• MULTI-FUNCTIONAL EFFECTOR RESPONSES ELICITED FROM IgM MEMORY STEM CELLS

      Winslow, Gary; Kenderes, Kevin (2017)
      The response of memory B cells to challenge infection is fundamental to longterm protection against pathogens. Following challenge, memory B cells can rapidly differentiate into antibody-secreting cells (ASCs) to produce a secondary antibody response. Memory B cells have also been shown to re-enter into germinal centers and undergo additional rounds of affinity maturation. Both the isotype of the B cell and the signals that generated the B cell have been proposed to modulate how memory B cells respond. Initial studies proposed BCR-intrinsic factors are responsible for the differentiation of memory cells. IgM memory cells undergo differentiation in GCs following antigen challenge, while IgG memory cells rapidly differentiate into ASCs. Other studies found no link-between BCR isotype and differentiation. We investigated the differentiation of T-bet+ CD11c+ IgM memory B cells following challenge infection. IgM memory cells differentiated into IgM-producing plasmablasts. Other IgM memory B cells entered germinal centers, underwent class switching, and became switched memory cells. Yet other donor cells were maintained as IgM memory cells. The IgM memory cells also retained their multi-lineage potential following serial transfer. The kinetics of the IgM memory response mimicked the kinetics of the primary response. Thus, IgM memory cells can differentiate into all effector B cell lineages, and undergo self-renewal, properties that are characteristic of stem cells; however, differentiation occurs with the same kinetics of the primary response. We propose that memory B cells have varying degrees of stem cell likeness. IgM memory stem cells retain the most differentiating capacity but respond to challenge similarly to naïve cells, while IgG effector memory cells are primed to rapidly differentiate into IgG ASCs.