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The SUNY Open Access Repository (SOAR) is a centrally managed online digital repository that stores, indexes, and makes available scholarly and creative works of SUNY faculty, students, and staff across SUNY campuses. SOAR serves as an open access platform for those SUNY campuses that do not have their own open access repository environments. 

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  • Cell-cell interactions in spheroids maintained in suspension

    Djordjevic, Bozidar; Lange, Christopher S. (Medical Journals Sweden AB, 2009-07-08)
    We have developed a system of mixed aggregates of cultured cells, to model in situ cell interactions. This three-dimensional (3D) system of floating cell aggregates, termed spheroids for their round shape, enables one to monitor their growth in both size and number of constituent clonogens and to measure survival curves for cells having 3D cell-cell interactions. This system was used to measure the three-dimensional cell-cell interactions on growth, and clonogenicity of either AG1522 fibroblasts, or HeLa cervical cancer cells (pure spheroids, or if both feeder and test cells are the same type, pseudohybrid spheroids), and/or of mixtures of both (hybrid spheroids). By following the increase or decrease in size of, or number of clonogens per, spheroid over time, one obtains growth or inhibition curves. By relating these clonogen numbers, one obtains, after a suitable growth period, relative survival. The system allows one to score the effects of irradiation and of other treatments, as well as the effect of interaction of the constituent cells on their survival. Floating pure, or pseudohybrid (composed of 10% live fibroblasts and 90% supralethally irradiated fibroblast feeder cells) spheroids, shrank to about 10-20% of their volume in three days and then remained at that size for up to six days. In contrast, pure spheroids composed of live HeLa cells increased their volume by an order of magnitude over the same period. Survival of cells in spheroids was measured by the ability of individual spheroids to grow beyond a size implying a ten-fold increase. A caveat to be observed is to correct survival for cellular multiplicity, i.e. reduce survival values to compensate for more than one colony former at the time of irradiation. The system of spheroids floating and growing in nutrient medium provides a selective system for evaluating growth of HeLa, and by implication, other neoplastic cells, without interference from (overgrowth by) normal fibroblasts. Thus it is possible to discriminate between normal and neoplastic cells by virtue of whether or not cells grow in suspension. Such a system seems ideal for testing novel strategies (radiation in combination with chemicals), in an in vivo-like environment.
  • Prostatic irradiation-induced sexual dysfunction: A review and multidisciplinary guide to management in the radical radiotherapy era (Part III on Psychosexual Therapy and the Masculine Self-Esteem)

    Ramirez-Fort, Marigdalia K.; Suarez, Paula; Carrion, Margely; Weiner, Daniel; Postl, Claire; Arribas, Ricardo; Sayyah, Mehdi; Forta, Digna V.; Niaz, M. Junaid; Feily, Amir; et al. (VM Media SP. zo.o VM Group SK, 2020-07)
    Psychological morbidity, sexuality, and health/system information have been identified as the highest areas of support needs in patients undergoing management of their prostate cancer (PCa). Management of a patient's sexual function prior to, during and after PCa radiotherapy requires multidisciplinary coordination of care between radiation oncologists, urologists, dermatologists, pharmacists, and psychiatrists. The finale of this three-part review provides a framework for clinicians to better understand the role of mental healthcare providers in the management of sexual toxicities associated with prostatic radiotherapy. The authors recommend that patients be referred for psychological evaluation and possibly to individual, couples or group general or cognitive behavioral sex therapy at the time of their PCa diagnosis, for a more specialized focus on management of sexual toxicities and sexual recovery. The importance and implications of the masculine self-esteem, sexual orientation, gender identification, cultural expectations, relationship status and patient education are reviewed. Well-informed patients tend to have a better quality of life outcomes compared to patients that take on a passive role in their cancer management.
  • Prostatic irradiation-induced sexual dysfunction: A review and multidisciplinary guide to management in the radical radiotherapy era (Part II on Urological Management)

    Rogers, Marc J.; Ramirez-Fort, Marigdalia K.; Kashanian, James A.; Broster, Seth A.; Matta, Jaime; Mahase, Sean S.; Fort, Digna V.; Niaz, M. Junaid; McClelland, Shearwood; Bander, Neil H.; et al. (VM Media SP. zo.o VM Group SK, 2020-07)
    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in men and the second leading cause of cancer-related death in men. Radiotherapy is a curative option that is administered via external beam radiation, brachytherapy, or in combination. Sexual dysfunction is a common toxicity following radiotherapy, similar to men undergoing radical prostatectomy, but the etiology is different. The pathophysiology of radiation-induced sexual dysfunction is multi-factorial, and the toxicity is a major cause of impaired quality of life among long-term prostate cancer survivors. Management of a patient's sexual function during and after radiotherapy requires multidisciplinary coordination of care between radiation oncology, urology, psychiatry, pharmacy, and dermatology. This review provides a framework for clinicians to better understand prostatic radiotherapy-induced sexual dysfunction diagnosis, evaluation, and a patient-centered approach to toxicity preventive strategies and management.
  • Prostatic irradiation-induced sexual dysfunction: a review and multidisciplinary guide to management in the radical radiotherapy era (Part I defining the organ at risk for sexual toxicities)

    Ramirez-Fort, Marigdalia K.; Rogers, Marc J.; Santiago, Roberto; Mahase, Sean S.; Mendez, Melissa; Zheng, Yi; Kong, Xiang; Kashanian, James A.; Niaz, M. Junaid; McClelland, Shearwood; et al. (VM Media SP. zo.o VM Group SK, 2020-05)
    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer-related death in men. Radiotherapy is a curative option that is administered via external beam radiation, brachytherapy, or in combination. Erectile, ejaculatory and orgasm dysfunction(s) is/are known potential and common toxicities associated with prostate radiotherapy. Our multidisciplinary team of physicians and/or scientists have written a three (3) part comprehensive review of the pathogenesis and management radiation-induced sexual dysfunction. Part I reviews pertinent anatomy associated with normal sexual function and then considers the pathogenesis of prostate radiation-induced sexual toxicities. Next, our team considers the associated radiobiological (including the effects of time, dose and fractionation) and physical (treatment planning and defining a novel Organ at Risk (OAR)) components that should be minded in the context of safe radiation treatment planning. The authors identify an OAR (i.e., the prostatic plexus) and provide suggestions on how to minimize injury to said OAR during the radiation treatment planning process.
  • Follicular Transplantation, Microneedling, and Adjuvant Narrow-band Ultraviolet-B Irradiation as Cost-Effective Regimens for Palmar-Plantar Vitiligo: A Pilot Study

    Feily, Amir; Firoozifard, Abdollah; Sokhandani, Toktam; Elosegui-Rodriguez, Perla; Perez-Rivera, Evian; Lange, Christopher S; Hosseinpoor, Masoomeh; Ramirez-Fort, Marigdalia K (Springer Science and Business Media LLC, 2020-04-28)
    Treatment of refractory palmar-plantar vitiligo is particularly challenging because the skin in these regions has a limited supply of follicle-derived melanocytic stem cells. Autologous hair transplantation monotherapy is effective in some forms of vitiligo through the provision of melanocytic stem cells. CO2 laser followed by exposure to light (i.e., sunlight or narrow-band ultraviolet-B [nbUVB]) has independently shown to be an effective treatment strategy. Recently, it was found that the combination of hair transplantation and CO2 laser followed by nbUVB exposure had superior efficacy to either modality as monotherapy. Similar to CO2 laser, microneedling produces skin cell proliferation and releases pro-pigmentary cytokines. Given the important role of the cytokines in vitiliginous skin, microneedling may also be an effective therapeutic modality for refractory vitiligo. Herein, we conducted a pilot study to evaluate the efficacy of hair transplantation and CO2 laser or microneedling followed by nbUVB. Microneedling and fractional CO2 laser in combination with hair transplantation and nbUVB both demonstrated utility in the induction of repigmentation in refractory palmar-plantar vitiligo; however, a larger trial would be needed to determine a difference in treatment efficacy. Nonetheless, microneedling is cost-effective and requires minimal training; therefore, microneedling can be easily incorporated into standard dermatological practice.

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