• Report from the second international meeting of the attention deficit hyperactivity disorder Molecular Genetics Network

      Faraone, Stephen V. (Wiley, 2001)
      Given evidence from twin, family, and adoption studies of genetic influence on attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), a growing number of researchers have initiated molecular genetics studies to explore the influence of specific genes on this condition. In 1999, these investigators convened to discuss ways of sharing information and facilitating collaborations across research sites. Enthusiastic response to this first conference prompted an even larger group of investigators to come together this year. This recent meeting, held in London, began with a presentation of Hypescheme, an operational criteria checklist developed in an effort to promote the reliable communication of diagnostic and other relevant clinical information related to ADHD. The benefits and limitations of Hypescheme, as well as the continued challenges to collaboration, were discussed. A new ADHD-specific rating scale, developed to be of use in genetic analyses, was also presented. Focus then turned to collaborative projects proposed by investigators and practical suggestions regarding joint data analyses projects. Finally, new data from individual sites were presented. Because the mode of inheritance of ADHD is likely to be complex, efforts to collaborate and cross-validate findings remain an important priority for researchers studying the molecular genetics of this disorder. © 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
    • Revisiting the factor structure for positive and negative symptoms: evidence from a large heterogeneous group of psychiatric patients

      Toomey, R; Kremen, W S; simpson, J C; Samson, J A; Seidman, L J; Lynons, M J; Faraone, S V; Tsuang, M T (American Psychiatric Association Publishing, 1997-03)
      O bjective: The factor structures of individual positive and negative symptoms as well as global ratings were examined in a diagnostically heterogeneous group of subjects. Method: Subjects were identified through a clinical and family study of patients with major psychoses at a VA medical center and evaluated with the Scale for the Assessment of N egative Symptoms and the Scale for the Assessment of Positive Symptoms. For the examination of global-level factor structures (N =630), both principal-component analysis and factor analysis with orthogonal rotation were used. Factor analysis was used for the examination of item-level factor structures as well (N =549). Results: The principal-component analysis of global ratings revealed three factors: negative symptoms, positive symptoms, and disorganization. The factor analysis of global ratings revealed a negative symptom factor and a positive symptom factor. The itemlevel factor analysis revealed two negative symptom factors (diminished expression and disordered relating), two positive symptom factors (bizarre delusions and auditory hallucinations), and a disorganization factor. Conclusions: The generation of additional meaningful factors at the item level suggests that important information about symptoms is lost when only global ratings are viewed. Future work should explore clinical and pathological correlates of the more differentiated item-level symptom dimensions
    • Risk variants and polygenic architecture of disruptive behavior disorders in the context of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

      Demontis, Ditte; Walters, Raymond K.; Rajagopal, Veera M.; Waldman, Irwin D.; Grove, Jakob; Als, Thomas D.; Dalsgaard, Søren; Ribasés, Marta; Bybjerg-Grauholm, Jonas; Bækvad-Hansen, Maria; et al. (Springer Science and Business Media LLC, 2021-01-25)
      Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a childhood psychiatric disorder often comorbid with disruptive behavior disorders (DBDs). Here, we report a GWAS meta-analysis of ADHD comorbid with DBDs (ADHD + DBDs) including 3802 cases and 31,305 controls. We identify three genome-wide significant loci on chromosomes 1, 7, and 11. A meta-analysis including a Chinese cohort supports that the locus on chromosome 11 is a strong risk locus for ADHD + DBDs across European and Chinese ancestries (rs7118422, P = 3.15×10-10, OR = 1.17). We find a higher SNP heritability for ADHD + DBDs (h2SNP = 0.34) when compared to ADHD without DBDs (h2SNP = 0.20), high genetic correlations between ADHD + DBDs and aggressive (rg = 0.81) and anti-social behaviors (rg = 0.82), and an increased burden (polygenic score) of variants associated with ADHD and aggression in ADHD + DBDs compared to ADHD without DBDs. Our results suggest an increased load of common risk variants in ADHD + DBDs compared to ADHD without DBDs, which in part can be explained by variants associated with aggressive behavior.
    • Risk variants and polygenic architecture of disruptive behavior disorders in the context of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

      Demontis, Ditte; Walters, Raymond K.; Rajagopal, Veera M.; Waldman, Irwin D.; Grove, Jakob; Als, Thomas D.; Dalsgaard, Søren; Ribasés, Marta; Bybjerg-Grauholm, Jonas; Bækvad-Hansen, Maria; et al. (Springer Science and Business Media LLC, 2021-01-25)
      Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a childhood psychiatric disorder often comorbid with disruptive behavior disorders (DBDs). Here, we report a GWAS meta-analysis of ADHD comorbid with DBDs (ADHD + DBDs) including 3802 cases and 31,305 controls. We identify three genome-wide significant loci on chromosomes 1, 7, and 11. A meta-analysis including a Chinese cohort supports that the locus on chromosome 11 is a strong risk locus for ADHD + DBDs across European and Chinese ancestries (rs7118422, P = 3.15×10−10, OR= 1.17). We find a higher SNP heritability for ADHD + DBDs (h2 SNP = 0.34) when compared to ADHD without DBDs (h2 SNP = 0.20), high genetic correlations between ADHD + DBDs and aggressive (rg = 0.81) and anti-social behaviors (rg = 0.82), and an increased burden (polygenic score) of variants associated with ADHD and aggression in ADHD + DBDs compared to ADHD without DBDs. Our results suggest an increased load of common risk variants in ADHD + DBDs compared to ADHD without DBDs, which in part can be explained by variants associated with aggressive behavior.
    • Separating Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and Learning Disabilities in Girls: A Familial Risk Analysis

      Doyle, Alysa E.; Faraone, Stephen V.; DuPre, Emily P.; Biederman, Joseph (American Psychiatric Association Publishing, 2001-10)
      Objective: Familial risk analysis was used to clarify the relationship in girls between attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and learning disabilities in either mathematics or reading. Method: The authors assessed the presence of ADHD and learning disabilities in 679 first-degree relatives of three groups of index children: girls with ADHD and a comorbid learning disability, girls with ADHD but no learning disabilities, and a comparison group of girls without ADHD. Results: The risk for ADHD was similarly higher in families of ADHD probands with and without learning disabilities; both groups had significantly higher rates of ADHD than did families of the comparison girls. In contrast, only among relatives of ADHD probands with a learning disability was there a higher risk for learning disabilities. A strong (although statistically nonsignificant) difference emerged that suggested at least some degree of cosegregation of ADHD and learning disabilities in family members. There was no evidence of nonrandom mating between spouses with ADHD and learning disabilities. Conclusions: These results extend previously reported findings regarding the relationship of ADHD and learning disabilities to female subjects and raise the possibility that, in girls, the relationship between ADHD and learning disabilities is due to shared familial risk factors.
    • A seq2seq model to forecast the COVID-19 cases, deaths and reproductive R numbers in US counties

      Zhang-James, Yanli; Hess, Jonathan; Salekin, Asif; Wang, Dongliang; Chen, Samuel; Winkelstein, Peter; Morley, Christopher P; Faraone, Stephen V (Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, 2021-04-20)
      The global pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has killed almost two million people worldwide and over 400 thousand in the United States (US). As the pandemic evolves, informed policy-making and strategic resource allocation relies on accurate forecasts. To predict the spread of the virus within US counties, we curated an array of county-level demographic and COVID-19-relevant health risk factors. In combination with the county-level case and death numbers curated by John Hopkins university, we developed a forecasting model using deep learning (DL). We implemented an autoencoder-based Seq2Seq model with gated recurrent units (GRUs) in the deep recurrent layers. We trained the model to predict future incident cases, deaths and the reproductive number, R. For most counties, it makes accurate predictions of new incident cases, deaths and R values, up to 30 days in the future. Our framework can also be used to predict other targets that are useful indices for policymaking, for example hospitalization or the occupancy of intensive care units. Our DL framework is publicly available on GitHub and can be adapted for other indices of the COVID-19 spread. We hope that our forecasts and model can help local governments in the continued fight against COVID-19.
    • Shared polygenic risk for ADHD, executive dysfunction and other psychiatric disorders

      Chang, Suhua; Yang, Li; Wang, Yufeng; Faraone, Stephen V. (Springer Science and Business Media LLC, 2020-06-09)
      Many psychiatric disorders are associated with impaired executive functioning (EF). The associated EF component varies by psychiatric disorders, and this variation might be due to genetic liability. We explored the genetic association between five psychiatric disorders and EF in clinically-recruited attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) children using polygenic risk score (PRS) methodology. Genome-wide association study (GWAS) summary data for ADHD, major depressive disorder (MDD), schizophrenia (SZ), bipolar disorder (BIP) and autism were used to calculate the PRSs. EF was evaluated by the Stroop test for inhibitory control, the trail-making test for cognitive flexibility, and the digital span test for working memory in a Chinese ADHD cohort (n = 1147). Exploratory factor analysis of the three measures identified one principal component for EF (EF-PC). Linear regression models were used to analyze the association between each PRS and the EF measures. The role of EF measures in mediating the effects of the PRSs on ADHD symptoms was also analyzed. The result showed the PRSs for MDD, ADHD and BIP were all significantly associated with the EF-PC. For each EF component, the association results were different for the PRSs of the five psychiatric disorders: the PRSs for ADHD and MDD were associated with inhibitory control (adjusted P = 0.0183 and 0.0313, respectively), the PRS for BIP was associated with working memory (adjusted P = 0.0416), and the PRS for SZ was associated with cognitive flexibility (adjusted P = 0.0335). All three EF measures were significantly correlated with ADHD symptoms. In mediation analyses, the ADHD and MDD PRSs, which were associated with inhibitory control, had significant indirect effects on ADHD symptoms through the mediation of inhibitory control. These findings indicate that the polygenic risks for several psychiatric disorders influence specific executive dysfunction in children with ADHD. The results helped to clarify the relationship between risk genes of each mental disorder and the intermediate cognitive domain, which may further help elucidate the risk genes and motivate efforts to develop EF measures as a diagnostic marker and future treatment target.
    • Six-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of desipramine for adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

      Wilen, T E; Biederman, J; Prince, J; spencer, T J; Faraone, S V; Warburton, R; Schleifer, D; Harding, M; Linehan, C; Geller, D (American Psychiatric Association Publishing, 1996-09)
      O bjective: The factor structures of individual positive and negative symptoms as well as global ratings were examined in a diagnostically heterogeneous group of subjects. Method: Subjects were identified through a clinical and family study of patients with major psychoses at a VA medical center and evaluated with the Scale for the Assessment of N egative Symptoms and the Scale for the Assessment of Positive Symptoms. For the examination of global-level factor structures (N =630), both principal-component analysis and factor analysis with orthogonal rotation were used. Factor analysis was used for the examination of item-level factor structures as well (N =549). Results: The principal-component analysis of global ratings revealed three factors: negative symptoms, positive symptoms, and disorganization. The factor analysis of global ratings revealed a negative symptom factor and a positive symptom factor. The itemlevel factor analysis revealed two negative symptom factors (diminished expression and disordered relating), two positive symptom factors (bizarre delusions and auditory hallucinations), and a disorganization factor. Conclusions: The generation of additional meaningful factors at the item level suggests that important information about symptoms is lost when only global ratings are viewed. Future work should explore clinical and pathological correlates of the more differentiated item-level symptom dimensions
    • Sodium hydrogen exchanger 9 NHE9 ( SLC9A9 ) and its emerging roles in neuropsychiatric comorbidity

      Patak, Jameson; Faraone, Stephen V.; Zhang‐James, Yanli (Wiley, 2020-05-13)
      Variations in SLC9A9 gene expression and protein function are associated with multiple human diseases, which range from Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) to glioblastoma multiforme. In an effort to determine the full spectrum of human disease associations with SLC9A9, we performed a systematic review of the literature. We also review SLC9A9's biochemistry, protein structure, and function, as well as its interacting partners with the goal of identifying mechanisms of disease and druggable targets. We report gaps in the literature regarding the genes function along with consistent trends in disease associations that can be used to further research into treating the respective diseases. We report that SLC9A9 has strong associations with neuropsychiatric diseases and various cancers. Interestingly, we find strong overlap in SLC9A9 disease associations and propose a novel role for SLC9A9 in neuropsychiatric comorbidity. In conclusion, SLC9A9 is a multifunctional protein that, through both its endosome regulatory function and its protein–protein interaction network, has the ability to modulate signaling axes, such as the PI3K pathway, among others.
    • Stability of executive function deficits into young adult years: a prospective longitudinal follow-up study of grown up males with ADHD

      Biederman, J.; Petty, C. R.; Fried, R.; Doyle, A. E.; Spencer, T.; Seidman, L. J.; Gross, L.; Poetzl, K.; Faraone, S. V. (Wiley, 2007-08)
      Objective: Although individuals with attention deficit‐hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) commonly exhibit deficits in executive functions that greatly increase the morbidity of the disorder, all available information on the subject is cross sectional. Method: Males (n = 85) 9–22 years with ADHD followed over 7 years into young adulthood were assessed on measures of sustained attention/vigilance, planning and organization, response inhibition, set shifting and categorization, selective attention and visual scanning, verbal and visual learning, and memory. A binary definition of executive function deficits (EFDs) was defined based on a subject manifesting at least two abnormal tests 1.5 standard deviations from controls. Results: The majority of subjects maintained EFDs over time (kappa: 0.41, P < 0.001; sensitivity: 55%, specificity: 85%, positive predictive value: 69%, and negative predictive value: 75%). Conclusion: Considering the morbidity of EFDs, these findings stress the importance of their early recognition for prevention and early intervention strategies. EFDs are stable over time.
    • Structural Brain Imaging Studies Offer Clues about the Effects of the Shared Genetic Etiology among Neuropsychiatric Disorders

      Radonjić, Nevena V.; Hess, Jonathan L.; Rovira, Paula; Andreassen, Ole; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Ching, Christopher R. K.; Franke, Barbara; Hoogman, Martine; Jahanshad, Neda; McDonald, Carrie; et al. (Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, 2019-10-17)
      Genomewide association studies have found significant genetic correlations among many neuropsychiatric disorders. In contrast, we know much less about the degree to which structural brain alterations are similar among disorders and, if so, the degree to which such similarities have a genetic etiology. From the Enhancing Neuroimaging Genetics through Meta- Analysis (ENIGMA) consortium, we acquired standardized mean differences (SMDs) in regional brain volume and cortical thickness between cases and controls. We had data on 41 brain regions for: attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism spectrum disorder (ASD), bipolar disorder (BD), epilepsy, major depressive disorder (MDD), obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), and schizophrenia (SCZ). These data had been derived from 24,360 patients and 37,425 controls. The SMDs were significantly correlated between SCZ and BD, OCD, MDD, and ASD. MDD was positively correlated with BD and OCD. BD was positively correlated with OCD and negatively correlated with ADHD. These pairwise correlations among disorders were correlated with the corresponding pairwise correlations among disorders derived from genomewide association studies (r = 0.494). Our results show substantial similarities in sMRI phenotypes among neuropsychiatric disorders and suggest that these similarities are accounted for, in part, by corresponding similarities in common genetic variant architectures.
    • Substance Use among ADHD Adults: Implications of Late Onset and Subthreshold Diagnoses

      Faraone, Stephen V.; Wilens, Timothy E.; Petty, Carter; Antshel, Kevin; Spencer, Thomas; Biederman, Joseph (Wiley, 2007-01)
      Diagnosing ADHD in adults is difficult when the diagnostician cannot establish an onset prior to the DSM-IV criterion of age seven or if the number of symptoms does not achieve the DSM threshold for diagnosis. These diagnostic issues are an even larger concern for clinicians faced with adults with substance use disorders (SUD). The present study compared four groups of adults: full ADHD subjects who met all DSM-IV criteria for childhood onset ADHD, late onset ADHD subjects who met all criteria except the age at onset criterion, subthreshold ADHD subjects who did not meet full symptom criteria, and nonADHD subjects who did not meet any of the above criteria. Diagnoses were by the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV, and the Drug Use Severity Index (DUSI) was used for self-report of substance use. Cigarette and marijuana use was significantly greater in all ADHD groups relative to non-ADHD controls. Although usage rates of other drugs failed to reach significance, the ADHD groups were more likely to have used each drug (except alcohol) compared with the non-ADHD group. The late onset and full ADHD groups were more likely to have endorsed ever having a problem due to use of cigarettes, alcohol, or marijuana and reported more trouble resisting use of drugs or alcohol. The full ADHD group was more likely than the other groups to have reported ‘‘getting high’’ as their reason for using their preferred drug. Adults with ADHD have elevated rates of substance use and related impairment. Data about late onset ADHD provides further support for the idea that the DSM-IV age at onset criterion is too stringent. In contrast, subthreshold ADHD seems to be a milder form of the disorder, or perhaps a heterogeneous group of true ADHD cases and false positives.
    • Substance Use Disorders in High-Risk Adolescent Offspring

      Milberger, Stephen V. Faraone, Jose, Sharon (Wiley, 1999-01)
      Objective: To examine the risk for substance use disorders (SUD) in offspring of SUD parents who were not selected due to referral to SUD treatment centers. Method: The original sample was ascertained through two groups of index children: 140 ADHD probands and 120 non-ADHD comparison probands. These groups had 174 and 129 biological siblings and 279 and 240 parents, respectively. Results: We found that: 1) parental SUD was associated with SUD and all SUD subtypes in the offspring; 2) parental alcohol use disorders were associated with alcohol use disorders in the offspring as well as co-occurring alcohol and drug use disorders but not drug use disorders alone in the offspring; and 3) drug use disorders in the parents were associated with drug use disorders but not alcohol use disorders in the offspring. Conclusions: These findings suggest that alcoholism and drug abuse may breed true from parents to their offspring, but further work with larger samples is needed to confirm this idea. Our findings also suggest a possible common diathesis that is expressed as comorbid alcohol and drug use in the offspring of alcoholic parents. If confirmed, these findings may be useful for the development of preventive and early intervention strategies for adolescents at high risk for SUD based on parental history of SUD.
    • Transcriptome-wide gene expression in a rat model of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder symptoms: Rats developmentally exposed to polychlorinated biphenyls

      Sazonova, Nadezhda A.; DasBanerjee, Tania; Middleton, Frank A.; Gowtham, Sriharsha; Schuckers, Stephanie; Faraone, Stephen V. (Wiley, 2011-09-14)
      Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) exposure in rodents provides a useful model for the symptoms of Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The goal of this study is to identify genes whose expression levels are altered in response to PCB exposure. The brains from 48 rats separated into two age groups of 24 animals each (4 males and 4 females for each PCB exposure level (control, PCB utero, and PCB lactational)) were harvested at postnatal days 23 and 35, respectively. The RNA was isolated from three brain regions of interest and was analyzed for differences in expression of a set of 27,342 transcripts. Two hundred seventy-nine transcripts showed significant differential expression due to PCB exposure mostly due to the difference between PCB lactational and control groups. The cluster analysis applied to these transcripts revealed that significant changes in gene expression levels in PFC area due to PCB lactational exposure. Our pathway analyses implicated 27 significant canonical pathways and 38 significant functional pathways. Our transcriptomewide analysis of the effects of PCB exposure shows that the expression of many genes is dysregulated by lactational PCB exposure, but not gestational exposure and has highlighted biological pathways that might mediate the effects of PCB exposure on ADHD-like behaviors seen in exposed animals. Our work should further motivate studies of fatty acids in ADHD, and further suggests that another potentially druggable pathway, oxidative stress,may play a role in PCB inducedADHD behaviors
    • Traumatic Brain Injury and Schizophrenia in Members of Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder Pedigrees

      Malaspina, Dolores; Goetz, Raymond R.; Friedman, Jill Harkavy; Kaufmann, Charles A.; Faraone, Stephen V.; Tsuang, Ming; Cloninger, C. Robert; Nurnberger, John I.; Blehar, Mary C. (American Psychiatric Association Publishing, 2001-03)
      Objective: Schizophrenia following a traumatic brain injury could be a phenocopy of genetic schizophrenia or the consequence of a gene-environment interaction. Alternatively, traumatic brain injury and schizophrenia could be spuriously associated if those who are predisposed to develop schizophrenia have greater amounts of trauma for other reasons. The authors investigated the relationship between traumatic brain injury and psychiatric diagnoses in a large group of subjects from families with at least two biologically related first-degree relatives with schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, or bipolar disorder. Method: The Diagnostic Interview for Genetic Studies was used to determine history of traumatic brain injury and diagnosis for 1,275 members of multiplex bipolar disorder pedigrees and 565 members of multiplex schizophrenia pedigrees. Results: Rates of traumatic brain injury were significantly higher for those with a diagnosis of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and depression than for those with no mental illness. However, multivariate analysis of within-pedigree data showed that mental illness was related to traumatic brain injury only in the schizophrenia pedigrees. Independent of diagnoses, family members of those with schizophrenia were more likely to have had traumatic brain injury than were members of the bipolar disorder pedigrees. The members of the schizophrenia pedigrees also failed to show the gender difference for traumatic brain injury (more common in men than in women) that was expected and was present in the bipolar disorder pedigrees. Subjects with a schizophrenia diagnosis who were members of the bipolar disorder pedigrees (and thus had less genetic vulnerability to schizophrenia) were less likely to have had traumatic brain injury (4.5%) than were subjects with schizophrenia who were members of the schizophrenia pedigrees (and who had greater genetic vulnerability to schizophrenia) (19.6%). Conclusions: Members of the schizophrenia pedigrees, even those without a schizophrenia diagnosis, had greater exposure to traumatic brain injury compared to members of the bipolar disorder pedigrees. Within the schizophrenia pedigrees, traumatic brain injury was associated with a greater risk of schizophrenia, consistent with synergistic effects between genetic vulnerability for schizophrenia and traumatic brain injury. Posttraumatic-braininjury schizophrenia in multiplex schizophrenia pedigrees does not appear to be a phenocopy of the genetic disorder.
    • Treatment of nonpsychotic relatives of patients with schizophrenia: Six case studies

      Tsuang, Ming T.; Stone, William S.; Tarbox, Sarah I.; Faraone, Stephen V. (Wiley, 2002-11-27)
      There is growing support for the notion that the genetic liability for schizophrenia could be manifested in brain dysfunction, even without the full manifestations of schizophrenia [Meehl, 1962, 1989; Seidman, 1997; Faraone et al., 2001]. This liability is characterized clinically by neurologic, neurobiological, psychiatric, neuropsychological, and psychosocial impairments in nonpsychotic, first-degree relatives of people with schizophrenia and includes eye tracking dysfunction [Levy et al., 1994], allusive thinking [Catts et al., 1993], neurologic signs [Erlenmeyer-Kimling et al., 1982], biochemical abnormalities [Callicott et al., 1998], char acteristic auditory evoked potentials [Friedman and Squires-Wheeler, 1994], neuroimaging assessed brain abnormalities [Seidman et al., 1997], and neuropsycho logical impairment [Kremen et al., 1994]. Paul Meehl introduced the term ‘‘schizotaxia’’ in 1962 to describe the genetic predisposition to schizophrenia [Meehl, 1962], and we have modified the concept to take account of subsequent research [Faraone et al., 2000]. The concept of schizotaxia raises at least three fundamental issues: 1) What is the conceptual basis of schizotaxia? 2) Is it a valid syndrome? and 3) perhaps most importantly from the point of view of the eventual prevention of schizo phrenia, is it treatable? In this paper, we review the model of schizotaxia by focusing first on its nature and extent. We then describe preliminary research criteria for its diagnosis in nonpsychotic relatives of schizo phrenic patients, followed by a presentation of our initial attempts to treat schizotaxia. Finally, prospects for the future focus on the need to validate the proposed syndrome further and on the clinical implications of treating schizotaxia.