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The SUNY Open Access Repository (SOAR) is a centrally managed online digital repository that stores, indexes, and makes available scholarly and creative works of SUNY faculty, students, and staff across SUNY campuses. SOAR serves as an open access platform for those SUNY campuses that do not have their own open access repository environments. 

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  • Dissenting Voices Volume 10, Issue 1 (Spring 2021) Complete Issue

    Gillett, Nax; Ibrahim, Hawa; Muir, Catherine; Levitsky, Naomi; Puleo, Erica; Martinez, Myah; Cunningham, Grace; Al Sharifi, Zahraa (2021-01)
    Al-Sharifi, Zahraa, rsale1@brockport.edu - Intersecting Identities: Middle Eastern Women in Dual Cultures - Dual cultures are an experience known only to people who live in two cultures. I was inspired by my poetry and the experiences that I and my family went through as women as well as the stories of Middle Eastern women I read. They lived in dual cultures and experienced violence in their homelands alongside wars and sexism from both cultures they lived in. In the Western culture, they also experienced racism. I, as an Iraqi, tend to turn to poetry to express the variety of injustices I observed, and my people tend to do that. We are well known for our poetry that speaks about our experiences. || Gillett, Nax, rgill6@brockport.edu - Mental Health for Incarcerated Women: How is America Treating Them? - This essay examines the effects of incarceration on the mental health of female inmates and comments on what America could be doing to help them. In this essay the topic of female incarceration is viewed through an intersectional lens in tandem with systemic racism and oppression. It begins with a personal narrative describing the life of a girl named Mar, who was wronged by the system, and moves into a discussion on the failings of our current system. This essay focuses on topics through the timeline of incarceration; entry into the system, life while incarcerated, and finally, life after incarceration. Each topic is discussed in depth and includes ways to improve standards for incarcerated women and assist them in receiving proper mental health care. || Martinez , Myah, mmart20@brockport.edu - When I Realized I was the Gay Best Friend: Queer Media Representation and the “Coming Out” Process - This essay examines queer representation in widespread media and its impact during the coming out process. I examine three coming out stories in popular media and use my own story to shine a light on the challenges of coming out as LGBTQIA+. I hope readers who are struggling with coming out can use these examples to voice their LGBTQIA+ stories. || Levitsky, Naomi, nlevi1@brockport.edu - Looking into the Prevalence of Substance Abuse among the LGBTQIA+ Population - In this essay, I explore the prevalence of and reasons for substance abuse among the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer/Questioning, Intersex, & Asexual, or LGBTQIA+ community and ways to lessen the stigma and provide for more adequate treatment opportunities. || Ibrahim, Hawa, hibra1@brockport.edu - Varied Experiences of Fat Bodies - This essay argues that the varied experiences of fat bodies are not reflected in the media or public spaces of our society. In creating a world that physically has no room for fat bodies and is socially unkind and unwelcoming, the varied experiences cannot be told let alone be allowed to be understood. Voices of those who are fat need to be uplifted to create more accessible spaces for all. || Cunningham, Grace, gcunn1@brockport.edu - Disability Representations in High School English Curriculum - This essay explores the common misconceptions of disability, why disability representation is important, and provides an example of disability studies application through the novel The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini (2003). || Puleo, Erica, epule1@brockport.edu - Is Our Medical Community Failing Women? The PTSD Epidemic among Women in the United States - PTSD has become fairly recognized within the United States Medical Community. Experts have begun to expand PTSD research beyond the confines of PTSD due to war and have begun looking at PTSD in the civilian populations. Due to this advancement in research, we now know that certain identities, like gender, can put someone at a higher risk for developing PTSD. In this essay I argue that even though we are aware that gender, and more specifically being a woman, can increase someone’s chances of developing PTSD, we still see women being misdiagnosed and mistreated by medical professionals. I examine this perspective through an analysis of current PTSD literature regarding women and compare it to my own experience as a young woman who sought out PTSD diagnosis and treatment. || Muir, Catherine, cmuir2@brockport.edu - STOP: The Sexualization of Women & Girls - This essay argues that the current mainstream Western beauty ideal in the United States both fetishizes the prepubescent female body and infantilizes the adult female body. This intersection works together to create impossible standards for women and girls and ultimately can perpetuate sexual violence against women and girls.
  • INTEGRATING TECHNOLOGY IN EARLY CHILDHOOD - CURRICULUM DESIGN

    Bradley, Elizabeth; Di Finizio, Christina (2021-12)
    The purpose of this curriculum design was to create a supplemental unit that would integrate technology to enhance, increase and motivate early childhood learning. The curriculum is focused on literacy skills specifically alphabet knowledge and pre-writing. In this curriculum there are a variety of learning activities that integrate technology while also using traditional ways of learning. It is also important to guide parents on how to reinforce technology effectively at home. In addition to the curriculum, a plan for teachers was also designed. A mentor teacher program and a professional development plan are crucial to ensure that technology is integrated into an early childhood classroom effectively. Teachers must acquire the skills and confidence to use technology in their classroom. They must also receive ongoing support and training throughout the curriculum to create meaningful technology learning experiences for their students. As a result, teachers can use technology as an effective tool by promoting instruction for students that can reach a variety of learning styles and needs.
  • Place-Based Curriculum Design for a South Florida Waldorf School

    Bradley, Elizabeth; Domokos, Olga (2021-11)
    While there is a tendency to standardize curriculum to make it easier to assess progress and plan intervention, a more localized approach is better suited for reaching the educational goals that societies need. Place-based learning is essential for connecting students’ education to their natural environment, personal experiences, and the societal struggles of their place of living. By being independent of centrally mandated standards, Waldorf schools are excellent candidates for developing and implementing educational programs that make learning meaningful and relevant to the students’ lives and communities. This paper includes research into the theory of place-based education, a list of best practices, and finally, a place-based 6th-grade history curriculum piece. As I started to apply the concepts of this work, I learned that there is no grade level or academic subject that does not lend itself to a place-based approach. It is only a matter of time and effort to understand what local means and how it connects to learning goals. The positive feedback from my students and their increased level of engagement have confirmed the validity of this approach.
  • Supporting Self-Directed Play in Early Childhood Classrooms

    Bradley, Elizabeth; Dunlap, Kyle (2021-12)
    Public education has become increasingly standardized and academically focused in the past decade. As a result, traditional kindergartens which provided young children their first experiences out of the home have all but disappeared. Preschool programs have now replaced the kindergarten experience, but with an increased focus on academics. Children have less time to play, and early childhood educators are often not educated about the developmental significance of play or how to support play. The following is a critique of the highly standardize and scripted trend in education as developmentally inappropriate and detrimental to children’s development in the five essential domains of early childhood. Further, it proposes how early childhood classrooms should support self-directed play, why it is the correct cognitive approach to learning for young children, and how to assess if the classroom is organized in such a way that supports children in the essential domains: physical, social, emotional, language, and cognitive development through varied approaches to learning via self-directed play.
  • The transnational far right: an exploratory paper on common ideology amongst attacks

    Ryan, Emma (2021-12)
    Far-right extremist attacks are on the rise and have demonstrated the ability to inspire other attacks. This paper examines a cluster of seven attacks, five inspired by the Christchurch attacker, the Christchurch attack itself, and the 2011 Oslo and Ut⌀ya attack that inspired the Christchurch attacker. In this exploratory paper the common ideologies of the attackers are explored to look for commonalities and trends among the data.

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