• Further evidence of an association between maternal smoking during pregnancy and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: Findings from a high-risk sample of siblings

      Milberger, Sharon; Biederman, Joseph; Faraone, Stephen V.; Jones, Janice (Informa UK Limited, 1998-09)
      The authors investigated the relationship between attentiondeficit/byperactivity disorder (ADHD) and cigarette smoking in siblings of ADHD and non-ADHD probands. They conducted a 4-year follow-up of siblings from ADHD and control-group families. In the siblings of ADHD probands, ADHD was associated with higher rates and earlier onset of cigarette smoking. There was also a significant positive association between cigarette smoking and conduct disorder, major depression, and drug abuse in the siblings, even after adjusting for confounding variables. Moreover, smoking was found to be familial among ADHD families but not control-group families. Our findings indicate that ADHD is a risk factor for early initiation of cigarette smoking in the high-risk siblings of ADHD probands
    • Further Evidence of Association Between Behavioral Inhibition and Social Anxiety in Children

      Biederman, Joseph; Hirshfeld-Becker, Dina R.; Rosenbaum, Jerrold F.; Hérot, Christine; Friedman, Deborah; Snidman, Nancy; Kagan, Jerome; Faraone, Stephen V. (American Psychiatric Association Publishing, 2001-10)
      Objective: The authors sought to examine psychopathological correlates of behavioral inhibition in young offspring of parents with panic disorder and/or major depression. Method: Behavioral inhibition, determined by using standard laboratory observations, was assessed in four groups of children (age 2–6 years): 129 children of parents with both panic disorder and major depression, 22 children of parents with panic disorder alone, 49 children of parents with major depression alone, and 84 comparison children of parents with neither panic disorder nor major depression. Psychopathology in children ≥5 years was compared between children with behavioral inhibition (N=64) and without (N=152). Results: Social anxiety disorder (social phobia or avoidant disorder) was significantly more likely to be found in the children with behavioral inhibition (17%) than in those without (5%). Noninhibited children were significantly more likely than inhibited children to have disruptive behavior disorders (20% versus 6%, respectively) and had higher scores on the attention problems scale of the Child Behavior Checklist (mean=52.1 versus 50.8). Conclusions: This study adds to the growing literature suggesting an association between behavioral inhibition and social anxiety disorder and an inverse relationship between inhibition and disruptive behavior disorders.
    • Further investigation of a chromosome 15 locus in schizophrenia: Analysis of affected sibpairs from the NIMH genetics initiative

      Leonard, Sherry; Gault, Judith; Moore, Theodore; Hopkins, Jan; Robinson, Misi; Olincy, Ann; Adler, Lawrence E.; Cloninger, C. Robert; Kaufmann, Charles A.; Tsuang, Ming T.; et al. (Wiley, 1998-07-10)
      Linkage of a neurophysiological deficit associated with schizophrenia, i.e., the failure to inhibit the auditory P50 response, was previously reported at chromosome 15q14. The marker with the highest pairwise lod score, D15S1360, was isolated from a yeast artificial chromosome containing a candidate gene, the α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor gene. In the present study, this linkage was further investigated in a subset of the NIMH Genetics Initiative schizophrenia families. These families have not been studied neurophysiologically, as were the families in the original report. Therefore, the DSMIII-R diagnosis of schizophrenia was used as the affected phenotype. Twenty families fulfilled the criteria of at least one sibpair concordant for schizophrenia, along with their two parents or another affected relative outside the nuclear family, available for genotyping. Sibpair analysis showed a significant proportion of D15S1360 alleles shared identical-by-descent (0.58; P < 0.0024). The results further support the involvement of this chromosomal locus in the genetic transmission of schizophrenia. Am. J. Med. Genet. (Neuropsychiatr. Genet.) 81:308–312, 1998. © 1998 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
    • Genome-wide association study of response to methylphenidate in 187 children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

      Mick, Eric; Neale, Benjamin; Middleton, Frank A.; McGough, James J.; Faraone, Stephen V. (Wiley, 2008-12-05)
      We conducted a genome-wide association study of symptom response in an open-label study of a methylphenidate transdermal system (MTS). All DNA extraction and genotyping was conducted at SUNY Upstate Medical University using the Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 6.0. All quality control and association analyses were conducted using the software package PLINK. After data cleaning and quality control, there were 187 subjects (72% (N¼135) male) with mean age 9.2 2.0 years and 319,722 SNPs available for analysis. The most statistically significant association (rs9627183 andrs11134178;P¼3 10 6) fell short of the threshold for a genome-wide significant association. The most intriguing association amongsuggestivefindings(rs3792452;P¼2.6 10 5) was with the metabotropic glutamate receptor 7 gene (GRM7) as it is expressed in brain structures also previously associated with ADHD. Among the 102 available SNPs covering previously studied candidate genes, two SNPs within the norepinephrine transporter gene (NET, SLC6A2) were significant at P 1 10 2. These results should be considered preliminary until replicated in larger adequately powered, controlled samples but do suggest that noradrenergic and possibly glutaminergic genes may be involved with response to methylphenidate.
    • Genome-wide search for schizophrenia susceptibility loci: The NIMH genetics initiative and millennium consortium

      Cloninger, C. Robert; Kaufmann, Charles A.; Faraone, Stephen V.; Malaspina, Dolores; Svrakic, Dragan M.; Harkavy-Friedman, Jill; Suarez, Brian K.; Matise, Tara C.; Shore, David; Lee, Hang; et al. (Wiley, 1998-07-10)
      chizophrenia has a complex pattern of inheritance, indicative of interactions among multiple genes and environmental factors. The detection and replication of specific susceptibility loci for such complex disorders are facilitated by the availability of large samples of affected sib pairs and their nuclear families, along with standardized assessment and systematic ascertainment procedures. The NIMH Genetics Initiative on Schizophrenia, a multisite collaborative study, was established as a national resource with a centralized clinical data base and cell repository. The Millennium Schizophrenia Consortium has completed a genome-wide scan to detect susceptibility loci for schizophrenia in 244 individuals from the nuclear families of 92 independent pairs of schizophrenic sibs ascertained by the NIMH Genetics Initiative. The 459 marker loci used in the scan were spaced at 10-cM intervals on average. Individuals of African descent were higher than those of European descent in their average heterozygosity (79% vs. 76%, P < .0001) and number of alleles per marker (9.2 vs. 8.4, P < .0001). Also, the allele frequencies of 73% of the marker loci differed significantly (P < .01) between individuals of European and African ancestry. However, regardless of ethnic background, this sample was largely comprised of schizophrenics with more than a decade of psychosis associated with pervasive social and occupational impairment. Am. J. Med. Genet. (Neuropsychiatr. Genet.) 81:275–281, 1998. © 1998 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
    • Heterogeneity and the genetics of bipolar disorder

      Faraone, Stephen V.; Tsuang, Ming T. (Wiley, 2003-10-30)
    • Impact of Psychometrically Defined Deficits of Executive Functioning in Adults With Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

      Biederman, Joseph; Petty, Carter; Fried, Ronna; Fontanella, Jessie; Doyle, Alysa E.; Seidman, Larry J.; Faraone, Stephen V. (American Psychiatric Association Publishing, 2006-10)
      Objective: The association between deficits in executive functioning and functional outcomes was examined among adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Method: Subjects were adults who did (N=213) and did not (N=145) meet DSMIV criteria for ADHD. The authors defined having deficits in executive functioning as having at least two measures of executive functioning with scores 1.5 standard deviations below those of matched comparison subjects. Results: Significantly more adults with ADHD had deficits of executive functioning than comparison subjects. Deficits of executive functioning were associated with lower academic achievement, irrespective of ADHD status. Subjects with ADHD with deficits of executive functioning had a significantly lower socioeconomic status and a significant functional morbidity beyond the diagnosis of ADHD alone. Conclusions: Psychometrically defined deficits of executive functioning may help identify a subgroup of adults with ADHD at high risk for occupational and academic underachievement. More efforts are needed to identify cost-effective approaches to screen individuals with ADHD for deficits of executive functioning.
    • Impact of Tic Disorders on ADHD Outcome Across the Life Cycle: Findings From a Large Group of Adults With and Without ADHD

      Spencer, Thomas J.; Biederman, Joseph; Faraone, Stephen V.; Mick, Eric; Coffey, Barbara; Geller, Daniel; Kagan, Jake; Bearman, Sarah Kate; Wilens, Timothy (American Psychiatric Association Publishing, 2001-04)
      Objective: The impact of tic disorders on the outcome of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) remains a subject of high scientific and clinical interest. To evaluate the impact of comorbid ADHD and tic disorders from a lifespan perspective, the authors systematically examined data from adults with and without ADHD. Method: They comprehensively evaluated 312 consecutively referred adults with ADHD and 252 comparison subjects without ADHD. Tic disorders were characterized along with a wide range of neuropsychiatric correlates, including other comorbid disorders as well as indexes of function in the domains of school, cognition, and interpersonal functioning. Results: A significantly greater proportion of adults with ADHD (12%) than those without ADHD (4%) had tic disorders. Tic disorders followed a mostly remitting course and had little impact on functional capacities. In addition, tic disorders were not associated with stimulant use. Conclusions: These findings in adults with ADHD confirm and extend previous findings in young subjects with ADHD, documenting that although individuals with ADHD are at greater risk for tic disorders, the presence of tic disorders has a limited impact on ADHD outcome.
    • Influence of Gender on Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in Children Referred to a Psychiatric Clinic

      Biederman, Joseph; Mick, Eric; Faraone, Stephen V.; Braaten, Ellen; Doyle, Alysa; Spencer, Thomas; Wilens, Timothy E.; Frazier, Elizabeth; Johnson, Mary Ann (American Psychiatric Association Publishing, 2002-01)
      Objective: The substantial discrepancy in the male-to-female ratio between clinic-referred (10 to 1) and community (3 to 1) samples of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) suggests that gender differences may be operant in the phenotypic expression of ADHD. In this study the authors systematically examined the impact of gender on the clinical features of ADHD in a group of children referred to a clinic. Method: The study included 140 boys and 140 girls with ADHD and 120 boys and 122 girls without ADHD as comparison subjects. All subjects were systematically assessed with structured diagnostic interviews and neuropsychological batteries for subtypes of ADHD as well as emotional, school, intellectual, interpersonal, and family functioning. Results: Girls with ADHD were more likely than boys to have the predominantly inattentive type of ADHD, less likely to have a learning disability, and less likely to manifest problems in school or in their spare time. In addition, girls with ADHD were at less risk for comorbid major depression, conduct disorder, and oppositional defiant disorder than boys with ADHD. A statistically significant gender-by-ADHD interaction was identified for comorbid substance use disorders as well. Conclusions: The lower likelihood for girls to manifest psychiatric, cognitive, and functional impairment than boys could result in gender-based referral bias unfavorable to girls with ADHD
    • The influence of genes on “positive valence systems” constructs: A systematic review

      Hess, Jonathan L.; Kawaguchi, Daniel M.; Wagner, Kayla E.; Faraone, Stephen V.; Glatt, Stephen J. (Wiley, 2015-09-14)
      The Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) address three types of aggression: frustrative non-reward, defensive aggression and offensive/proactive aggression. This review sought to present the evidence for genetic underpinnings of aggression and to determine to what degree prior studies have examined phenotypes that fit into the RDoC framework. Although the constructs of defensive and offensive aggression have been widely used in the animal genetics literature, the human literature is mostly agnostic with regard to all the RDoC constructs. We know from twin studies that about half the variance in behavior may be explained by genetic risk factors. This is true for both dimensional, trait-like, measures of aggression and categorical definitions of psychopathology. The non-shared environment seems to have a moderate influence with the effects of shared environment being unclear. Human molecular genetic studies of aggression are in an early stage. The most promising candidates are in the dopaminergic and serotonergic systems along with hormonal regulators. Genome-wide association studies have not yet achieved genome-wide significance, but current samples are too small to detect variants having the small effects one would expect for a complex disorder. The strongest molecular evidence for a genetic basis for aggression comes from animal models comparing aggressive and non-aggressive strains or documenting the effects of gene knockouts. Although we have learned much from these prior studies, future studies should improve the measurement of aggression by using a systematic method of measurement such as that proposed by the RDoC initiative. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    • Influence of Parental SUD and ADHD on ADHD in their Offspring: Preliminary Results from a Pilot-controlled Family Study

      Wilens, Timothy E.; Hahesy, Amy L.; Biederman, Joseph; Bredin, Elizabeth; Tanguay, Sarah; Kwon, Anne; Faraone, Stephen V. (Wiley, 2005-03)
      As part of a pilot-controlled family-based study of the children of parents with and without substance use disorders (SUD), the influence of parental SUD and ADHD on the risk for ADHD in offspring was evaluated. Using structured psychiatric interviews, 96 families (183 youth; mean age 11.6 years) were assessed. To evaluate the effect of parental ADHD and SUD, the offspring were stratified into four groups based on parental status: children of parents with neither ADHD nor SUD, children of parents with SUD only, children of parents with ADHD only, and children of parents with both ADHD and SUD. Using generalized estimating equation models, parental SUD and ADHD were used to predict ADHD in the offspring. The rate of children with ADHD increased among children of parents with neither disorder (3%), children of parents with SUD (13%), children of parents with ADHD (25%), and children of parents with both ADHD and SUD (50%) (p ¼ :001). Children of parents with ADHD or ADHD plus SUD were more likely to have ADHD in comparison to children of parents with neither diagnosis (p < 0:05). Children of parents with ADHD plus SUD were at greater risk of ADHD in comparison to children of parents with SUD only (p ¼ 0:01). Despite the small sample size, the results of this study seem to suggest that the offspring of SUD or ADHD parents are at elevated risk for ADHD compared to controls. The offspring of parents with both ADHD and SUD appear to be at the highest risk for ADHD, highlighting the need for careful screening of this group of youth for ADHD. Replication studies clarifying the nature and strength of the association are necessary.
    • Informativeness of Self-Reports of ADHD Symptoms in Monitoring Response to Stimulant Treatment in Clinically Referred Adults With ADHD

      Biederman, Joseph; Fitzgerald, Maura; Spencer, Thomas J.; Adler, Lenard A.; Abrams, Jessica; Biederman, Itai; Faraone, Stephen V. (SAGE Publications, 2018-05-26)
      To investigate the informativeness of self-reports of ADHD symptoms in adults with ADHD in the clinical setting. Method: Subjects were clinically referred adults aged 19 years to 67 years of age of both sexes (N = 54). All subjects were on stable doses of stimulant and were considered responders to treatment. ADHD symptoms were assessed using the ADHD Investigator Symptom Rating Scale (AISRS) and the ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS). Spearman’s rank correlations were used to assess the correlations between clinician-assessed ADHD and patients’ self-reports. Results: Spearman’s rank correlation analysis found evidence of a strong, positive association between total scores on the AISRS and the ASRS (rs = .65, df = 52, p < .001). Conclusion: Results have important implications for the management and monitoring of treatment response in the clinical setting through patients’ self-report.(J. of Att. Dis. 2020; 24(3) 420-424)
    • Investigation of parent-of-origin effects in ADHD candidate genes

      Kim, Jang Woo; Waldman, Irwin D.; Faraone, Stephen V.; Biederman, Joseph; Doyle, Alysa E.; Purcell, Shaun; Arbeitman, Lori; Fagerness, Jesen; Sklar, Pamela; Smoller, Jordan W. (Wiley, 2007)
    • Laboratory-Observed Behavioral Disinhibition in the Young Offspring of Parents With Bipolar Disorder: A High-Risk Pilot Study

      Hirshfeld-Becker, Dina R.; Biederman, Joseph; Henin, Aude; Faraone, Stephen V.; Cayton, Gabrielle A.; Rosenbaum, Jerrold F. (American Psychiatric Association Publishing, 2006-02)
      Objective: This study tested whether behavioral disinhibition is more prevalent among offspring of parents with bipolar disorder than among offspring of parents without bipolar disorder. Method: The authors conducted a secondary analysis of data from a preexisting high-risk study of offspring at risk for panic disorder and depression (N=278) that had included some children with parents who had bipolar disorder (N=34). Children (ages 2–6) had been classified as behaviorally inhibited, disinhibited, or neither in laboratory assessments. Results: Offspring of bipolar parents had significantly higher rates of behavioral disinhibition than offspring of parents without bipolar disorder. Behavioral inhibition did not differ between groups. Differences were not accounted for by parental panic disorder or major depression or by parental history of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, conduct disorder, antisocial personality, or substance use disorders. Conclusions: Results suggest a familial link between bipolar disorder in parents and behavioral disinhibition in their offspring. Behavioral disinhibition may be a familially transmitted predisposing factor for dysregulatory distress later in life.
    • Lack of Association Between Behavioral Inhibition and Psychosocial Adversity Factors in Children at Risk for Anxiety Disorders

      Hirshfeld-Becker, Dina R.; Biederman, Joseph; Faraone, Stephen V.; Segool, Natasha; Buchwald, Jennifer; Rosenbaum, Jerrold F. (American Psychiatric Association Publishing, 2004-03)
      Objective: In a previous controlled study of offspring at risk for anxiety disorders, the authors found that parental panic disorder with comorbid major depression was associated with child behavioral inhibition, the temperamental tendency to be quiet and restrained in unfamiliar situations. To explore whether this association was mediated by environmental factors, the authors examined associations between psychosocial adversity variables and behavioral inhibition in this group of children. Method: Subjects included 200 offspring of parents with panic disorder and/or major depression and 84 comparison children of parents without mood or anxiety disorders. Behavioral inhibition was assessed through laboratory observations. The associations between behavioral inhibition and the following psychosocial factors were examined: socioeconomic status; an index of adversity factors found in previous studies to be additively associated with child psychopathology; family intactness, conflict, expressiveness, and cohesiveness; exposure to parental psychopathology; sibship size; birth order; and gender. Results: The results showed no associations between behavioral inhibition and any of the psychosocial factors in the study group as a whole, despite adequate power to detect medium effect sizes. Among low-risk comparison children only, some definitions of behavioral inhibition were associated with low socioeconomic status, low family cohesion, and female gender. Conclusions: The results suggest that the psychosocial adversity factors examined in this study do not explain the previous finding that offspring of parents with panic disorder are at high risk for behavioral inhibition.
    • Lack of Association Between Parental Alcohol or Drug Addiction and Behavioral Inhibition in Children

      Biederman, Joseph; Hirshfeld-Becker, Dina R.; Rosenbaum, Jerrold F.; Perenick, Sarah G.; Wood, Julia; Faraone, Stephen V. (American Psychiatric Association Publishing, 2001-10)
      Objective: “Behavioral inhibition to the unfamiliar” has been proposed as a precursor to anxiety. A recent study proposed that it may also be a precursor to alcoholism. The authors sought to replicate the latter finding through a secondary analysis of data from a large study of young children (age 2–6 years)—offspring of parents with panic and depressive disorders—who had been assessed for behavioral inhibition through laboratory-based observations. Method: The offspring were stratified on the basis of presence or absence of parental lifetime history of DSM-III-R alcohol dependence (N=115 versus N=166, respectively) or drug dependence (N=78 versus N=203). The rates of behavioral inhibition were then compared between groups. Results: Despite adequate power to detect associations, neither parental alcohol dependence nor drug dependence was associated with a higher risk for behavioral inhibition in the offspring. Conclusions: These results are not consistent with the hypothesis linking behavioral inhibition to addictions
    • Linkage of chromosome 13q32 to schizophrenia in a large veterans affairs cooperative study sample

      Faraone, Stephen V.; Skol, Andrew D.; Tsuang, Debby W.; Bingham, Stephen; Young, Keith A.; Prabhudesai, Sarita; Haverstock, Susan L.; Mena, Felicitas; Menon, Aerath Sri Kumar; Bisset, Darren; et al. (Wiley, 2002-07-29)
      Several prior reports have suggested that chromosomal region 13q32 may harbor a schizophrenia susceptibility gene. In an attempt to replicate this finding, we assessed linkage between chromosome 13 markers and schizophrenia in 166 families, each with two or more affected members. The families, assembled from multiple centers by the Department of Veterans Affairs Cooperative Studies Program, included 392 sampled affected subjects and 216 affected sib pairs. By DSM-III-R criteria, 360 subjects (91.8%) had a diagnosis of schizophrenia and 32 (8.2%) were classified as schizoaffective disorder, depressed. The families had mixed ethnic backgrounds. The majority were northern European-American families (n = 62, 37%), but a substantial proportion were African-American kindreds (n = 60, 36%). Chromosome 13 markers, spaced at intervals of approximately 10 cM over the entire chromosome and 2-5 cM for the 13q32 region were genotyped and the data analyzed using semi-parametric affected only linkage analysis. For the combined sample (with race broadly defined and schizophrenia narrowly defined) the maximum LOD score was 1.43 (Z-score of 2.57; P = 0.01) at 79.0 cM between markers D13S1241 (76.3 cM) and D13S159 (79.5 cM). Both ethnic groups showed a peak in this region. The peak is within 3 cM of the peak reported by Brzustowicz et al.
    • Long-term outcome of pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder: a meta-analysis and qualitative review of the literature

      Stewart, S. E.; Geller, D. A.; Jenike, M.; Pauls, D.; Shaw, D.; Mullin, B.; Faraone, Stephen V. (Wiley, 2004-07)
      Objective: To review the extant literature on the long-term outcome of child/adolescent-onset obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD). Method: Medline and Psychlit databases were systematically searched for articles regarding long-term outcomes of child/adolescent-onset OCD. Meta-analysis regression was applied to evaluate predictors and persistence of OCD. Results: Sixteen study samples (n ¼ 6–132; total ¼ 521 participants) in 22 studies had follow-up periods ranging between 1 and 15.6 years. Pooled mean persistence rates were 41% for full OCD and 60% for full or subthreshold OCD. Earlier age of OCD onset (z ¼ )3.26, P ¼ 0.001), increased OCD duration (z ¼ 2.22, P ¼ 0.027) and inpatient vs. out-patient status (z ¼ 2.94, P ¼ 0.003) predicted greater persistence. Comorbid psychiatric illness and poor initial treatment response were poor prognostic factors. Although psychosocial function was frequently compromised, most studies lacked comprehensive outcome measures. Conclusion: Long-term persistence of pediatric OCD may be lower than believed. Future studies should include broader measures of outcome including symptomatic persistence and functional impairment in multiple domains.