• Neuropsychological intra-individual variability explains unique genetic variance of ADHD and shows suggestive linkage to chromosomes 12, 13, and 17

      Frazier-Wood, Alexis C.; Bralten, Janita; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Luman, Marjolein; Ooterlaan, Jaap; Sergeant, Joseph; Faraone, Stephen V.; Buitelaar, Jan; Franke, Barbara; Kuntsi, Jonna; et al. (Wiley, 2012-01-05)
      Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a highly heritable neuropsychiatric disorder that is usually accompanied by neuropsychological impairments. The use of heritable, psychometrically robust traits that show association with the disorder of interest can increase the power of gene-finding studies. Due to the robust association of intra-individual variability with ADHD on a phenotypic and genetic level, intra-individual variability is a prime candidate for such an attempt. We aimed to combine intra-individual variability measures across tasks into one more heritable measure, to examine the relatedness to other cognitive factors, and to explore the genetic underpinnings through quantitative trait linkage analysis. Intra-individual variability measures from seven tasks were available for 238 ADHD families (350 ADHD-affected and 195 non-affected children) and 147 control families (271 children). Intra-individual variability measures from seven different tasks shared common variance and could be used to construct an aggregated measure. This aggregated measure was largely independent from other cognitive factors related to ADHD and showed suggestive linkage to chromosomes 12q24.3 (LOD ¼ 2.93), 13q22.2 (LOD ¼ 2.36), and 17p13.3 (LOD ¼ 2.00). A common intra-individual variability construct can be extracted from very diverse neuropsychological tasks; this construct taps into unique genetic aspects of ADHD and may relate to loci conferring risk for ADHD (12q24.3 and 17p13.3) and possibly autism (12q24.3). Given that joining of data across sites boosts the power for genetic analyses, our findings are promising in showing that intra-individual variability measures are viable candidates for across site analyses where different tasks have been used.
    • The new neuropsychiatric genetics

      Faraone, Stephen V.; Smoller, J.W.; Pato, C.N.; Sullivan, P.; Tsuang, M.T. (Wiley, 2008-01-05)
    • NIMH genetics initiative millennium schizophrenia consortium: Linkage analysis of African-American pedigrees

      Kaufmann, Charles A.; Suarez, Brian; Malaspina, Dolores; Pepple, John; Svrakic, Dragan; Markel, Paul D.; Meyer, Joanne; Zambuto, Christopher T.; Schmitt, Karin; Matise, Tara Cox; et al. (Wiley, 1998-07-10)
      The NIMH Genetics Initiative is a multi-site collaborative study designed to create a national resource for genetic studies of complex neuropsychiatric disorders. Schizophrenia pedigrees have been collected at three sites: Washington University, Columbia University, and Harvard University. This article—one in a series that describes the results of a genome-wide scan with 459 short-tandem repeat (STR) markers for susceptibility loci in the NIMH Genetics Initiative schizophrenia sample—presents results for African-American pedigrees. The African-American sample comprises 30 nuclear families and 98 subjects. Seventy-nine of the family members were considered affected by virtue of having received a DSMIII-R diagnosis of schizophrenia (n = 71) or schizoaffective disorder, depressed (n = 8). The families contained a total of 42 independent sib pairs. While no region demonstrated evidence of significant linkage using the criteria suggested by Lander and Kruglyak, several regions, including chromosomes 6q16-6q24, 8pter-8q12, 9q32-9q34, and 15p13-15q12, showed evidence consistent with linkage (P = 0.01–0.05), providing independent support of findings reported in other studies. Moreover, the fact that different genetic loci were identified in this and in the European-American samples, lends credence to the notion that these genetic differences together with differences in environmental exposures may contribute to the reported differences in disease prevalence, severity, comorbidity, and course that has been observed in different racial groups in the United States and elsewhere. Am. J. Med. Genet. (Neuropsychiatr. Genet.) 81:282–289, 1998. © 1998 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
    • Patterns of Psychopathology and Dysfunction in High-Risk Children of Parents With Panic Disorder and Major Depression

      Biederman, Joseph; Faraone, Stephen V.; Hirshfeld-Becker, Dina R.; Friedman, Deborah; Robin, Joanna A.; Rosenbaum, Jerrold F. (American Psychiatric Association Publishing, 2001-01)
      Objective: The purpose of the study was to evaluate 1) whether an underlying familial predisposition is shared by all anxiety disorders or whether specific risks are associated with specific disorders, and 2) whether panic disorder and major depression have a familial link. Method: The study compared four groups of children: 1) offspring of parents with panic disorder and comorbid major depression (N=179), 2) offspring of parents with panic disorder without comorbid major depression (N=29), 3) offspring of parents with major depression without comorbid panic disorder (N=59), and 4) offspring of parents with neither panic disorder nor major depression (N=113). Results: Parental panic disorder, regardless of comorbidity with major depression, was associated with an increased risk for panic disorder and agoraphobia in offspring. Parental major depression, regardless of comorbidity with panic disorder, was associated with increased risks for social phobia, major depression, disruptive behavior disorders, and poorer social functioning in offspring. Both parental panic disorder and parental major depression, individually or comorbidly, were associated with increased risk for separation anxiety disorder and multiple (two or more) anxiety disorders in offspring. Conclusions: These findings confirm and extend previous results documenting significant associations between the presence of panic disorder and major depression in parents and patterns of psychopathology and dysfunction in their offspring.
    • Pediatric mania: a developmental subtype of bipolar disorder?

      Biederman, Joseph; Mick, Eric; Faraone, Stephen V.; Spencer, Thomas; Wilens, Timothy E; Wozniak, Janet (Elsevier BV, 2000-09)
      Despite ongoing controversy, the view that pediatric mania is rare or nonexistent has been increasingly challenged not only by case reports, but also by systematic research. This research strongly suggests that pediatric mania may not be rare but that it may be difficult to diagnose. Since children with mania are likely to become adults with bipolar disorder, the recognition and characterization of childhood-onset mania may help identify a meaningful developmental subtype of bipolar disorder worthy of further investigation. The major difficulties that complicate the diagnosis of pediatric mania include: 1) its pattern of comorbidity may be unique by adult standards, especially its overlap with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, aggression, and conduct disorder; 2) its overlap with substance use disorders; 3) its association with trauma and adversity; and 4) its response to treatment is atypical by adult standards. Biol Psychiatry 2000;48: 458–466 © 2000 Society of Biological Psychiatry.
    • Pediatric mania: a developmental subtype of bipolar disorder?

      Biederman, Joseph; Mick, Eric; Faraone, Stephen V.; Spencer, Thomas; Wilens, Timothy E; Wozniak, Janet (Elsevier BV, 2000-09)
    • Placebo and nocebo responses in randomised, controlled trials of medications for ADHD: a systematic review and meta-analysis

      Faraone, Stephen V.; Newcorn, Jeffrey H.; Cipriani, Andrea; Brandeis, Daniel; Kaiser, Anna; Hohmann, Sarah; Haege, Alexander; Cortese, Samuele (Springer Science and Business Media LLC, 2021-05-10)
      The nature and magnitude of placebo and nocebo responses to ADHD medications and the extent to which response to active medications and placebo are inter-correlated is unclear. To assess the magnitude of placebo and nocebo responses to ADHD and their association with active treatment response. We searched literature until June 26, 2019, for published/ unpublished double-blind, randomised placebo-controlled trials (RCTs) of ADHD medication. Authors were contacted for additional data. We assessed placebo effects on efficacy and nocebo effects on tolerability using random effects metaanalysis. We assessed the association of study design and patient features with placebo/nocebo response. We analysed 128 RCTs (10,578 children/adolescents and 9175 adults) and found significant and heterogenous placebo effects for all efficacy outcomes, with no publication bias. The placebo effect was greatest for clinician compared with other raters. We found nocebo effects on tolerability outcomes. Efficacy outcomes from most raters showed significant positive correlations between the baseline to endpoint placebo effects and the baseline to endpoint drug effects. Placebo and nocebo effects did not differ among drugs. Baseline severity and type of rating scale influenced the findings. Shared non-specific factors influence response to both placebo and active medication. Although ADHD medications are superior to placebo, and placebo treatment in clinical practice is not feasible, clinicians should attempt to incorporate factors associated with placebo effects into clinical care. Future studies should explore how such effects influence response to medication treatment. Upon publication, data will be available in Mendeley Data: PROSPERO (CRD42019130292).
    • Psychoactive substance use disorders in adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD): effects of ADHD and psychiatric comorbidity

      Biederman, J; Wilens, T; Mick, E; Milberger, S; Spencer, T J; Faraone, Stephen V. (American Psychiatric Association Publishing, 1995-11)
      Objective: The authors evaluated the association between attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and psychoactive substance use disorders in adults with ADHD, attending to comorbidity with mood, anxiety, and antisocial disorders. It was hypothesized that psychiatric comorbidity would be a risk factor for psychoactive substance use disorders. Method: Findings for 120 referred adults with a clinical diagnosis ofchildhood-onset ADHD were compared with those for non-ADHD adult comparison subjects (N=268). All childhood and adult diagnoses were obtained by structured psychiatric interviews for DSM-III-R. Rı ıiiIt.ıi There was a significantly higher lifetime risk for psychoactive substance use disorders in the ADHD adults than in the comparison subjects (52% versus 27%). Although the two groups did not differ in the rate ofalcohol use disorders, the ADHD adults had significantly higher rates ofdrug and drug plus alcohol use disorders than the comparison subjects. ADHD significantly increased the risk for substance use disorders independently ofpsychiatric comorbidity. Antisocial disorders significantly increased the risk for substance use disorders independently ofADHD status. Mood and anxiety disorders increased the risk for substance use disorders in both the ADHD and comparison subjects, but more demonstrably in the comparison subjects. Conclusions: Although psychiatric comorbidity increased the risk for psychoactive substance use disorders in adults with ADHD, by itself ADHD was a significant risk factor for substance use disorders. More information is needed to further delineate risk and protective factors mediating the development of substance use disorders in persons with ADHD.
    • RASD2, MYH9, and CACNG2 Genes at Chromosome 22q12 Associated with the Subgroup of Schizophrenia with Non-Deficit in Sustained Attention and Executive Function

      Liu, Yu-Li; Fann, Cathy Shen-Jang; Liu, Chih-Min; Chen, Wei J.; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Hung, Shuen-Iu; Chen, Chun-Houh; Jou, Yuh-Shan; Liu, Shi-Kai; Hwang, Tzung-Jeng; et al. (Elsevier BV, 2008-11)
      Background: In a previous linkage study of schizophrenia that included Taiwanese samples, the marker D22S278 (22q12.3) was significantly linked to schizophrenia (p .001). Methods: We conducted fine mapping of the implicated genomic region, with 47 validated single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers around 1 Mb of D22S278, in a Taiwanese sample of 218 pedigrees with at least 2 siblings affected with schizophrenia. We examined the association of these SNPs and their haplotypes with schizophrenia and with subgroups defined by the presence and absence of deficits in sustained attention as assessed by undegraded and degraded continuous performance tests (CPTs). We also examined subgroups defined by deficits in categories achieved in the Wisconsin Card Sort Test (WCST). Results: Three of five candidate vulnerability genes (RASD2, APOL5, MYH9, EIF3S7, and CACNG2), which had marginally significant associations with schizophrenia, had significant associations with schizophrenic patients who did not have deficits in sustained attention on the undegraded CPT (RASD2 gene SNP rs736212; p .0008 with single locus analysis) and the degraded CPT (MYH9 gene haplotype 1-1-1-1 of SNP rs3752463 - rs1557540 - rs713839 - rs739097; p .0059 with haplotype analysis). We also found a significant association for patients who showed no deficits in executive function as measured by categories achieved in the WCST (CACNG2 gene haplotype 2-1-1-1 of SNP rs2267360 - rs140526 - rs1883987 - rs916269; p .0163 with haplotype analysis). Conclusions: The genes RASD2, MYH9, and CACNG2 might be vulnerability genes for neuropsychologically defined subgroups of schizophrenic patients.
    • Report from the second international meeting of the attention deficit hyperactivity disorder Molecular Genetics Network

      Faraone, Stephen V. (Wiley, 2001)
      Given evidence from twin, family, and adoption studies of genetic influence on attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), a growing number of researchers have initiated molecular genetics studies to explore the influence of specific genes on this condition. In 1999, these investigators convened to discuss ways of sharing information and facilitating collaborations across research sites. Enthusiastic response to this first conference prompted an even larger group of investigators to come together this year. This recent meeting, held in London, began with a presentation of Hypescheme, an operational criteria checklist developed in an effort to promote the reliable communication of diagnostic and other relevant clinical information related to ADHD. The benefits and limitations of Hypescheme, as well as the continued challenges to collaboration, were discussed. A new ADHD-specific rating scale, developed to be of use in genetic analyses, was also presented. Focus then turned to collaborative projects proposed by investigators and practical suggestions regarding joint data analyses projects. Finally, new data from individual sites were presented. Because the mode of inheritance of ADHD is likely to be complex, efforts to collaborate and cross-validate findings remain an important priority for researchers studying the molecular genetics of this disorder. © 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
    • Revisiting the factor structure for positive and negative symptoms: evidence from a large heterogeneous group of psychiatric patients

      Toomey, R; Kremen, W S; simpson, J C; Samson, J A; Seidman, L J; Lynons, M J; Faraone, Stephen V.; Tsuang, M T (American Psychiatric Association Publishing, 1997-03)
      O bjective: The factor structures of individual positive and negative symptoms as well as global ratings were examined in a diagnostically heterogeneous group of subjects. Method: Subjects were identified through a clinical and family study of patients with major psychoses at a VA medical center and evaluated with the Scale for the Assessment of N egative Symptoms and the Scale for the Assessment of Positive Symptoms. For the examination of global-level factor structures (N =630), both principal-component analysis and factor analysis with orthogonal rotation were used. Factor analysis was used for the examination of item-level factor structures as well (N =549). Results: The principal-component analysis of global ratings revealed three factors: negative symptoms, positive symptoms, and disorganization. The factor analysis of global ratings revealed a negative symptom factor and a positive symptom factor. The itemlevel factor analysis revealed two negative symptom factors (diminished expression and disordered relating), two positive symptom factors (bizarre delusions and auditory hallucinations), and a disorganization factor. Conclusions: The generation of additional meaningful factors at the item level suggests that important information about symptoms is lost when only global ratings are viewed. Future work should explore clinical and pathological correlates of the more differentiated item-level symptom dimensions
    • Risk variants and polygenic architecture of disruptive behavior disorders in the context of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

      Demontis, Ditte; Walters, Raymond K.; Rajagopal, Veera M.; Waldman, Irwin D.; Grove, Jakob; Als, Thomas D.; Dalsgaard, Søren; Ribasés, Marta; Bybjerg-Grauholm, Jonas; Bækvad-Hansen, Maria; et al. (Springer Science and Business Media LLC, 2021-01-25)
      Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a childhood psychiatric disorder often comorbid with disruptive behavior disorders (DBDs). Here, we report a GWAS meta-analysis of ADHD comorbid with DBDs (ADHD + DBDs) including 3802 cases and 31,305 controls. We identify three genome-wide significant loci on chromosomes 1, 7, and 11. A meta-analysis including a Chinese cohort supports that the locus on chromosome 11 is a strong risk locus for ADHD + DBDs across European and Chinese ancestries (rs7118422, P = 3.15×10−10, OR= 1.17). We find a higher SNP heritability for ADHD + DBDs (h2 SNP = 0.34) when compared to ADHD without DBDs (h2 SNP = 0.20), high genetic correlations between ADHD + DBDs and aggressive (rg = 0.81) and anti-social behaviors (rg = 0.82), and an increased burden (polygenic score) of variants associated with ADHD and aggression in ADHD + DBDs compared to ADHD without DBDs. Our results suggest an increased load of common risk variants in ADHD + DBDs compared to ADHD without DBDs, which in part can be explained by variants associated with aggressive behavior.
    • Risk variants and polygenic architecture of disruptive behavior disorders in the context of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

      Demontis, Ditte; Walters, Raymond K.; Rajagopal, Veera M.; Waldman, Irwin D.; Grove, Jakob; Als, Thomas D.; Dalsgaard, Søren; Ribasés, Marta; Bybjerg-Grauholm, Jonas; Bækvad-Hansen, Maria; et al. (Springer Science and Business Media LLC, 2021-01-25)
      Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a childhood psychiatric disorder often comorbid with disruptive behavior disorders (DBDs). Here, we report a GWAS meta-analysis of ADHD comorbid with DBDs (ADHD + DBDs) including 3802 cases and 31,305 controls. We identify three genome-wide significant loci on chromosomes 1, 7, and 11. A meta-analysis including a Chinese cohort supports that the locus on chromosome 11 is a strong risk locus for ADHD + DBDs across European and Chinese ancestries (rs7118422, P = 3.15×10-10, OR = 1.17). We find a higher SNP heritability for ADHD + DBDs (h2SNP = 0.34) when compared to ADHD without DBDs (h2SNP = 0.20), high genetic correlations between ADHD + DBDs and aggressive (rg = 0.81) and anti-social behaviors (rg = 0.82), and an increased burden (polygenic score) of variants associated with ADHD and aggression in ADHD + DBDs compared to ADHD without DBDs. Our results suggest an increased load of common risk variants in ADHD + DBDs compared to ADHD without DBDs, which in part can be explained by variants associated with aggressive behavior.
    • Separating Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and Learning Disabilities in Girls: A Familial Risk Analysis

      Doyle, Alysa E.; Faraone, Stephen V.; DuPre, Emily P.; Biederman, Joseph (American Psychiatric Association Publishing, 2001-10)
      Objective: Familial risk analysis was used to clarify the relationship in girls between attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and learning disabilities in either mathematics or reading. Method: The authors assessed the presence of ADHD and learning disabilities in 679 first-degree relatives of three groups of index children: girls with ADHD and a comorbid learning disability, girls with ADHD but no learning disabilities, and a comparison group of girls without ADHD. Results: The risk for ADHD was similarly higher in families of ADHD probands with and without learning disabilities; both groups had significantly higher rates of ADHD than did families of the comparison girls. In contrast, only among relatives of ADHD probands with a learning disability was there a higher risk for learning disabilities. A strong (although statistically nonsignificant) difference emerged that suggested at least some degree of cosegregation of ADHD and learning disabilities in family members. There was no evidence of nonrandom mating between spouses with ADHD and learning disabilities. Conclusions: These results extend previously reported findings regarding the relationship of ADHD and learning disabilities to female subjects and raise the possibility that, in girls, the relationship between ADHD and learning disabilities is due to shared familial risk factors.
    • A seq2seq model to forecast the COVID-19 cases, deaths and reproductive R numbers in US counties

      Zhang-James, Yanli; Hess, Jonathan; Salekin, Asif; Wang, Dongliang; Chen, Samuel; Winkelstein, Peter; Morley, Christopher P; Faraone, Stephen V. (Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, 2021-04-20)
      The global pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has killed almost two million people worldwide and over 400 thousand in the United States (US). As the pandemic evolves, informed policy-making and strategic resource allocation relies on accurate forecasts. To predict the spread of the virus within US counties, we curated an array of county-level demographic and COVID-19-relevant health risk factors. In combination with the county-level case and death numbers curated by John Hopkins university, we developed a forecasting model using deep learning (DL). We implemented an autoencoder-based Seq2Seq model with gated recurrent units (GRUs) in the deep recurrent layers. We trained the model to predict future incident cases, deaths and the reproductive number, R. For most counties, it makes accurate predictions of new incident cases, deaths and R values, up to 30 days in the future. Our framework can also be used to predict other targets that are useful indices for policymaking, for example hospitalization or the occupancy of intensive care units. Our DL framework is publicly available on GitHub and can be adapted for other indices of the COVID-19 spread. We hope that our forecasts and model can help local governments in the continued fight against COVID-19.
    • Shared polygenic risk for ADHD, executive dysfunction and other psychiatric disorders

      Chang, Suhua; Yang, Li; Wang, Yufeng; Faraone, Stephen V. (Springer Science and Business Media LLC, 2020-06-09)
      Many psychiatric disorders are associated with impaired executive functioning (EF). The associated EF component varies by psychiatric disorders, and this variation might be due to genetic liability. We explored the genetic association between five psychiatric disorders and EF in clinically-recruited attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) children using polygenic risk score (PRS) methodology. Genome-wide association study (GWAS) summary data for ADHD, major depressive disorder (MDD), schizophrenia (SZ), bipolar disorder (BIP) and autism were used to calculate the PRSs. EF was evaluated by the Stroop test for inhibitory control, the trail-making test for cognitive flexibility, and the digital span test for working memory in a Chinese ADHD cohort (n = 1147). Exploratory factor analysis of the three measures identified one principal component for EF (EF-PC). Linear regression models were used to analyze the association between each PRS and the EF measures. The role of EF measures in mediating the effects of the PRSs on ADHD symptoms was also analyzed. The result showed the PRSs for MDD, ADHD and BIP were all significantly associated with the EF-PC. For each EF component, the association results were different for the PRSs of the five psychiatric disorders: the PRSs for ADHD and MDD were associated with inhibitory control (adjusted P = 0.0183 and 0.0313, respectively), the PRS for BIP was associated with working memory (adjusted P = 0.0416), and the PRS for SZ was associated with cognitive flexibility (adjusted P = 0.0335). All three EF measures were significantly correlated with ADHD symptoms. In mediation analyses, the ADHD and MDD PRSs, which were associated with inhibitory control, had significant indirect effects on ADHD symptoms through the mediation of inhibitory control. These findings indicate that the polygenic risks for several psychiatric disorders influence specific executive dysfunction in children with ADHD. The results helped to clarify the relationship between risk genes of each mental disorder and the intermediate cognitive domain, which may further help elucidate the risk genes and motivate efforts to develop EF measures as a diagnostic marker and future treatment target.
    • Six-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of desipramine for adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

      Wilen, T E; Biederman, J; Prince, J; spencer, T J; Faraone, Stephen V.; Warburton, R; Schleifer, D; Harding, M; Linehan, C; Geller, D (American Psychiatric Association Publishing, 1996-09)
      O bjective: The factor structures of individual positive and negative symptoms as well as global ratings were examined in a diagnostically heterogeneous group of subjects. Method: Subjects were identified through a clinical and family study of patients with major psychoses at a VA medical center and evaluated with the Scale for the Assessment of N egative Symptoms and the Scale for the Assessment of Positive Symptoms. For the examination of global-level factor structures (N =630), both principal-component analysis and factor analysis with orthogonal rotation were used. Factor analysis was used for the examination of item-level factor structures as well (N =549). Results: The principal-component analysis of global ratings revealed three factors: negative symptoms, positive symptoms, and disorganization. The factor analysis of global ratings revealed a negative symptom factor and a positive symptom factor. The itemlevel factor analysis revealed two negative symptom factors (diminished expression and disordered relating), two positive symptom factors (bizarre delusions and auditory hallucinations), and a disorganization factor. Conclusions: The generation of additional meaningful factors at the item level suggests that important information about symptoms is lost when only global ratings are viewed. Future work should explore clinical and pathological correlates of the more differentiated item-level symptom dimensions
    • Sodium hydrogen exchanger 9 NHE9 ( SLC9A9 ) and its emerging roles in neuropsychiatric comorbidity

      Patak, Jameson; Faraone, Stephen V.; Zhang‐James, Yanli (Wiley, 2020-05-13)
      Variations in SLC9A9 gene expression and protein function are associated with multiple human diseases, which range from Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) to glioblastoma multiforme. In an effort to determine the full spectrum of human disease associations with SLC9A9, we performed a systematic review of the literature. We also review SLC9A9's biochemistry, protein structure, and function, as well as its interacting partners with the goal of identifying mechanisms of disease and druggable targets. We report gaps in the literature regarding the genes function along with consistent trends in disease associations that can be used to further research into treating the respective diseases. We report that SLC9A9 has strong associations with neuropsychiatric diseases and various cancers. Interestingly, we find strong overlap in SLC9A9 disease associations and propose a novel role for SLC9A9 in neuropsychiatric comorbidity. In conclusion, SLC9A9 is a multifunctional protein that, through both its endosome regulatory function and its protein–protein interaction network, has the ability to modulate signaling axes, such as the PI3K pathway, among others.
    • Stability of executive function deficits into young adult years: a prospective longitudinal follow-up study of grown up males with ADHD

      Biederman, J.; Petty, C. R.; Fried, R.; Doyle, A. E.; Spencer, T.; Seidman, L. J.; Gross, L.; Poetzl, K.; Faraone, Stephen V. (Wiley, 2007-08)
      Objective: Although individuals with attention deficit‐hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) commonly exhibit deficits in executive functions that greatly increase the morbidity of the disorder, all available information on the subject is cross sectional. Method: Males (n = 85) 9–22 years with ADHD followed over 7 years into young adulthood were assessed on measures of sustained attention/vigilance, planning and organization, response inhibition, set shifting and categorization, selective attention and visual scanning, verbal and visual learning, and memory. A binary definition of executive function deficits (EFDs) was defined based on a subject manifesting at least two abnormal tests 1.5 standard deviations from controls. Results: The majority of subjects maintained EFDs over time (kappa: 0.41, P < 0.001; sensitivity: 55%, specificity: 85%, positive predictive value: 69%, and negative predictive value: 75%). Conclusion: Considering the morbidity of EFDs, these findings stress the importance of their early recognition for prevention and early intervention strategies. EFDs are stable over time.