• Laboratory-Observed Behavioral Disinhibition in the Young Offspring of Parents With Bipolar Disorder: A High-Risk Pilot Study

      Hirshfeld-Becker, Dina R.; Biederman, Joseph; Henin, Aude; Faraone, Stephen V.; Cayton, Gabrielle A.; Rosenbaum, Jerrold F. (American Psychiatric Association Publishing, 2006-02)
      Objective: This study tested whether behavioral disinhibition is more prevalent among offspring of parents with bipolar disorder than among offspring of parents without bipolar disorder. Method: The authors conducted a secondary analysis of data from a preexisting high-risk study of offspring at risk for panic disorder and depression (N=278) that had included some children with parents who had bipolar disorder (N=34). Children (ages 2–6) had been classified as behaviorally inhibited, disinhibited, or neither in laboratory assessments. Results: Offspring of bipolar parents had significantly higher rates of behavioral disinhibition than offspring of parents without bipolar disorder. Behavioral inhibition did not differ between groups. Differences were not accounted for by parental panic disorder or major depression or by parental history of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, conduct disorder, antisocial personality, or substance use disorders. Conclusions: Results suggest a familial link between bipolar disorder in parents and behavioral disinhibition in their offspring. Behavioral disinhibition may be a familially transmitted predisposing factor for dysregulatory distress later in life.
    • Lack of Association Between Behavioral Inhibition and Psychosocial Adversity Factors in Children at Risk for Anxiety Disorders

      Hirshfeld-Becker, Dina R.; Biederman, Joseph; Faraone, Stephen V.; Segool, Natasha; Buchwald, Jennifer; Rosenbaum, Jerrold F. (American Psychiatric Association Publishing, 2004-03)
      Objective: In a previous controlled study of offspring at risk for anxiety disorders, the authors found that parental panic disorder with comorbid major depression was associated with child behavioral inhibition, the temperamental tendency to be quiet and restrained in unfamiliar situations. To explore whether this association was mediated by environmental factors, the authors examined associations between psychosocial adversity variables and behavioral inhibition in this group of children. Method: Subjects included 200 offspring of parents with panic disorder and/or major depression and 84 comparison children of parents without mood or anxiety disorders. Behavioral inhibition was assessed through laboratory observations. The associations between behavioral inhibition and the following psychosocial factors were examined: socioeconomic status; an index of adversity factors found in previous studies to be additively associated with child psychopathology; family intactness, conflict, expressiveness, and cohesiveness; exposure to parental psychopathology; sibship size; birth order; and gender. Results: The results showed no associations between behavioral inhibition and any of the psychosocial factors in the study group as a whole, despite adequate power to detect medium effect sizes. Among low-risk comparison children only, some definitions of behavioral inhibition were associated with low socioeconomic status, low family cohesion, and female gender. Conclusions: The results suggest that the psychosocial adversity factors examined in this study do not explain the previous finding that offspring of parents with panic disorder are at high risk for behavioral inhibition.
    • Lack of Association Between Parental Alcohol or Drug Addiction and Behavioral Inhibition in Children

      Biederman, Joseph; Hirshfeld-Becker, Dina R.; Rosenbaum, Jerrold F.; Perenick, Sarah G.; Wood, Julia; Faraone, Stephen V. (American Psychiatric Association Publishing, 2001-10)
      Objective: “Behavioral inhibition to the unfamiliar” has been proposed as a precursor to anxiety. A recent study proposed that it may also be a precursor to alcoholism. The authors sought to replicate the latter finding through a secondary analysis of data from a large study of young children (age 2–6 years)—offspring of parents with panic and depressive disorders—who had been assessed for behavioral inhibition through laboratory-based observations. Method: The offspring were stratified on the basis of presence or absence of parental lifetime history of DSM-III-R alcohol dependence (N=115 versus N=166, respectively) or drug dependence (N=78 versus N=203). The rates of behavioral inhibition were then compared between groups. Results: Despite adequate power to detect associations, neither parental alcohol dependence nor drug dependence was associated with a higher risk for behavioral inhibition in the offspring. Conclusions: These results are not consistent with the hypothesis linking behavioral inhibition to addictions
    • Linkage of chromosome 13q32 to schizophrenia in a large veterans affairs cooperative study sample

      Faraone, Stephen V.; Skol, Andrew D.; Tsuang, Debby W.; Bingham, Stephen; Young, Keith A.; Prabhudesai, Sarita; Haverstock, Susan L.; Mena, Felicitas; Menon, Aerath Sri Kumar; Bisset, Darren; et al. (Wiley, 2002-07-29)
      Several prior reports have suggested that chromosomal region 13q32 may harbor a schizophrenia susceptibility gene. In an attempt to replicate this finding, we assessed linkage between chromosome 13 markers and schizophrenia in 166 families, each with two or more affected members. The families, assembled from multiple centers by the Department of Veterans Affairs Cooperative Studies Program, included 392 sampled affected subjects and 216 affected sib pairs. By DSM-III-R criteria, 360 subjects (91.8%) had a diagnosis of schizophrenia and 32 (8.2%) were classified as schizoaffective disorder, depressed. The families had mixed ethnic backgrounds. The majority were northern European-American families (n = 62, 37%), but a substantial proportion were African-American kindreds (n = 60, 36%). Chromosome 13 markers, spaced at intervals of approximately 10 cM over the entire chromosome and 2-5 cM for the 13q32 region were genotyped and the data analyzed using semi-parametric affected only linkage analysis. For the combined sample (with race broadly defined and schizophrenia narrowly defined) the maximum LOD score was 1.43 (Z-score of 2.57; P = 0.01) at 79.0 cM between markers D13S1241 (76.3 cM) and D13S159 (79.5 cM). Both ethnic groups showed a peak in this region. The peak is within 3 cM of the peak reported by Brzustowicz et al.
    • Linkage of chromosome 13q32 to schizophrenia in a large veterans affairs cooperative study sample

      Faraone, Stephen V.; Skol, Andrew D.; Tsuang, Debby W.; Bingham, Stephen; Young, Keith A.; Prabhudesai, Sarita; Haverstock, Susan L.; Mena, Felicitas; Menon, Aerath Sri Kumar; Bisset, Darren; et al. (Wiley, 2002-07-29)
      Several prior reports have suggested that chromosomal region 13q32 may harbor a schizophrenia susceptibility gene. In an attempt to replicate this finding, we assessed linkage between chromosome 13 markers and schizophrenia in 166 families, each with two or more affected members. The families, assembled from multiple centers by the Department of Veterans Affairs Cooperative Studies Program, included 392 sampled affected subjects and 216 affected sib pairs. By DSM-III-R criteria, 360 subjects (91.8%) had a diagnosis of schizophrenia and 32 (8.2%) were classified as schizoaffective disorder, depressed. The families had mixed ethnic backgrounds. The majority were northern European-American families (n¼62, 37%), but a substantial proportion were African- American kindreds (n¼60, 36%). Chromosome 13 markers, spaced at intervals of approximately 10cMover the entire chromosome and 2–5 cM for the 13q32 region were genotyped and the data analyzed using semiparametric affected only linkage analysis. For the combined sample (with race broadly defined and schizophrenia narrowly defined) the maximum LOD score was 1.43 (Z-score of 2.57; P¼0.01) at 79.0 cM between markers D13S1241 (76.3 cM) and D13S159 (79.5 cM). Both ethnic groups showed a peak in this region. The peak is within 3 cMof the peak reported by Brzustowicz et al. [1999: Am J Hum Genet 65:1096–1103].
    • Long-term outcome of pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder: a meta-analysis and qualitative review of the literature

      Stewart, S. E.; Geller, D. A.; Jenike, M.; Pauls, D.; Shaw, D.; Mullin, B.; Faraone, S. V. (Wiley, 2004-07)
      Objective: To review the extant literature on the long-term outcome of child/adolescent-onset obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD). Method: Medline and Psychlit databases were systematically searched for articles regarding long-term outcomes of child/adolescent-onset OCD. Meta-analysis regression was applied to evaluate predictors and persistence of OCD. Results: Sixteen study samples (n ¼ 6–132; total ¼ 521 participants) in 22 studies had follow-up periods ranging between 1 and 15.6 years. Pooled mean persistence rates were 41% for full OCD and 60% for full or subthreshold OCD. Earlier age of OCD onset (z ¼ )3.26, P ¼ 0.001), increased OCD duration (z ¼ 2.22, P ¼ 0.027) and inpatient vs. out-patient status (z ¼ 2.94, P ¼ 0.003) predicted greater persistence. Comorbid psychiatric illness and poor initial treatment response were poor prognostic factors. Although psychosocial function was frequently compromised, most studies lacked comprehensive outcome measures. Conclusion: Long-term persistence of pediatric OCD may be lower than believed. Future studies should include broader measures of outcome including symptomatic persistence and functional impairment in multiple domains.
    • Machine Learning And MRI-Based Diagnostic Models For ADHD: Are We There Yet?

      Zhang-James, Yanli; Hoogman, Martine; Franke, Barbara; Faraone, Stephen V (Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, 2020-10-23)
      Machine learning (ML) has been applied to develop magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based diagnostic classifiers for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). This systematic review examines this literature to clarify its clinical significance and to assess the implications of the various analytic methods applied. We found that, although most of studies reported the classification accuracies, they varied in choice of MRI modalities, ML models, cross-validation and testing methods, and sample sizes. We found that the accuracies of cross-validation methods inflated the performance estimation compared with those of a held-out test, compromising the model generalizability. Test accuracies have increased with publication year but were not associated with training sample sizes. Improved test accuracy over time was likely due to the use of better ML methods along with strategies to deal with data imbalances. Ultimately, large multi-modal imaging datasets, and potentially the combination with other types of data, like cognitive data and/or genetics, will be essential to achieve the goal of developing clinically useful imaging classification tools for ADHD in the future.
    • Machine-Learning Prediction of Comorbid Substance Use Disorders in ADHD Youth Using Swedish Registry Data

      Zhang-James, Yanli; Chen, Qi; Kuja-Halkola, Ralf; Lichtenstein, Paul; Larsson, Henrik; Faraone, Stephen V (Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, 2019-06-06)
      Background: Children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have a high risk for substance use disorders (SUDs). Early identification of at-risk youth would help allocate scarce resources for prevention programs. Methods: Psychiatric and somatic diagnoses, family history of these disorders, measures of socioeconomic distress, and information about birth complications were obtained from the national registers in Sweden for 19,787 children with ADHD born between 1989 and 1993. We trained (a) a cross-sectional random forest (RF) model using data available by age 17 to predict SUD diagnosis between ages 18 and 19; and (b) a longitudinal recurrent neural network (RNN) model with the Long Short-Term Memory (LSTM) architecture to predict new diagnoses at each age. Results: The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was 0.73(95%CI 0.70–0.76) for the random forest model (RF). Removing prior diagnosis from the predictors, the RF model was still able to achieve significant AUCs when predicting all SUD diagnoses (0.69, 95%CI 0.66–0.72) or new diagnoses (0.67, 95%CI: 0.64, 0.71) during age 18–19. For the model predicting new diagnoses, model calibration was good with a low Brier score of 0.086. Longitudinal LSTM model was able to predict later SUD risks at as early as 2 years age, 10 years before the earliest diagnosis. The average AUC from longitudinal models predicting new diagnoses 1, 2, 5 and 10 years in the future was 0.63. Conclusions: Population registry data can be used to predict at-risk comorbid SUDs in individuals with ADHD. Such predictions can be made many years prior to age of the onset, and their SUD risks can be monitored using longitudinal models over years during child development. Nevertheless, more work is needed to create prediction models based on electronic health records or linked population registers that are sufficiently accurate for use in the clinic.
    • Meta-Analysis of the Association Between the 7-Repeat Allele of the Dopamine D4Receptor Gene and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

      Faraone, Stephen V.; Doyle, Alysa E.; Mick, Eric; Biederman, Joseph (American Psychiatric Association Publishing, 2001-07)
      Objective: Family, twin, and adoption studies show attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) to have a substantial genetic component. Although several studies have shown an association between ADHD and the 7-repeat allele of the dopamine D4 receptor gene (DRD4), several studies have not. Thus, the status of the ADHD-DRD4 association is uncertain. Method: Meta-analysis was applied to case-control and family-based studies of the association between ADHD and DRD4 to assess the joint evidence for the association, the influence of individual studies, and evidence for publication bias. Results: For both the case-control and family-based studies, the authors found 1) support for the association between ADHD and DRD4, 2) no evidence that this association was accounted for by any one study, and 3) no evidence for publication bias. Conclusions: Although the association between ADHD and DRD4 is small, these results suggest that it is real. Further studies are needed to clarify what variant of DRD4 (or some nearby gene) accounts for this association.
    • The monoamine oxidase B gene exhibits significant association to ADHD

      Li, Jun; Wang, Yufeng; Hu, Songnian; Zhou, Rulun; Yu, Xiaomin; Wang, Bing; Guan, Lili; Yang, Li; Zhang, Feng; Faraone, Stephen V. (Wiley, 2008)
      Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common neuropsychiatric condition with strong genetic basis. Recent work in China indicated that ADHD may be linked to Xp1–2 in the Han Chinese population. The gene encoding monoamine oxidase B (MAOB), the main enzyme degrading dopamine in the human brain, is located in this region. The current study sequenced the exons and the 50 and 30 flanking regions of theMAOBgene and found four common variants including 2276C>T and 2327C>T in exon 15, rs1799836 in intron 13 and rs1040399 in 30-UTR. We assessed the association of these variants with ADHD in 548 trios collected from 468 males and 80 females probands. TDT analysis showed that alleles of each polymorphism were preferentially transmitted to probands (rs1799836, P¼3.28E-15; rs1040399, P¼1.87E-6; 2276T>C or 2327T>C, P¼2.20E-6) and haplotype-based TDT analyses also found distorted transmission. In conclusion, this study provides the strongest evidence for the involvement of MAOB gene in the etiology of ADHD to date, at least in Han Chinese population.
    • The multidimensionality of schizotypy in nonpsychotic relatives of patients with schizophrenia and its applications in ordered subsets linkage analysis of schizophrenia

      Lien, Yin-Ju; Tsuang, Hui-Chun; Chiang, Abigail; Liu, Chih-Min; Hsieh, Ming H.; Hwang, Tzung-Jeng; Liu, Shi K.; Hsiao, Po-Chang; Faraone, Stephen V.; Tsuang, Ming T.; et al. (Wiley, 2009)
      This study aimed to examine the multidimensionality of schizotypy and validate the structure using ordered subset linkage analyses on information from both relatives’ schizotypy and probands’ schizophrenia symptoms. A total of 203 and 1,310 nonpsychotic first-degree relatives from simplex and multiplex schizophrenia families, respectively, were interviewed with the Diagnostic Interview for Genetic Studies, which contains a modified Structured Interview for Schizotypy. Using Mplus program with categorical factor indicators, a four-factor model (Negative Schizotypy, Positive Schizotypy, Interpersonal Sensitivity, and Social Isolation/Introversion) was extracted by exploratory factor analysis from relatives of simplex families and was confirmed in relatives of multiplex families. The validity of each factor was supported by distinct linkage findings resulting from ordered subset analysis based on different combinations of schizophrenia–schizotypy factors. Six chromosomal regions with significant increase in nonparametric linkage z score (NPL-Z) were found as follows: 15q21.1 (NPLZ ¼3.60) for Negative Schizophrenia–Negative Schizotypy, 10q22.3 (NPL-Z¼3.83) and 15q21.3 (NPL-Z¼3.36) for Negative Schizophrenia–Social Isolation/Introversion, 5q14.2 (NPL-Z¼3.20) and 11q23.3 (NPL-Z¼3.31) for Positive Schizophrenia–Positive Schizotypy, and 4q32.1 (NPL-Z¼3.31- ) for Positive Schizophrenia–Interpersonal Sensitivity. The greatest NPL-Z of 3.83 on 10q22.3 in the subset was significantly higher than the greatest one of 2.88 in the whole sample (empirical P-value¼0.04). We concluded that a consistent four-factor model of schizotypy could be derived in nonpsychotic relatives across families of patients with different genetic loadings in schizophrenia. Their differential relations to linkage signals have etiological implications and provide further evidence for their validity. 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
    • Neuropsychological intra-individual variability explains unique genetic variance of ADHD and shows suggestive linkage to chromosomes 12, 13, and 17

      Frazier-Wood, Alexis C.; Bralten, Janita; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Luman, Marjolein; Ooterlaan, Jaap; Sergeant, Joseph; Faraone, Stephen V.; Buitelaar, Jan; Franke, Barbara; Kuntsi, Jonna; et al. (Wiley, 2012-01-05)
      Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a highly heritable neuropsychiatric disorder that is usually accompanied by neuropsychological impairments. The use of heritable, psychometrically robust traits that show association with the disorder of interest can increase the power of gene-finding studies. Due to the robust association of intra-individual variability with ADHD on a phenotypic and genetic level, intra-individual variability is a prime candidate for such an attempt. We aimed to combine intra-individual variability measures across tasks into one more heritable measure, to examine the relatedness to other cognitive factors, and to explore the genetic underpinnings through quantitative trait linkage analysis. Intra-individual variability measures from seven tasks were available for 238 ADHD families (350 ADHD-affected and 195 non-affected children) and 147 control families (271 children). Intra-individual variability measures from seven different tasks shared common variance and could be used to construct an aggregated measure. This aggregated measure was largely independent from other cognitive factors related to ADHD and showed suggestive linkage to chromosomes 12q24.3 (LOD ¼ 2.93), 13q22.2 (LOD ¼ 2.36), and 17p13.3 (LOD ¼ 2.00). A common intra-individual variability construct can be extracted from very diverse neuropsychological tasks; this construct taps into unique genetic aspects of ADHD and may relate to loci conferring risk for ADHD (12q24.3 and 17p13.3) and possibly autism (12q24.3). Given that joining of data across sites boosts the power for genetic analyses, our findings are promising in showing that intra-individual variability measures are viable candidates for across site analyses where different tasks have been used.
    • The new neuropsychiatric genetics

      Faraone, S.V.; Smoller, J.W.; Pato, C.N.; Sullivan, P.; Tsuang, M.T. (Wiley, 2008-01-05)
    • NIMH genetics initiative millennium schizophrenia consortium: Linkage analysis of African-American pedigrees

      Kaufmann, Charles A.; Suarez, Brian; Malaspina, Dolores; Pepple, John; Svrakic, Dragan; Markel, Paul D.; Meyer, Joanne; Zambuto, Christopher T.; Schmitt, Karin; Matise, Tara Cox; et al. (Wiley, 1998-07-10)
      The NIMH Genetics Initiative is a multi-site collaborative study designed to create a national resource for genetic studies of complex neuropsychiatric disorders. Schizophrenia pedigrees have been collected at three sites: Washington University, Columbia University, and Harvard University. This article—one in a series that describes the results of a genome-wide scan with 459 short-tandem repeat (STR) markers for susceptibility loci in the NIMH Genetics Initiative schizophrenia sample—presents results for African-American pedigrees. The African-American sample comprises 30 nuclear families and 98 subjects. Seventy-nine of the family members were considered affected by virtue of having received a DSMIII-R diagnosis of schizophrenia (n = 71) or schizoaffective disorder, depressed (n = 8). The families contained a total of 42 independent sib pairs. While no region demonstrated evidence of significant linkage using the criteria suggested by Lander and Kruglyak, several regions, including chromosomes 6q16-6q24, 8pter-8q12, 9q32-9q34, and 15p13-15q12, showed evidence consistent with linkage (P = 0.01–0.05), providing independent support of findings reported in other studies. Moreover, the fact that different genetic loci were identified in this and in the European-American samples, lends credence to the notion that these genetic differences together with differences in environmental exposures may contribute to the reported differences in disease prevalence, severity, comorbidity, and course that has been observed in different racial groups in the United States and elsewhere. Am. J. Med. Genet. (Neuropsychiatr. Genet.) 81:282–289, 1998. © 1998 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
    • Patterns of Psychopathology and Dysfunction in High-Risk Children of Parents With Panic Disorder and Major Depression

      Biederman, Joseph; Faraone, Stephen V.; Hirshfeld-Becker, Dina R.; Friedman, Deborah; Robin, Joanna A.; Rosenbaum, Jerrold F. (American Psychiatric Association Publishing, 2001-01)
      Objective: The purpose of the study was to evaluate 1) whether an underlying familial predisposition is shared by all anxiety disorders or whether specific risks are associated with specific disorders, and 2) whether panic disorder and major depression have a familial link. Method: The study compared four groups of children: 1) offspring of parents with panic disorder and comorbid major depression (N=179), 2) offspring of parents with panic disorder without comorbid major depression (N=29), 3) offspring of parents with major depression without comorbid panic disorder (N=59), and 4) offspring of parents with neither panic disorder nor major depression (N=113). Results: Parental panic disorder, regardless of comorbidity with major depression, was associated with an increased risk for panic disorder and agoraphobia in offspring. Parental major depression, regardless of comorbidity with panic disorder, was associated with increased risks for social phobia, major depression, disruptive behavior disorders, and poorer social functioning in offspring. Both parental panic disorder and parental major depression, individually or comorbidly, were associated with increased risk for separation anxiety disorder and multiple (two or more) anxiety disorders in offspring. Conclusions: These findings confirm and extend previous results documenting significant associations between the presence of panic disorder and major depression in parents and patterns of psychopathology and dysfunction in their offspring.
    • Pediatric mania: a developmental subtype of bipolar disorder?

      Biederman, Joseph; Mick, Eric; Faraone, Stephen V; Spencer, Thomas; Wilens, Timothy E; Wozniak, Janet (Elsevier BV, 2000-09)
      Despite ongoing controversy, the view that pediatric mania is rare or nonexistent has been increasingly challenged not only by case reports, but also by systematic research. This research strongly suggests that pediatric mania may not be rare but that it may be difficult to diagnose. Since children with mania are likely to become adults with bipolar disorder, the recognition and characterization of childhood-onset mania may help identify a meaningful developmental subtype of bipolar disorder worthy of further investigation. The major difficulties that complicate the diagnosis of pediatric mania include: 1) its pattern of comorbidity may be unique by adult standards, especially its overlap with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, aggression, and conduct disorder; 2) its overlap with substance use disorders; 3) its association with trauma and adversity; and 4) its response to treatment is atypical by adult standards. Biol Psychiatry 2000;48: 458–466 © 2000 Society of Biological Psychiatry.
    • Pediatric mania: a developmental subtype of bipolar disorder?

      Biederman, Joseph; Mick, Eric; Faraone, Stephen V; Spencer, Thomas; Wilens, Timothy E; Wozniak, Janet (Elsevier BV, 2000-09)
    • Placebo and nocebo responses in randomised, controlled trials of medications for ADHD: a systematic review and meta-analysis

      Faraone, Stephen V.; Newcorn, Jeffrey H.; Cipriani, Andrea; Brandeis, Daniel; Kaiser, Anna; Hohmann, Sarah; Haege, Alexander; Cortese, Samuele (Springer Science and Business Media LLC, 2021-05-10)
      The nature and magnitude of placebo and nocebo responses to ADHD medications and the extent to which response to active medications and placebo are inter-correlated is unclear. To assess the magnitude of placebo and nocebo responses to ADHD and their association with active treatment response. We searched literature until June 26, 2019, for published/ unpublished double-blind, randomised placebo-controlled trials (RCTs) of ADHD medication. Authors were contacted for additional data. We assessed placebo effects on efficacy and nocebo effects on tolerability using random effects metaanalysis. We assessed the association of study design and patient features with placebo/nocebo response. We analysed 128 RCTs (10,578 children/adolescents and 9175 adults) and found significant and heterogenous placebo effects for all efficacy outcomes, with no publication bias. The placebo effect was greatest for clinician compared with other raters. We found nocebo effects on tolerability outcomes. Efficacy outcomes from most raters showed significant positive correlations between the baseline to endpoint placebo effects and the baseline to endpoint drug effects. Placebo and nocebo effects did not differ among drugs. Baseline severity and type of rating scale influenced the findings. Shared non-specific factors influence response to both placebo and active medication. Although ADHD medications are superior to placebo, and placebo treatment in clinical practice is not feasible, clinicians should attempt to incorporate factors associated with placebo effects into clinical care. Future studies should explore how such effects influence response to medication treatment. Upon publication, data will be available in Mendeley Data: PROSPERO (CRD42019130292).
    • Report from the second international meeting of the attention deficit hyperactivity disorder Molecular Genetics Network

      Faraone, Stephen V. (Wiley, 2001)
      Given evidence from twin, family, and adoption studies of genetic influence on attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), a growing number of researchers have initiated molecular genetics studies to explore the influence of specific genes on this condition. In 1999, these investigators convened to discuss ways of sharing information and facilitating collaborations across research sites. Enthusiastic response to this first conference prompted an even larger group of investigators to come together this year. This recent meeting, held in London, began with a presentation of Hypescheme, an operational criteria checklist developed in an effort to promote the reliable communication of diagnostic and other relevant clinical information related to ADHD. The benefits and limitations of Hypescheme, as well as the continued challenges to collaboration, were discussed. A new ADHD-specific rating scale, developed to be of use in genetic analyses, was also presented. Focus then turned to collaborative projects proposed by investigators and practical suggestions regarding joint data analyses projects. Finally, new data from individual sites were presented. Because the mode of inheritance of ADHD is likely to be complex, efforts to collaborate and cross-validate findings remain an important priority for researchers studying the molecular genetics of this disorder. © 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.