character as it was used in a variety of ways, from its original use as a bank, to being a simple storage building, to eventually becoming the home and keeper of Little Falls’ history.
  • Toward a Bioarchaeology of Urbanization: Demography, Health, and Behavior in Cities in the Past

    Betsinger, Tracy K.; DeWitte, Sharon N. (Wiley, 2021-02)
    Urbanization is one of the most important settlement shifts in human history and has been the focus of research within bioarchaeology for decades. However, there have been limited attempts to synthesize the results of these studies in order to gain a broader perspective on whether or how urbanization affects the biology, demography, and behavior of humans, and how these potential effects are embodied in the human skeleton. This paper outlines how bioarchaeology is well-suited to examine urbanization in the past, and we provide an overview and examples of three main ways in which urbanization is studied in bioarchaeological research: comparison of (often contemporaneous) urban and rural sites, synchronic studies of the variation that exists within and between urban sites, and investigations of changes that occur within urban sites over time. Studies of urbanization, both within bioarchaeology and in other fields of study, face a number of limitations, including a lack of a consensus regarding what urban and urbanization mean, the assumed dichotomous nature of urban versus rural settlements, the supposition that urbanization is universally bad for people, and the assumption (at least in practice) of homogeneity within urban and rural populations. Bioarchaeologists can address these limitations by utilizing a wide array of data and methods, and the studies described here collectively demonstrate the complex, nuanced, and highly variable effects of urbanization.
  • Fashion Illustration through the Current Times

    Monchaitanapat, Jan (2021)
    My independent study focuses on fashion illustration as a vessel for creating beautiful thought-provoking garments that could be made in the future. There will be two components to my project, the study of diverse types of models, from petite to plus size, dynamic poses, and the use of multiple mediums to produce a unique collection of illustrated wearable art and traditional fashion plates. I will diverge from current fashion illustration by presenting more diverse and inclusive models and designs that spark innovation and inspiration for others. My research will include the influence of social movements, climate changes, and changing times due to current events on fashion trends and emerging new styles from textile innovations as well as recycled materials. I will use accessories, like different functional yet aesthetic masks types, to help enhance the visual experience of the illustrations that reflect our current “new normal.” I will be conducting research and applying the advance technical components of fashion illustration such as fashion design principles, illustration layouts and using a variety of mediums to mimic fabric drapery and textures. My study will be reflected in mood boards, references, and swatches along with the final fashion portfolio photographed for virtual review. My goal for the end of the project is to use these illustrations as a representation of my personality as well as my design aesthetic to further my fashion portfolio.
  • Groovy Outfitters: Modern Clothing for Old Souls, Fall/Winter 2021 Collection

    Portway, Sarah; Molumby, Niamh (2021)
    “Groovy Outfitters” is a clothing brand developed for a tentative business plan for the class Fashion Entrepreneurship (FASH 231) during the Spring 2020 semester. It is intended for potential investors with the purpose of obtaining a loan to launch the business. The brand is inspired by vintage clothes from the 1960s and 1970s. It is fun, retro clothing that is easy to mix and match and has big pockets that are perfect for the modern, on-the-go woman, combining vintage styles with modern comfort. The debut collection includes five pieces and caters to young women between the ages of 18 and 30 who live in New York. This business plan covers several vital aspects of starting a successful company, including illustrations of the products, market research, competition analysis, and financial planning.
  • Student Textbook and Course Material Survey

    Jensen, Jennifer M. K.; Beck, Edward J.; Strauss, Jade; Cordice-Little, Britney (2021)
    The average cost of college textbooks has risen dramatically over the last decade, contributing to textbook price inflation and students’ inability to access the same educational resources. Open Educational Resources (OER) allow teaching, learning and research materials to be open to the public in any medium under a family of copyright licensing policies. Openly licensed course materials can be equally accessed by all students on the first day of classes and are often low or no cost. As students ourselves and workers with the on campus OER team, we constructed a Student Textbook Survey and explored the data to better understand the effects of textbook cost on students at Oneonta. The survey contains 21 questions that range from textbook accessibility, cost and purchasing logistics. Data is still being collected, and so far, our findings indicate the average amount of money spent on textbooks is ~$100-$300 each semester. A majority of student respondents indicated that they did not purchase/rent the required textbook for a course in the past. Students also informed us that throughout their entire college career approximately 5 books were purchased but then were not used in the course. This baseline survey analysis is a push for open educational resources to improve the OER initiative based on how students are affected by textbook costs.
  • Assessment of Invasive Quagga Mussel Populations and Forced Circulation Devices on Lake Water Temperature in Otsego Lake, NY

    Yokota, Kiyoko; Stickney, Sierra (2021)
    Aquatic invasive species pose a threat to our local ecosystems and can have economic impacts. Quagga mussels (Dreissena bugensis) and Zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) are two types of invasive bivalves from Ukraine that have infiltrated Otsego Lake, in Otsego County, New York. Quagga mussels were recently identified in the Northern end of the lake on August 22, 2020. Both Quagga and Zebra mussels can be transported from water body to water body via watercrafts, fishing gear and other recreational equipment. Quagga mussels can survive and reproduce in deeper waters compared to zebra mussels. This poses a problem as reproductive females of Quagga mussels were observed in Lake Erie at a depth of 37 and 55 m, with temperatures ranging from 6 and 4.8°C respectively (Roe and MacIsaac 1997). Therefore, it can be expected that Quagga mussels could potentially colonize Otsego Lake all the way to the bottom. Additionally, several forced air circulation devices are found around Otsego Lake, including at the SUNY Oneonta Biological Field Station boathouse. These devices known as “ice eaters” prevent the formation of ice on the surface as it runs continuously through the winter. The artificial loss of ice at the surface, eliminates the natural “reverse stratification” where deeper water (4 to 5°C in Otsego Lake) is well protected from decreasing temperatures due to the less dense water and ice at the top. However, if more shoreline artificially loses ice, there could be faster “lake-wide-ice-out” in the spring when solar radiation and warmer air heat the surface of the water faster in the absence of snow or ice. Mussel sample traps will be deployed at several locations around Otsego Lake including locations near an “ice eater” and in deeper parts of the lake. In May, the traps will be collected and both Quagga and Zebra mussels will be tallied, sized, and estimated for age using the ridges located on the surface of the shell. Temperature loggers will be deployed by a rope attached to an anchor at strategic locations around the “ice eater” at BFS Boathouse. This will then capture data from the area affected by the artificial circulation as well control sites that have otherwise similar bathymetric and shoreline characteristics. This research aims to evaluate the ability of Quagga mussels to survive and grow during the winter of 2021, and this will be compared to the established Zebra mussel. This study also aims to determine the effects of continuous forced air circulation on lake water temperature. The results will aid in predicting the possible consequences of continued forced circulation on lake-wide thermal dynamics and how this may influence water quality. Additionally, the results from the mussel traps may reveal potential effects of ice eaters on the population dynamics between Zebra mussels and the recently introduced Quagga mussels.
  • Racism and Sexuality: How Women of Color Learn about Sex and the Body

    Seale, Elizabeth; Medrano, Jay (2021)
    The purpose of Racism and Sexuality: How Women of Color Learn about Sex and the Body is to explore how women and female-assigned people of color are taught about sexuality and sex-negativity through the lens of race. Sex negativity is described as the perception of sex being dangerous, harmful, or deviant; those who grow up in sex-negative cycles believe sex and therefore their body is shameful. Participants were nine women and female-assigned people of color aged 18-20 interviewed through Zoom due to COVID-19 restrictions. The results showed a triple jeopardy of youth, race, and gender as significant factors in how participants viewed body image and sexuality. Participants resorted to self-regulation as a way to combat certain perceptions and sex-negative roles in their daily lives as a result of their intersecting identities.
  • Biologically normal sleep in the mother-infant dyad

    Rudzik, Alanna E. F.; Ball, Helen L. (Wiley, 2021)
    Objectives: We examine infant sleep from evolutionary, historico‐cultural, and statistical/epidemiological perspectives and explore the distinct conceptions of “normal” produced by each. We use data from the “Sleeping Like a Baby” study to illustrate how these perspectives influence the ideals and practices of new parents. Methods: The “Sleeping Like a Baby” study investigated maternal–infant sleep in north‐east England. Sleep data for exclusively breastfeeding (EBF) and formula‐feeding (EFF) dyads were captured every 2 weeks from 4 to 18 weeks postpartum through actigraphy and maternal report. Mothers also reported their infant sleep ideals and practices. Results explore objective and maternally‐reported infant sleep parameters, and concordance of maternal ideals and practices with public health guidance. Results: Comparison of sleep measures showed that mothers overestimate infant sleep duration compared with actigraphy; EFF mothers' reports were significantly more inaccurate than those of EBF mothers. For infants moved to a separate bedroom, maternally‐reported sleep increases were not borne out by actigraphy. Across the study period, concordance of maternal ideal sleep location with public health recommendations occurred on average for 54% of mothers, while concordance in practice fell from 75% at 4–8 weeks to 67% at 14–18 weeks. Discordance for EBF dyads occurred due to bedsharing, and for EFF dyads due to infants sleeping in a room alone. Conclusions: Beliefs about “normal” infant sleep influence parents' perceptions and practices. Clinical and scientific infant sleep discourses reinforce dominant societal norms and perpetuate these beliefs, but biological and evolutionary views on infant sleep norms are beginning to gain traction with parents and health practitioners.
  • Residential immersive life skills programs for youth with disabilities: a case study of youth developmental trajectories of personal growth and caregiver perspectives

    Rudzik, Alanna E. F.; McPherson, Amy C.; King, Gillian; Kingsnorth, Shauna (BMC / Springer Nature, 2019)
    Background: Professional support in pediatric and rehabilitation care environments has been recommended as a means to build youth competence in life skills during their transition to adulthood. Life skills are the essential psychosocial competencies and interpersonal skills needed to manage one’s life. Residential immersive life skills (RILS) programs offer youth with physical disabilities enriched learning environments to acquire these skills. This study explored trajectories of personal growth in life skills and positive psychological outcomes among youth participating in a RILS program and related caregiver perspectives. Method: Delivered by a multidisciplinary healthcare team, The Independence Program is an intensive summer program housed in a college residence that provides realistic experiences of living away from home for small groups of youth between 17 and 21 years of age who have congenital and/or acquired physical disabilities. Using a longitudinal case study and qualitative descriptive design, four youth and their parents/guardians participated in semi-structured interviews prior to, and then 1 month, and 3 to 4 months after the program. A conventional content analysis yielded chronological narratives for each youth and caregiver dyad of their experiences, perceptions and outcomes over time. These narratives were further summarized using a ‘line of development’ perspective to describe individual developmental trajectories of personal growth. Results: All four of the youth returned from the program with positive reports about the new life skills acquired and new behaviours they engaged in. These positive reports generally continued post-program, albeit with differing trajectories unique to each youth and varying levels of congruence with their caregivers’ readiness to support, accommodate and facilitate these changes. Caregivers differed in their capacity to shift in their parenting role to support consolidation of youth life skill competencies following program participation. Conclusions: RILS programs can be transformative. Varied youth trajectories identified significant personal growth through enhanced self-determination, self-efficacy and self-advocacy. Congruence in youth and caregiver perceptions of post-program changes was an important transactional factor. Professional support addressing caregiver needs may be beneficial to facilitate developmentally appropriate shifts in parenting roles. This shift is central to a model of shared management whereby adolescents take on greater responsibility for their own care and life choices.
  • Plandemic, Propaganda & Politics: Scientific Misinformation During COVID-19

    Stengler, Erik; Miller, Kaitlyn N. (SUNY Oneonta, 2021)
    Is COVID-19 misinformation spread by one political affiliation more than others? Misinformation – whether scientific, historical or on social topics – has devastating and fatal consequences. Whether the misinformation is disseminated during a public health crisis or a war, whether it is in the United States or another nation, propaganda has long been a tool to exploit people’s motivations and trust. A deeper understanding of the spread and acceptance of misinformation will help science communicators – and possibly others – to earn the public’s trust. Only then can scientists prevent another heavily polarized public health crisis that could result in thousands more of needless deaths. By using a multidisciplinary and mixed methods approach, this research dissects the roots of misinformation and why some people are more susceptible than others. For example, some Americans find that mask mandates during the COVID-19 pandemic are against their constitutional rights to choose. Combining this with Dr. Anthony Fauci once saying that there was no reason to be wearing one, these Americans find themselves more susceptible to believing anti-mask misinformation. An analysis of 1000 tweets containing misinformation shows that proponents of then-U.S. President Donald Trump are significantly more likely to believe and therefore spread misinformation, as opposed to opponents and those without a clear political affiliation. Various topics of misinformation encountered during the data collection are researched to find their possible origins. Many, such as fake cures and anti-mask claims, are linked to comments made by President Trump and/or his most notorious allies.
  • Examining health equity through satisfaction and confidence of patients in primary healthcare in the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago

    Rudzik, Alanna E. F. (BioMed Central, 2003)
    Surveys of patient satisfaction are widely used for identifying priorities and problems in healthcare reforms. The present study examined satisfaction and confidence of patients in public healthcare in Trinidad and Tobago. Data were gathered by interviewing a random sample (n = 280) of primary healthcare (PHC) patients. Level of patient satisfaction was high but not constant. Results of interviews showed that patients with a higher monthly income (p = 0.032) and patients who most recently used private medical care (p = 0.037) had lower levels of satisfaction with health services. Employment had an effect on satisfaction (p = 0.065), significant among patients who had recently accessed private medical care (p = 0.039). Patients using PHC clinics preferred private care to public care. Confidence in public care decreased with increasing complexity of the medical condition. These preliminary results support continued efforts in health-sector reforms and call for the enhancement of data on satisfaction through more comprehensive qualitative data-collection methods.
  • The Experience and Determinants of First-Time Breast-Feeding Duration among Low-Income Women from São Paulo, Brazil

    Rudzik, Alanna E. F. (University of Chicago Press, 2012)
    While the ability to breast-feed is virtually universal among women, the experience of breast-feeding is particular to each woman and is influenced by her social, economic, and personal circumstances. This paper explores quantitative and experience-focused ethnographic data on the experiences of low-income women from the eastern periphery of the city of São Paulo, Brazil, who were breast-feeding for the first time. The prospective, longitudinal data collection method involved repeated in-depth interviews with a group of 65 women, from the end of pregnancy through the first 12 weeks postpartum. Multivariate statistical analyses of the quantitative data revealed that older age, lower interpersonal satisfaction, and unplanned pregnancy shortened the period of exclusive breast-feeding and increased women’s likelihood of having begun supplementation by 12 weeks postpartum. Ethnographic data analysis exposed the meanings of breast-feeding and motherhood for women who had experienced unplanned pregnancy and helped to shed light on the dramatic influence of unplanned pregnancy on women’s breast-feeding practice.

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